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January 30, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-30

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 1941

t y

Bach ProgramI
To Be Played
By Schnelker
Organ Recital By Student
Includes Toccata In F,
Three Choral Preludes
Four selections by Johann Sebas-
tian Bach will feature an organ re-
cital to be offered by Josef Schnelker,
Grad., at 8:15 p.m. today in partial
fulfillment of the degree of Master
of Music.
The Bach compositions include
"Toccata in F" and three Choral
Preludes with which Schnelker will
open his program. Other works
which will be heard include "Pass-
acaglia" by Bingham, Jepson's "Pan-
tomime", Sowerby's "Comes Autumn
Time", Vierne's "Symphony No. 4
for Organ" and "Andante Cantabile"
by. James.
An associate in the American Guild
of Organists since 1933, Schnelker
received his Music Bachelor degree
from Oberlin Conservatory in 1934.
From then until he began to study
organ here under 1 rof. Palmer
Christian of the School of Music,
he attended the Julliard School and
the Pius X School and studied com-
position under Healy Willan.
At the age of 14, he accepted his
first church position at St. John's

Robert G. Rodkey
Invited To Speak
At BankMeeting
Robert G. Rodkey, Professor of
Banking and Investments in the
School of Business Administration,
has been invited to speak at the 12th
mid-year Banking Conference of the
New Jersey Bankers Association to-
day at Princeton. Mr. Rodkey will
speak on "Investment and Reserve
Policy."
Other speakers who will address
the bankers include: Oskar Morgan-
stern, former director of the Austrian
Bureau of Economic Research in Vi-
enna and now teaching at Princeton;
R. Nurkse, financial and economic in-
telligence section of the League of
Nations; E. W. Kemmerer, director
of international finance section,}
Princeton; C. A. Sienkiewicz, assis-I
tant vice-president, Federal Reserve
Bank of Philadelphia; and Otto Lor-
enz, consumer credit department,!
American Bankers Association. j
The mid-year conference is spon-
sored by the Princeton University
Church in New Haven, Ind., and
laterbecameCathedral Organist
and Director in ort Wayne, Ind.
His present position is Organist and
Director of the Holy Redeemer
Church in Detroit.

General Marshall Testifies on Lend-Lease Bill

Shoveling Coal Is Routine Job
For Engineering Faculty Men

By CHARLES THATCHER
Inasmuch as keeping a stoker filled
s .usually the job of a janitor, it is
rather unusual to find two University
professors engaged in that task-and
diking it!
But that is precisely what Profes-
sors R. C. Porter and C. W. Spooner
of the mechanical engineering depart-
ment are doing in their research ob-
servation of how difterent kinds of
coal burn in standard domestic stok-
ci'rs.
Running almost continuous tests,
the two men are intent on determ-
ining what makes one kind of coal
better adapted to stoker use than
another similar kind , , meanwhile
keeping a close watch for other fac-
tors, such as temperature or draft,
which effect the efficiency of the
furnace.
Tests run anywhere from eight
hours to three or four days, and are
madeito simulate actual household
condition as much as possible. For
the most part test coals are obtained
from Michigan mines or from local
dealers. many of the latter sending
samples upon which they have re-
ceived consumers' complaints.
A new stoker resting directly on
a scale, and floatingfirebox have
made the once complicated process
of testing coal fairly simple. The

coal can be weighed right in the stok-
er, and as the fire-bix is attached
directly to the stoker. the weight of
clinger, ash and coke remaining when
the test is completed can be easily
ascertained.
Attention is also paid to the amount
of air passing through the stoker in-
to the furnace, this amount being var-
ied from time to time to determine
the point of maximum efficiency of
operation.
During the testing operation' sam-
ples of flue gas are taken for anal-
ysis, and the temperature and pres-
sure of the furnace and of the stack
are recorded. The temperature of the
stack is partcularly important, as its
regulation will conserve heat and will
eliminate chimney fires. Furnace
temperatures determines the amount
of clinker formation, also of impor-
tance.
The amount of steam generated
during the test is also measured, be-
ing passed through a separator to
keep back any unvaporized water,
then condensed, and finally passed
through a water meter which records
the amount generated.
When the test is finally completed,
all the data obtained mustabe care-
fully studied to determinet as accur-
ately as possible the efficiency of the
furnace.

With Chairman Sol Bloom (center) of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, General George C. Mar-
shall (left), U.S. Army Chief of Staff, and Major General George H. Brett (right) Assistant Chief of the Air
Corps, went over the provisions of the Lend-Lease Bill before testifying in private. Marshall told reporters
after his testimony that he believed Great Britain could defeat Germany with the American aid contem-
plated under the Bill.

Students Find Draft Questions
Easy To Answer, Davis Says
4>---- - -- -

Prof. Mabel Rhead
Will Be Featured
In Faculty Concert

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED-Students for part-
time work beginning the second
semester. Apply Room 325, Mich.
Union, 7:30 p.m. Thurs.
TRANSPORTATION -21
WANTED-Ride to Miami, Florida,
for 2 passengers Feb. 7 or 8. Will
share expenses. Write Box 20,
Michigan Daily.
FOR, RENT
SINGLE room in a quiet home. $2.75
a week. 1104 Catherine St. Phone
4$6. 249
SIX-ROOM suburban, east side. De-
sirable location, $35.50. Phone
2-2839. 255
928 1FOREST-Light pleasant double
room. $3 each will rent single.
Phone 2-2839. 256
FINE single room for male student.
Only 2 other roomers. $4.00 per
week. 954 Greenwood. 248
FOR RENT-Cozy room with pri-
vate porch, $2.50. Suite $2.50 each.
904 So. State, Phone 4685. 246
ROOMS-Single, double, and suite.
Continuous hot water. 615 Monroe
St., first house off State St. 232
FOR RENT-Comfortable, quiet
room with small private family.
Gentleman preferred. $3. Phone
2-2260. 247
DOUBLE. Private entrance, shower
bath, kitchenette, Frigidaire. Main
service and linen. Phone 6539.
610 Forest. 250
SMALL APARTMENT near Campus.
Private tub and shower. Rent
reasonable. Call 8154. 1221 Wil-
lard St. 253
TWO DOUBLE ROOMS with adjoin-
ing lavatories. Steam heat, show-
er bath, constant hot water. 422
E. Washington. Phone 8544. 238
IVES WOODS HOME, 1 block from
bus line, has available a bachelor
apartment consisting of living
room with fireplace, bedroom with
twin beds, and private tile bath
with shower. Mrs. S. W. Allen,
Phone 9710. 252
HEATING and PLUMBING
STOKER and oil burner repair and
replacements. 30-day special. Al
Root Heating Service, 2-3518. 21c

FOR SALE

TUXEDO-Black, very good condi-
tion. Too small for owner. Size
36. Only $12. Call 4626 between
6 p.m. and 8 p.m. 254
VERY DESIRABLE east side subur-
ban property in restricted district.
Two acres and modern seven-room
house. $7500. Easy terms. Oril
Ferguson, 928 Forest, Phone 2-2839.
257

Editor's Note: This is the third of
of a series of articles written with
the cooperation of Prof. Charles M.
Davis of the geography department on
"The Selective Service and the Uni-
versity." Today's article deals with the
problems involved with the filling out
of questionnaires.
By A. P. BLAUSTEIN
Although many draftees through-
out the country are experiencing a
great deal of difficulty in filling out
their questionnaires, Prof. Charles
M. Davis of the geography depart-
ment, student draft adviser, reports
that only a few of the questions are
causing any inconvenience at all for
most members of the University.
'Occupation?' Troublesome
The only blank in the question-
naire which has troubled students
most, according to Professor Davis,
is the one requiring the graduates
and undergraduates to give their oc-
cupations. They do not know, he said,
whether the word "student" is desired
or whether a position in business
hi h h h,, u held srhould b e men- E

able at the time the draftee enters
camp.
Several students have been bother-
ed recently by the problem of turning
in questionnaires late. As many of
them reach the student only after
they have been sent to his home,,
it is often impossible to return ques-
tionnaires to the draft boards on the
d,,te they are due.
Solution Explained
The best solution. Professor Davis
believes, is to fill out the question-
naire as soon as possible and send it
away accompanied by the envelope
it came in (which will have on i
the date it was sent) and a letter of
explanation. If the student thinks
that his questionnaire will be very
late, Professor Davis advises the
mailing of an immediate message
asking for special permission.
Various personal questions which
have come up because of the Selec-
tive Service Act will be discussed
in a subsequent article.

l

Compositions by Mendelssohn, Han-
del, Chopin and Beethoven will be
heard in a Faculty Concert which
will be presented by Prof. Mabel Ross
Rhead of the School of Music at
4:15 p.m. Sunday in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
A graduate of the University with
an Artist Diploma in piano in 1904,
Professor Rhead spent several years
studying with Moszowski in Berlin,
with Swayne in Paris, Lhevinne in
Berlin and New York and with Schna-
bel in Berlin.
During her concert career she spent
several seasons as soloist with the De-
troit Symphony and St. Louis Sym-
phony Orchestras.

