100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 19, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACI

C

T-Dance Group
Will Continue
Project Work
'Final Fling' To End Semester's
Series Of Afternoon Socials;
Theme Will Be 'Bluebook Blues'
PACI, the all-campus T-dance com-
mittee, has recently been reorganized
as a central committee for the trans-
action of all business involving the
four campus organizations it repre-
sents-Panhellenic, Assembly, Con-
gress and Interfraternity Council.
In accordance with its new policy,
PACI will coordinate the work of
"Final Fling," PACI's last T-
dance of this semester, will be held
from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thurs-
day in the ballroom of the League.
The theme will be "Bluebook
Blues," and 10 hosts and hostesses,
selected from the PACT organiza-
tions, will officiate at the dance.
the four organizations in regard to
charities, dances, general parleys and
any other projects which these
groups may sponsor.
Jim Bourquin, '42E, has been elect-
ed general chairman of the reorgan-
ized committee. Betty Lyman, '41,
is secretary and William Strain, '43,
is treasurer.
Representatives on the central com-
mittee are Charlotte Thompson, '43,
and Patricia Hadley, '42, from Pan-
hellenic; Jean Krise, '42, and Miss
Lyman from Assembly; Emil Misura,
'43E, and Strain representing Con-
gress; and Ted McClogan, '42, and
Bourquin from Interfraternity Coun-
cil.
The presidents of the several or-
ganizations will be ex-officio officers
of PACI:
The appointments to the PACI
committee will be made in the indi-
vidual organizations. Each Septem-
ber, the organizations will elect one
sophomore, junior or senior to the
committee, and in February they will
each elect another sophomore or
junior. Every committee member
will serve for two semesters.
In order to maintain close coopera-
tion between PACI and its represent-
ed organizations, at each committee
meeting, the members will give a
report on the activities of their
groups. They will also bring sug-
gestions from the individual organi-
zations for improvements or changes.
The PACI members will also bring
reports of the committee's activities
to the Panhellenic, Assembly, Con-
gress and Interfraternity Council
meetings. ,
Concert To Be Given
For Faculty Women
The Little Symphony Orchestra,
directed by Thor Johnson, will give
a concert for members of the Fac-
ulty Women's Club and their guests
at 3 p.m. Wednesday in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
The Michigan Dames have been in-
vited as special guests of the Club
for the afternoon. Faculty women are
reminded that Wednesday is to be
guest day and are urged to bring
their friends to the concert.

rganizes
Spring Is On The Way!

All-Campus

Business

COmmitteee

Children's Play
y' ate liite 1titej
W i l Be Given _-- --

Reporter Describes 'Manhattan'
As Refugee And Luxury Liner

:: /

This Weekend
University Club To Pantomime1
'Hansel And Gretel' In League
Theatre Friday And Saturday
"Hansel and Gretel," traditionally!
the children's opera by Engelburt
Humperdinck, will be presented in'
the form of a dance pantomime in
the Children's Theatre by members;
of the University Dance Club Fri-
lay and Saturday.
Performances of the pantomime will
be held in the Lydia Mendeissobar
Theatre at 3:45 p.m. Friday, and at
1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Saturday. In
addition there will be an adult eve-i
ning performance Friday at which
the Dance Review, a series of inter-
pretive dances by club members, will
be added to the regular program.,

I talked witn one of the four w -
men members of the Student Sen- By JEANNE CRUMP
atc the oiher day and we both ee;a
scmething ought to be done abou Less than a year and a half ago.,
that organization. the luxury liner Manhattan was car-
The parleys-its big event of the rying Anercan refugees from the
far --seem to have atiracted a very European war zone, and I was one ofi
negligible amount of interest, and them. Just a week ago today it was
despite the fact that the few stu-
dents interviewed declared that stu- mysteriously grounded off Palm
dent dis-attendance of the affair was Beach.
due mainly to insufficient publicity, It was almost unbelievable to hear'
I feel the parley was unattended that on the regular route the boat
2 enerally because most students re- has now taken over, from New York
gard the Senate as a rather ineffec- to California through Panama, there
tive organization. were only 250 passengers. They saw a
Senators Are Ambitious t different Manhattan. What added
This is not the fault of the senators comfo t that would ave aorded
themselves. They are an ambitious
bunth, anxious to put into practice for on that trip their regular capacity
the ideals of their organization. But of 900 was stretched to take over twice
their hands are tied. the number.
The Senate has the power to "cre- Canvas Cos Fill Lounges
ate, stimulate and register campus Canvas cots were put up in the floor'
opinion" but they do not have the space of all the cabins and many of
power to act on the results of their the lounges were like dormitories.

.

