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January 29, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PrMGF -1X

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WED .ltiSD ii~kY:JANUti U.SRI: 1941i

_______________________________________________________________________________________ I

_ _ r il

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Final Examination Schedule
COLLEGK OP~ L~iRATREX SCIWNT, AN TU
ItEGUJLAR EXAMINATIONS

Four Cups Will Be Awarded
To intramural Debate Victors

-- - - .

(Continued from Page 4)

Assistant Artist-Designer, salary
$1,620, Feb. 20, 1941.
Associate Chemit - Petrographer,
salary $3,200, March 3, 1941.
Associate Technical Editor, salary
$3,200, Feb. 20, 1941.
Assistant Technical Editor, salary
$2,600, Feb. 20, 1941.
Senior Pharmacologist, salary a4,-
600, Dec. 31, 1941.
Pharmacologist, salary $3,800, Dec.
31, 1941. }
Associate Pharmacologist, salary
$3,200, Dec. 31, 1941.
Assistant Pharmacologist, salary
$2,600, Dec. 31, 1941. .
Principal Technologist (any special-
ized branch); salary $5,600, Dec. 31,
1941.
Senior Technologist (any special-
ized branch), $4,600, Dec. 31, 1941.
Technologist (any specialized
branch), salary $3,800, Dec. 31, 1941.
Associate Technologist (any spe-
cialized branch), salary $3,200, Dec.
31, 1941.
Assistant Technologist (any spe-
cialized branch), salary $2,600, Dec.
31, 1941.

MILWAUKEE CIVIL SERVICE I
Instructor in Public Health Nursing
(no resident requirement) $2,100-
$2,280, Feb. 17, 1941.
NEW YORK CIVIL SERVICE
(Last date for filing application,
Feb. 7, 1941).
A bulletin containing a number of
New York Civil Service Examinations
is on file at the Bureau. Among these
are the following examinations: As-
sistant Superintendent, ° Blindness
Prevention Consultant Nurse, Farm
Products Promotion Agent, Farm
Products Promotion Assistant, Farm
Products Promotion Supervisor, High-
way General Maintenance Foreman,
Industrial Homework Investigator,
Instructor (Agriculture), Instructor
(Physical and Recreational Director),
Junior Aquatic Biologist, Junior Edu-
cation Examiner, Junior Psychologist,
Milk Promotion Agent, Milk Promo-
tion Assistant, Milk Promotion Sup-
ervisor, Physiotherapist, Psychiatric
Museum Curator, Railroad Equip-
ment Inspector, Senior Aquatic Bi-
ologist, Senior Engineering Aid, Sen-
ior Inspector of Standards and Pur-
chase, Senior Medical Biochemist,
Social Worker, Case Supervisor,

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

TRANSPORTATION --21
WANTED-Ride to Miami, Florida,
for 2 passengers Feb. 7 or 8. Will
share expenses. Write Box 20,
Michigan Daily.
FOR RENT
SINGLE room in a quiet home. $2.75
a week. 1104 Catherine St. Phone
4863. 249
FINE single room for male student.
Only 2 other roomers. $4.00 per
week. 954 Greenwood. 248
SIINGLE and double rooms for stu-
dents. Quiet, continuous hot wa-
ter. 216 N. State St. 237
FOR RENT-Cozy room with pri-
vate porch, $2.50. Suite $2.50 each.
904 So. State, Phone 4685. 246
ROOMS-Single, double, and suite.
Continuous hot water. 615 Monroe
St., first house off State St. 232
FOR RENT-Comfortable, quiet
room with small private family.
Gentleman i preferred. $3. Phone
2-,2260. 247
DOUBLE. Private entrance, shower
bath, kitchenette, Frigidaire. Main
service and linen. Phone 6539.
610 Forest. 250
REASONABLE-2 doubles, 1 single,
approved for men students. Oppo-
site Michigan League. 220 South
Ingalls St. 236
SMALL APARTMENT near Campus.
Private tub and shower. Rent
reasonable. Call 8154. 1221 Wil-
lard St. 253
TWO DOUBLE ROOMS with adjoin-
ing lavatories. Steam heat, show-
er bath, constant hot water. 422
E. Washington. Phone 8544. 238
SUITE-Second floor front in air-
conditioned approved home. $6
double, $4.75 single. Near cam-
pus. 213 So. Thayer. Phone 5156.
IVES WOODS HOME, 1 block from
bus line, has available a bachelor
apartment consisting of living
room with fireplace, bedroom with
twin beds, and private tile bath
with shower. Mrs. S. W. Allen,
Phone 9710. 252