Campus Cut-Rate Drug
Corner Liberty at State
offers the
K#ENTUC"'KY CLlUB SPmECIAL
SAVT
ON THE FAMOUS
WILLOUGHBY TAYLOR PIPE A
NATURA. INSiDE AND BEVELED EDGE
COMBINATION MOISTURE GUARD. FILTR
AND REAMER
GENUINE
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MISCELLANEOUS-20

THESIS Binding - Mimeographing.
Brumfield&Brumfield, 308 S State
19c
BEN THE TAILOR-More money for
your clothes-good clothes for sale.
122 E. Washington. 1c
DRESSMAKING and alterations.
Coats relined. Also sewing of all
kinds. Call Mrs. Ream, 8653. 208
EXPERT HOSIERY and garment re-
pair. Reasonable rates. Weave-Bac
Shop-Upstairs in Nickels Arcade.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, Phone
7112. 5c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.'
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY--Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. 10c
STUDENT BUNDLES-3 shirts, 3
pairs of sox, 6 handkerchiefs fin-
ished, 2 suits underwear, 2 bath
towels, 1 pajama suit fluffed--99c.
Ace Hand Laundry,1114 S. Uni-
versity. 15c'
TYPING- 18
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen.
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or;
2-1416. 14r
VIOLA STEIN - Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland
EXPERT TYPING-M. A. in Eng-
lish. Work guaranteed; reasonable
rates. Mrs. Walsh or Eley, 2-4108.
205
TYPING and duplicating service.
Dorothy Testa, M.A., 625 E. Liber-
ty (at State), Rm. 1. 2-1835. Re-
ports, theses, dissertations, briefs.
22c

wne Lney nave ni sumLtlm
No trikes In Defense
tioned.
Professor Davis' advice is to write WASHINGTON, Jan. 29-IIP)-Rep- I
both. "I don't believe that a dis- resentatives of 34 women's national
cussion of activities outside of school- patriotic organizations today record-
work is desired by the local draft ed a "demand for legislation pro-,
boards," he said in a recent inter- hibiting strikes in defense industry"°
view, "but it certainly does no harm and heard from an AFL leader thai
to add such material." the CIO was to blame for any stop-
As far as is known,stthe occupation page of work.
statement on the questionnaires sent
to draftees has only been devised to
give local boards an indication of
whether or not the individual is
in a vital industry. It is not believed
that the government will make use
of such information.
Streamlined Alpha Given

*C
E wwith MART MA RTINPOCHSTE
Exnr* ohcw s CMARK SANDAICH
Extra! News -- Cartoon
AKE IT A HABIT

I

The army, after the draftee has
already been sent to camp, uses its
own system to allocate different men
to different branches of the ser-
vice. After giving them a "stream-
lined Alpha" test, newcomers at mili-
tary posts are asked various ques-
tions concerning outside experiences,
hobbies and the like. From that infor-
mation decisions are made relative
to placing men in different special-
ized army positions.
These decisions are made both on
the base of qualifications in spec-
ialized fields and the openings avail-

L '0

SPECIAL NO.1 .SPECIAL NO. 1
WILLOUGHBY TAYLOR PIPE and BIG
HUMIDOR CANISTER of KENTUCKY CLUB $
TOTAL VALUE, $1.75
- SPECIAL NO 2
SPECIAL No. 2
WILLOUGHBY TAYLOR PIPE &. 1ANDY
HALF CANISTER of KENTUCKY CLUB
TOTAL VALUE, $1.39
SPECIAL NO 3 f /
SPECIAL No. 3
K.L " WILLOUGHBY TAYLOR PIPE and TWO
POCKET TINS of KENTUCKY CLUB
TOTAL VALUE, $1.25
(LIMIT ONE "SPECIAL" TO EACH CUSTOMER)

._ : ,

THOMPSON
BARBER and BEAUTY SHOP
Opposite Michigan Theater Phone 4313

Thursday, Friday and Saturday

r

i

Starts Friday! 3 Shows Daily!
40c to 3:30 P.M.-Then 55c-At 12:15-4:10-8:00 P.M.

cci

Ch'

,qb -

44

.Y
'i
}

hildren 25c to 5 P.M.
All Prices
Include Tax

To you-with every surging thrill
intact-roars the spectacular ro-
mance that has been voted the
greatest picture ever made! For
those who haven't seen it! For those
who want to see it again! This is
your opportunity-see it now!

I

Directed by Victor FLEMING
in TECHNICOLOR
starring
Clark GABLE
Vivien LEIGH
Leslie HOWARD

I

"Tighter, mammy!
Mr. Butler willbe at
the ball! I mudt be
beautiful!'" Prelude

I ~~.JiricIii2 . - U

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