>K
s.'<

Dances Tell Story findings.
The dances of the pantomime will I myself feel that the Senate lost
tell the story of the children, Hansel a great deal of prestige when it failed
and Gretel, son and daughter of a to register campus opinion in regard
poor broommaker. In the course of to the dismissal of the 13 stu-
the play, the pair are sent out ipto dents last fall. I can remember var-
the forest of Ilsenstein to look for ious: informal groups waiting for the
berries and become lost. After dances Student Senate to start a poll of
showing the fear of the children of 2omn sort on that important ques-
the forest creatures, and of the trees tion, and feeling very disappointed
which seem to become alive to them, when nothing happened.
they fall asleep to be guarded by the Senate Should Continue
fourteen angels of the familiar Pray- Perhaps the Senate felt it would
er from the original opera, be futile to register opinion because

Assembly Ball
Interv'iewing
Will Be Held
Interviewing for central committee
positions on the annual Assembly
Ball will be held from 3 p.m. to 5
p.m., Wednesday through Friday, in
the Kalamazoo Room of the League,
according to Patricia Walpole, '41,1
president of Assembly.
Representatives of the Assembly
Board who will conduct the inter-
views include the four officers of
Assembly and the president of each
of the four groups making up the
organization. Officers, besides Miss
Walpole, are Elizabeth Lyman, '41,
vice-president, Betty Hall, '41, secre-
tary, and Anne Crowley, '41, treas-
urer.
Presidents of the groups are Jean
Krise, '42, of the Ann Arbor Inde-
pendents; Frances Nevin, '41, of dor-
mitories; Barbara Ann Freidberg,
'43, of League houses; and Sara Jane
Hauke, '42, of Beta Kappa Rho.
Miss Walpole stressed the valve
of interviews. "Even though a per-
son didn't petition for a chairman-
ship," she said, "the experience of
being interviewed will be valuable for
future occasions. Although it was
necessary to petition for committee
jobs, it is not required that one be
interviewed except for committee
chairmanships.
Central committee positions open
for competition are general chairman
(music), assistant general chairman
(merits), co-heads of publicity, tick-
ets and decorations, finance, and
chairman of the patrons and pro-
gram committee. Applicants are re-
quested to bring their eligibility cards
to the interviewing.

i
1
f
t
x
3
c
t A
t
t

After awakening the children wan- they could do nothing about it any-
der into the gingerbread house of how, but I think the campus felt it
the forest witch who tries to push failed by not doing what it could
Gretel into the oven. Gretel zinally do at least.
outwits the old witch and the ginger- If the Student Senate is to con-
bread children become alive and dance tinue, I feel it should be given wider
in the gay finale, powers. Most of the innoucuous,
Players Listed if worthwhile, projects of the campus,
The dancers of the pantomime in- have been taken over by the var-
lude Elizabeth Faunce, '43, Gretel; ious honor organizations, so the
Joseph Gornbein, '41, Hansel; David Student Senate is left to handle the
Gibson, '41, their father and the more vital issues,
sandman; Shirley Risburg, '42Ed, However, without the increased
their mother; Sara Graf, Grad., the powers to handle these properly, the
witch; Neva Dilley, '41Ed, the coo- Senate is bound to fail. And as the
coo; Alex Miller, '41, the toad, and one important pernanent campus
Evelyn Spamer, '42Ed, the chipmunk. organization whose members are
Joan Bevington, '41Ed, Ruth Krem- elected by a campus-wide poll, and
ers and Miss Dilley will dance as the not appointed, the Senate should not
three trees. be allowed to die out.
Playing the parts of the 14 angels ---- - -
will be Miss Bevington, Mildred Da-
Lee, '42Ed, Miss Dilley, Reba Etter,
'42Ed, Jacquelyn Glair, '42Ed, Betty
Hasse, '43Ed, Arlene Helliesen, '42Ed,
Jean Johnson, '42Ed, Annette Kemp-
er, '42Ed, Miss Kremers, Marjorie
McCoy, '42Ed, Virginia Phelps, '42Ed,
Miss Risburg and Miss Spamer.
Continuing the cast of characters,
the parts of the gingerbread chil-F orM ii D
dren will be played by Miss DaLee,
Miss Etter, Miss Glair, Miss Helliesen
Miss Johnson, Miss Kemper, Miss
Kremers and Miss Phelps. Is it skating at the
j jArboretum ... orl

