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January 24, 1940 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-24

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
'Mermen Oppose Purdue Saturday; Sextet To Face

PAGE THr v
Sarnia

Mann Expet eOf cus
To Loose Ful
Power In Tilt ."
'Shut-The-Gates-Of-Mercy'
Matt Able To Determine
Size Of Score Himself 1
Eager to show Michigan swimming %l
fans the power that will undoubted-
ly carry the Wolverines to another'
triple title conquest this year, Matt
Mann is going to 'shoot the works'
against Purdue Saturday night.
Early indications of the lineup he
intends to use point to only one thing
-that the Boilermakers are in for al
massacre.
With a pool virtually overflowing
with talent, Matt has only one way
out to keep peace'and quiet on his
team and that is to give the fellows
Who have the ability and are work- JOHN SHAREMET
ing hard a chance.
And that's just what he is going to Mann commented during a recent
do for the opening home meet of the
year. The Purdue team which just ,orkout, "but it will be interesting
recently took a 54-30 shellacking to see how our own boys are going
from Northwestern, is / liable to take to do."
a worse licking from Michigan with His own boys so far, led by a well-
a minimum of two Wolverines in
each event. conditioned gang of sophomores,
Mann revealed yesterday that his have been doing quite well. They've
"Married Brigade" comprised of Bill swept three dual meets this season
Holmes, Francis Heydt and Blake in impressive fashion and they're
Thaxter, would see action for the looking forward to a successful home
first time, Thaxter swimming with
Jack Patten in the distance races, opener against Purdue.
Heydt the backstroke and Holmes
'the 220. -
If Jim Skinner recovers sufficient- Unde Sam Notifies
ly from a cold he has had for several Star Michigan Diver
weeks, he'll swim th breast strokeI
leg on the opening medley relay, a r that Uncle Sam may
leaving the 200 yard breast stroke to steappearsin where ngleart rad
John S~haremet. step in where angels fear to tread
JohnSharmet.and try his hand at cutting Matt
Dick Papenguth must get a neur-a
osis every time he reads 'the Michi- Mann's swim juggernaut down to
gan lineup, for no coach anywhere size.
has ever found so much talent collect- Michigan's star diver. Strother (T-
ed on one team. The only way Matt Bone) Martin, yesterday received his
Mann can ease up is to hog-tie some draft notice. However it is probable
of his boys who desire action, and that he will remain in school until
that's out of the question. June, so that Mann's worries do not
"Purdue hasn't got an awful lot," commence until toa;bear hence.

Two New Indoor Track Events
WillAidIndianatInCounferetce

By HAL WILSON
The lid of the coffin in which In-
-liana hopes to bury Michigan's
.hances for an eighth consecutive Big
ren Indoor Track title appears to
'lave been nailed down a little tight-
ar by a pair of potent spikes in the
form of two new events which will
be added to the meet program this
year.
Hurdle And Broad Jump
By a vote of the 10 cinder. men-
tors at their annual meeting last
month it was decided to include for
the first time the 70-yard low hurdle
and broad jump events on the indoor
card. And this little piece of legis-
lation, completed over a conference
table in a Chicago hotel room, now
looms as a vital factor in ultimately
determining whether or not Coach
Ken Doherty's Wolverines can suc-
cessfully defend their remarkable line
of triumphs from the ferocious on-
slaught of a very powerful Hoosier
squad.
Tabbed by the experts as a meet
which will be a virtual deadlock right !
up to the last event, the addition of
the new low barrier race and the
broad jump even further compli-
cates the outcome. According to
past and present performances, al-
ways to be viewed with a critical eye
of course, Indiana appears to have
gained a definite advantage and
i should be able to add about eight
points to its total, while the Doherty-
men can figure to gain about five and
pray that some dark horse cinder-
man can sneak in and grab another
point or two.
Meet To Be Close
And in a meet as close as this one
stacks up to be, a couple markers
either way can easily swing the final
result to one squad or the other.
It is in the low stick race, especial-
ly, that the Hoosiers' quest for points
will be enhanced, for the event is
almost perfectly suited for their ace
hurdler and dashman, Roy Cochran.
In a similar race at the Butler Re-
lays last year, which was just 10

yards shorter, Cochran won handily
in 6.9 seconds, only two-tenths off
the world's record, and the Indiana
star will accordingly be the heavy
favorite to cop first in this new event.
Just who will emerge as Michigan's
strongest men to challenge Cochran
is still a question mark. Six hurd-
lers have displayed definite promise
in pre-season workouts, and Doherty
should be able to select some cap-
able starters from among Neil Mac-
lIntyre, Jeff Hall, Frank McCarthy,
Al Thomas, Bob Barnard and Jim
Byerly.
Cochran Is Threat
In the broad jmp again it is Coch-
ran with whom the Wolverines must
contend. Sixth in the conference
outdoor meet last spring, with a leapI
of 23 feet, two inches, the HoosierE
will be forced to face four of the
same jumpers who beat him then,
but nevertheless it is quite possible
that he will finish as high as second
or third.
Michigan's lone hope in this event
is sophomore Frank McCarthy whose
best leap to date is 22 feet, six inches.
McCarthy possesses a world of power,
however, and is developing very rap-
idly.
I t

Tt l Squad
Leaves Today
Westerman Will Replace
Grissen; Cagers To Seek
Second Conference Win
Ten members of the Wolverine bas-
ketball team will embark by train for
Evanston, Ill., late this afternoon,
where the Varsity quintet is slated to
meet Northwestern tomcrrow.
The list of players named yester-
day by Coach Bennie Oosterbaan in-
cluded: Capt. Herb Brogan, George
Ruelile, Mike Sofiak, Jim Mandler,

In spite of sickness, injuries and
he United States Immigration Au-
horities, the Michigan hockey teami
vill play a hockey game tomorrow
'iight with the strong Sarnia A.C.
aggregation. Eddie Lowrey is not go-
ing very far out on a limb, with a
crippled squad on his hands, but he's
confident the boys will give a good
account of themselves.
Sarnia Leads League
"This Sarnia team is good," Eddie
says, "they're leading their league in
the Intermediate Ontario Hockey
Association. They've got a stronger
outfit than the London A.C. but we've
improved since we played London and
I think we'll give these fellows a
battle." The Wolverines were nosed
out by a 7-5 score by London in the
opening game of the season, an over-1.
time battle.
For the last couple of nights, the
local lads have been forced to prac-
tice short-handed because two or
three of the boys have been side-
lined by illness. Johnny Gillis re-
gained full action last night after a
mild attack of flu had laid him low
temporarily.
Paul Goldsmith, the Wolverines'
lanky junior center, is still out as far
as practicing is concerned but Low-
rey has hopes that he'll be ready to
go by Saturday night at 8 p.m.
Other Complications
Earlier in the week, there were
other complications. Just when
everything seemed to be going nicely,
with the first Minnesota series be-
hind them, Eddie learned that there
was a possibility that the Immigra-
tion Officials were getting a little
recalcitrant. In fact, they were
threatening to throw a monkey
wrench in the works for fair.
It seems that the gentlemen at
the border let drop the information
that the Sarnia team might find it
difficult to get across the line. In-

i!!k_

I

Glimpse Of Pro Puck Life Afforded
As Red Wings PracticeOnLocal Ice

By ART HILL "I've been with the Wings for
The Detroit Red Wings were in years now. Only 26 more to go,"1
town yesterday morning . . . worked said, "but I doubt if I can make
out at the Coliseum for two hours It seems like a life-time already."

14
he
it.

they looked plenty good- -
fast, clever skaters ... stick hand-
ling par excellence and shots that hit
a dime at 20 feet. They meet the
Americans in Detroit tonight.
Wings Have 'Guts'
"They may lack finesse in some
spots," Genial Jack Adams, the Wings
manager, pointed out, "but they've
got as much guts as any team I've
ever handled. There's no substitute
for hustle."
Wally Weber compared Adams'
career to that of Yost. Adams laughed.

Cripple List
Adams wasn't kidding about the
Wings' collective intestinal fortitude.
Don Grosso was playing with eight
stitches in his foot. Alex Motter
plays in spite of a foot so sore he
can hardly walk on it. Sid Abel had
an injured shoulder which he re-in-
jured at yesterday's session. "Now
for a whole afternoon under the old
sun lamp," he commented dryly. Sid
added that he would just as soon
play the whole 48 games in a row.
"Practicing is just as hard as play-
ing," he laughed. I
Ebbie Goodfellow, the Detroit club's
veteran defenseman and assistan~t
manager, bemoaned the team's recent
string of injuries. "Two weeks ago,
we were as good as any team in the
league," he said, "now look at us.
We're lucky if we can put seven men
on the ice who are in decent shape."'
Mariucci Shows Promise
In re the future of John Mariucci,
the Chicago Blackhawk's rookie de-
fenseman who starred for Minneso-
ta's Gophers for three years, Good-
fellow was optimistic. "He's a good
skater and a hard checker," said

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Values to $2.50
Sale closes Jan. 31
Van Boven Inc.

!Ebbie. "He has a good chance tof
make the grade."
Jimmy Orlando agreed. "Mariucci's
just learning," the Wings' bad man
pointed out, "but he's 'got plenty of
fight."
Orlando was enthusiastic about
the Ann Arbor weather. "We'd play
better hockey if we could play in air
like this all the time," he said'. "This
ice is darn nice too. You can really
move out there."
Rookies Greeted Enthusiastically
Connie Brown and Dick Behling
arrived late. And with good reason.
They played a game Wednesday night
in Indianapolis, then grabbed a train
for Detroit to join the Red Wings.
They were greeted enthusiastically
by the Wings who shook hands with
them and patted them on the back
very heartily thus refuting the legend
that rookies are looked on with scorn
by the veterans.
Colorful Johnny Mowers, the
Wings' first-year goalie, didn't stop
laughing and wise-cracking through-
out the entire two-hour session.
According to the \ Detroit, goalie,
Roy Conacher of the Bruins and
Tony Demers of Les Canadiens have
the hardest shots in the game. Syl
Apps, Toronto's brilliant center man,
is also hard to stop because of his
excellent stick-handling, Johnny says.
Dressing-Room Songbird
The dressing room chatter was dom-
inated by Carl Liscombe who insisted
that he could sing better than some-
one he had heard on a Wednesday
night radio program. He proceeded
to prove it by giving a hoarse rendi-
tion of "Home on the Range" which
stopped abruptly when he was hit in
the back of the head with a thrown
hockey glove.
Mud Bruneteau (whose real name
is Modere Fernand) drew a laugh
by describing, in a broad French-
Canadian accent, how he has been
doing the cooking at his house be-
cause of the illness of his wife. "It
ended up with everything burnt, in-
cluding the baked apples," he con-
cluded.
Mowers Equals Brimsek
Goodfellow says that Sammy Lo
Presti, the Blackhawks' new goalie, is
just fair. There are several in the
league who surpass him, according to
Ebbie. Mowers, he says, is as good
or better than the great Frankie
Brimsek was during his first year in
the National League.

Spa'rtans Will
Test Mcttmen
Next Monday
By STAN CLAMAGE
Now that Wrestling Coach Cliff
Keen has put his squad through
preliminary paces against two "soft
touches", he will get his first chance
to see just what he really has this
year when the team meets a power-
ful Michigan State bunch next Mon-
day at East Lansing.
Like Michigan, State also boasts
a coach from the hot-bed of Ameri-
can wrestling, Oklahoma. Fendley
Collins, the Spartan coach, is look-
ing forward to this year as a his-
tory-making one with his current
wrestling team. Boasting several
sophomore grapplers from the Soon-
er State, Collins has one of the most
formidable wrestling squads in in-
tercollegiate circles.
Spartans Powerful
The Spartans have strength in
every division. In their opening meet
with little Wheaton College, State
won seven of the eight matches.
And six of the wins were by quick
falls. The only loss was incurred in
the unlimited match. But it can
hardly be said that the squad is
weak in the heavier division, for
they have three capable men there.
And the records show that the man
who is considered third best on the;
team, forced last year's N.I.C.A.A.
champ to require overtime in order
to defeat him.
Comparative records can also show
the power of the East Lansing team.
While Northwestern barely nosed out
Wheaton, 16-12, State won by a most
convincing score of 33-6.
Must Win By Falls
It is evident that the deciding
factor as to the Wolverines' chances
of taking State is the matter of win-I
ning matches by falls. In the first
two meets, the Maize and Blue took
the ,majority of the matches on point
decisions. So, with strength concen-
trated in the four higher weight
groups, the home grapplers will have
to work harder for falls if they
want to keep their slate clean.

Mel Comin, Bill Herrmann, Bill Cart-
mill, Joe Glasser, Leo Doyle and Hal
Westerman.
A last minute switch in the travel-
ling squad found Westerman, tiny
fie -foot eight -inch senior, replacing
Jim Grissen, who was dropped from
the team in a disciplinary measure by
Oosterbaan yesterday afternoon.
Westerman, who has been on the
squad for the past two seasons, is an
excellent ballhandler who plays both
forward and guard. Lack of height
has kept versatile Hal on the bench
this year, but recent displays of form
have won the tiny veteran a place on
the travelling squad.
Oosterbaan, who expects the Pur-
ple quintet to employ a zone defense
against his cagers tomorrow night,
had his cagers popping set shots all
yesterday afternoon as the Wolver-
ines wound up practice for the week.
Michigan will be gunning for its
second Big Ten win of the current
campaign, while the lowly Wildcats
will be out to break into the victory
column in the Conference standings
for the first time this season.
6,MM

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