HEATING and PLUMBING
STOKER and oil burner repair and
replacements. 30-day special. Al
Root Heating Service, 2-3518. 21c
TAILORING & PRESSING-12
SEWING-Alterations. Will also as-
sist in fitting garments you are
making. Call 2-2678. Opposite
Stockwell. 241
TAILORED suits and coats custom-
made. Daytime and evening
gowns made and remodeled. Phone
3468. 16c
MISCELLANEOUS-20
THESIS Binding - Mimeographing.
Brumfield&Brumfield, 308 S State
19c
WASTED-One J-Hop ticket des-
per4tely needed. 300 Tyler. Phone
2-4591. B. Kniskern. 251
EXPERT HOSIERY and garment re-
pair. Reasonable rates.kWeave-Bac
Shop-Upstairs in Nickels Arcade.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, Phone
7112. 5c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned:
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. 10c
TYPING - 18
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN - Experienced legal1
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
EXPERT TYPING-M. A. in Eng-
lish. Work guaranteed; reasonable'
rates. Mrs. Walsh or Eley, 2-4108.
205
TYPING and duplicating service.
Dorothy Testa, M.A., 625 E. Liber-
ty (at State), Rm. 1. 2-1835. Re-
ports, theses, dissertations, briefs.
22c

Settlement Accounts Clerk, Stenog-
rapher, Account Clerk, X-Ray Techni-
cian, Assistant Photo Recording
Clerk, Guard-Farmer, Head Janitor,
and Senior Court Clerk.
Complete information on file at
the Bureau, 201 Mason Hall. Office
hours: 9-12 and 2-4.
A cademic Notices
Bacteriology Seminar tonight at
8:00, Room 1564 East Medical Build-
ing. Subject: "Lysozyme and Other
Bacteriocidal Substances." All inter-
ested are invited.
Biological Chemistry Seminar will
meet tonight at 7:30 in 319 West
Medical Building. "Ketosis" will be
discussed. All interested are invited.
Room Assignments, German 1, 2,
31, 32: Saturday, February 8, 9-12
German .
West Lecture, Physics: Philippson.
Diamond, Gaiss, Graf.
1035 A.H.: Striedieck, Van Duren.
231 A.H.: Sinnema, Willey, Ed-
wards, Broadbent.
35' A.H.: Pott, Ebelke, Winkelman.
German 2.
101 Ec: All sections.
German 31.
B H.H. Pott, Edwards, Diamond.
2003 A.H. Gaiss, Broadent, Ebelke.
301 U.H. Wahr.
203 U.H. Nordmeyer.
201 U.H. Reichart.
306 U.H. Eaton.
German 32.
D H.H. All sections.
History 11, Lecture II, Final exam-
ination, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 9-12: Mr.
Clark's sections will meet in 2219
A.H., and Mr. Stanton's sections will
meet in 2231 A.H. All other sections
in this lecture group will meet in
N.S. auditorium.
History 37, final examination, Wed.,
Feb. 5, 9-12: men students in room
B, Haven, and women in 231 A.H.
The final examination for Psychol-
ogy 55 will take place in Room 231
Angell Hall on Monday, Feb. 10, 2-5
p.m.
Concentrators in English: Professor
J. L. Davis will have the following
office hours this week: Wed., Jan.
29, 1-3 p.m.; Fri., Jan. 31, 1-5 p.m.
Business Administrative Taulating
Practice I: All students in this course
will report to small amphitheatre on
3rd floor of Rackham Building at 3
p.m. today.
A. D. Meacham
Combined Curriculum in Lit-Law:
Students concentrating in history on
this combined program may have
their programs signed by Professor
Vandervelde today, 9-10 a.m.; on
Thursday, 11-12 a.m., and 3-4 p.m.,
in 118 Haven Hall.
Required Hygiene Lectures for Wo-
men, 1941: All first and second sem-
ester freshmen women are required
to take the hygiene lectures, which
are to be given the second semester.
U~pperclass women who have not com-
pleted the hygiene lectures, or their
equivalent Hygiene 101, should also
enroll for these lectures, at the time
of regular classification at Waterman
Gymnasium. Any women who did
not complete the lecture series in
a previous year are urged to attend
the lectures so that they may pass
the final examination, thereby com-
pleting the requirement.
Students should enroll for one of

Time of Exercise
Mon. at 8
Mon. at 9
Mon. at 10
Mon. at 11
Mon. at 1
Mon. at 2
Mon. at 3
Tues. at 8
Tues.at 9
Tues. at 10
Tues. at 11
Tues. at 1
Tues. at 2
Tues. at 3

Mon.,
Fri.,
Wed.,
Mon.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Tues.,
Mon.,
Tues.,
Tues.,
Wed.,
Wed.,
Fri.,
Thurs.,

Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.

SPECIAL

EXAMINATIONS

Special Period
No. Time of Examination
I Sat., Feb. 8, 9-12
II Sat., Feb. 8, 2- 5
III Sat., Feb. 1, 2- 5
IV Thurs., Feb. 6, 2- 5

Courses
German 1, 2, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
Music 31
Political Science 1, 2, 51. 52
Zoology 1. Botany 1
Psychology 31. Music 1
French 1, 2, 31, 32, 51, 53,
61, 62, 91, 153
Speech 31, 32

Time of Examination

10,
7,
5,
3,
3,
11,
11,
10,
4,
4,
5,
12,
7,
6,

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12
2- 5
9-12

IRREGULAR EXAMINATIONS
English 1 shall be examined on Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2-5.
English 30 shall be examined on Friday, Feb. 7, 9-12.
Economics 51, 52, 53, and 101 shall be examined on Thursday, Feb. 6, 9-12.
It shall be understood that classes entitled to the regular examination
periods shall have the right-of-way over the above-mentioned irregular
examinations and that special exaninations will be provided for students
affected by such conflicts by the courses utilizing the irregular exam-
ination periods.
Any deviation from the above schedule may be made only by mutual
agreement between students and instructor and with the approval of
the Examinption Schedule Committee.

3-
and women's otrauraiL debating
winners and runner-up, Jock Shuler.
'42L, and Jean Maxted, '41, an-
nounced yesterday.
A large cup will be presented to
the winners in both divisions and two
cups to the second place teams. The
competition for both groups will be
held during February and March cul-
minating in the speech honors ban-
quet to be held in April.
All stud'ents interested in partici-
pating one of the oldest campus ex-
tra-curricular activities are urged to
contact Shuler or Miss Maxted. Two
men teams will be matched, espec-
ially on the basis of living condi-
tions. Sororities, dormitories, and
fraternities are urged to form one
or more teams within their units.
Any student who does not have a
partner will be paired with other sin-
gle participants.'
Suggested propositions for the sep-
arate tournaments include elimina-
tion of final examinations, revision
of the grading system and abolition
of required subjects in college. These
topics were submitted for criticism
of advanced classes in speech, ar-
gumentation and debate.
Another feature of the intramural'
program is the assistance which will
be given for teams on the propo-
sition selected by assistants of the
speech department. .This will give
students who participate in the tourn-
ament valuable experience in organ-
Conservationists
Enroll In Special
Forestry Course
Fifteen administrative officers of
conservation agencies throughout the
country are enrolled in a special short
course in administrative rhanagement

dent i iritctors pointed Out.
The men's tournament will be con-
ducted under the auspices of the
Union, and directed by Delta Sigma
Rho, national honorary forensic fra-
ternity. The League will cooperate
with Athena, women's honorary
speech group, to carry out the pro-
gram open to all women on campus.
Increased participation will insure
the traditional top-notch quality of
University debate and speech squads
for which the school is noted in for-
ensic circles, the student directors
pointed out.
Organist Plans
Master's Recital
Bach's Preludes To Open
Program Tomorrow
An organ recital in partial fullfill-
ment of the degree of Master of Mu-
sic will be presented by Josef Schnel-
ker, Grad., at 8:15 pm. tomorrow in
Hill Auditorium.
The program will open with three of
Bach's Choral Preludes and will con-
tinue with Bach's "Toccata in F,"
Bingham's "Passacaglia," Jepson's
"Pantomine" and "Andante canta-
bile" by James. Schnelker will also
play "Comes Autumn Time" by Sow-
erby and "Symphony No. 4 for Or-
gan" by Vierne.
A graduate of the Oberlin Conser-
vatory in 1934, Schnelger has held
numerous church posts serving at
present as Organist and Directot of
the Holy Redeemer Church in Detroit.
The young organist has studied at
the Julliard Summer School and at
the Pius X School in New York in ad-
dition to Oberlin and the University
School of Music.

the following sections. Each section:
vill meet at the same hour and day
each week for seven weeks.
Section No. 1, Monday, 4:15-5:15.
Date of first meeting, February 24;
Room: Natural Science Aud.
Section No. 2: Tuesday, 4:15-5:15.
Date of first meeting, February 25;
Room: Natural Science Aud.
These lectures are a graduation re-
quirement.
Margaret Bell, M.D.
Medical Adviser to Women
Exhibitions
Exhibition: Thirty etchings of de-I
tails of landscapes by Frank A.
I Waugh, formerly head of the De-
partment of Landscape Architecture
at Massachusetts State College, are
on exhibit in the wall cases in the
first floor corridor of the Architec-
ture Building until Feb. 1.
Professor Waugh is noted for his
life-long efforts in the conservation
of the native rural American land-
scape. ,
Exhibition by artists of Ann Arbor
and vicinity, in several mediums,
Alumni Memorial Hall, afternoons
2:00-5:00 through Jan. 31.
Events Today
Phi Sigma Initiation tonight at &
o'clock in the Rackham Building.
Professor E. B. Mains will speak on
"Photography in Biology." Initiation
of new memers will follow. Re-
freshments.
Women's Glee Club: No rehearsal
tonight. Next meeting February 19.
Michigan Dames: Prof. Ralph W.

Hammett will give a talk today on
Mexico illustrating it with colored
slides. This is the monthly meeting
and will be held in the amphitheatre
of the Rackham Building. Each
member is urged to bring a guest.
Coming Events
Scenes from Hamlet: The class in
Speech 163 (Oral Interpretation of
Shakespeare) will give a review of the
principal scenes from Hamlet Thurs-
day, January 30, at 7:15 p.m. in
room 302 Mason Hall. Persons in-
terested are invited to this program.

sponsored by the School of Forestry
and Conservation and led by Prof. W. Prof. Katz Recovering
F. Ramsdell. The course work is con-
ducted by Prof. G. C. S. Benson of the Rushed to St. Joseph's Hospital
political science department. Saturday afternoon (or an emergen-
The course is devoted to the prin- cy operation for a ruptured appen-
ciples and techniques of efficient ad- dn no.n L K t e
ministration, including training and chemical engineering department i
supervision of men in the field. reported resting easily yesterday. He
will not return to the -University. n-
Six agencies, including the United til after the beginning of the second
States Forest Service, the United semester.
States Fish and Wildlife Service are
cooperating in the work.Se
The men, all of whom are outstand- Three Seamen Perih
ing figures in conservation work, have VICTORIA, B.C., Jan. 28.-(A')-
come at their own expense. Although Three seamen tossed from a capsiz-
the problems they bring cover a ing lifeboat were reported missing
broad territory, the common back- tonight after earlier word that all 60
ground of the men results in a simi- passengers and crewmen of the
larity of types of problems, Profes- grounded army transport Kvichak
sor Ramsdell pointed out. had reached shore safely.

t
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