The largest liner in America until
the recent building of the "America"
was not quite the palace of luxury
that it had been while taking vaca-
tioners to Europe.
Everyone was subjected to the in-!
conveniences, even Toscanini and
Helena. Rubenstein and former Am-
bassador Kennedy's children. Such
celebrities, who add interest to every
ccean voyage, made other passengers
who had left homes abroad or had
vacations interrupted realize that
there were, literally and figuratively,
all kinds of people in the same boat.
Celebrities Pep Things Up 4
Toscanini went around being very
silent, but a friend of his wife's, Aus-
trian actress Eleanor Mendelson,
gave many interesting and laudatory
accounts of him. Miss Rubenstein was
quite "the life of the party," and
Miss Kennedy started the soliciting
for a fund for the families of sailors
lost at sea. Everyone did his bit
to make an unusual situation a plea-
sant one, and the only solemn mo-
ments were when everyone crowded
into the smoking room at night to
hear the European and American
news broadcasts.
Some passengers were leaving their
homeland to seek refuge in an un-
known country-and they were happy

in realizing their good fortune to es-
I cape the war.
For the cruisers who were on their
way to sunny California. a very plea-
,sant winter trip had come to a quick
end. Parties and entertainment for
them had at least started but for
us no formalities were even begun.
How could the program be elaborate
if many of the people had lost their
filled suit eases and trunks in the
scuffle of trains with no set schedule
and cars with no gasoline that existed
after the war had started? How
could it be elaborate if people were
leaving Euroue probably never to see
it again as they left it?
WAA SPORTS SCHEDULE
Basketball: This week's group of
games will be played in the follow-
ing order: Monday, at 5:10: Alpha
Delta Pi vs. Couzens 1 and Palmer
House vs. Mosher 1. At the same
time Tuesday: Stockwell II vs.
Kappa Alpha Theta and Couzens
II vs. Zeta Tau Alpha. Wednesday
at 5:10: Lambda Phi Beta II vs.
Mosher II. At 4:30 Thursday:
Alpha Lambda Delta vs. Pi Beta
Theta; at 5:10: Collegiate Sorosis
vs. Couzens III and Helen New-
berry vs. Delta Delta Delta.
SPECIALS
This Week:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
Shampoo, Finger-wave,
and Manicure . . .
And a regular $5.00
"Pre-Heat" Machineless
Permanent . . .
$4.00
"Yo1'1, 1'enjoy
0our om1plete service"
LYNN9SH
530 S. Forest Phone 2-4802=r
0

TI

.stijglt

,r' I
! x

winter Fun!

Coliseum . . . skiing at the
hiking along the river road

Qlla

v\.. A. \X,,,..,

N'
/
'/ /
//
/
/ /4
// 7'
'7/
A/A
/
'7;
.' /
7,
''4
7'
/
'7
/7
7;'
'7'
/4
6;
/
/
N
/
7/
47;
<A' /
7/
/7
4 7~
/7
7$
//
7/,
4$
'4'

Ove

i'nter Warcrole4 a Zi .

PORCELAIN
P STELS
Suffering from the between-
season blues. . . the pre-exam
jim-jams? Cheer. up with a
new soft pastel dress or suit
. . perfect now under furs
and later on "as is". Prints,
plaids and solids in all the
lovely pastel hues.
Sizes 9-17, 12-20

;' /~:

here is your way
to a lovely
skin
First, you cleanse with ARDENA
CLEANSING CREAM and ARDENA
SKIN LOTION, or ARDENA FLUFFY
CLEANSING CREAM. Second, you
tone with ARDENA SKIN LOTION.
Third, you smooth with VELVA
CREAM or ORANGE SKIN CREAM.
That's the famous Solon formula
which great beauties use twice
a day, every day of their lives.
ARDENA LIQUEFYING CLEANSING
CREAM..............1.00 TO 6.00
ARDENA FLUFFY CLEANSING CREAM,
1.00 TO 6.00
ARDENA SKIN LOTION... 1.00 TO 15.00
VELVA CREAM .........1.00 TO 6.00
ORANGE SKIN CREAM... 1.00 TO 8.00
AtCV '
S~ir1ic
zu,,

of a frosty afternoon that intrigues your win-
ter fancy? No matter which your favorite,
you appreciate the color, the comfort, the
smart good looks of a well-tailored sports
outfit.
Gent h in T n for 'W uter Cnrtrivnl!

it

I

I

-

t2 /

1

I

''
/
"'A
7
N'.
4
A'
4

Such you'll find at Goodyear's
. ..ski suits in wool or gabar-
dine, some with sheepskin-lined
jackets . . . skating dresses in
velveteen or jersey . .. sports-
wear separates" for ensembling
your own outfit . . . bright
Shaker knit accessories.
Ski Suits . . . . 10.95 to 19.95

11

E
I

11

Skating Dresses .

7.95 to 15.00

rom

Q wr"
" "9wD

olp,

(Suits priced from $16.95)

I

he £uarry
On State

i

{ r
I r-

r
; "
1,..., ,

Shaker Knitwear .

Separate Shirts, Skirts, Jackets
and Ski Trousers. 3.95 to 10.00

(Sweaters, Socks, loods,
MWittens)

. 1.00 to 6.50

j . I i

Nil

i

- - - , II ml II

I

II

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan