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December 17, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Geographers
Will Convene
In Louisiana
James And MacMurray
Will Present Papers
At Annual Convention
Prof. K. C. MacMurray and Prof.
P. E. James, both of the geography
department, will attend the thirty-
seventh annual meeting of the Asso-
ciation of American Geographers to
be held Dec. 27 and 28 at Baton
Rouge, La.
At the meeting, Professor James
will present a twenty-minute paper
entitled '"Expanding Settlements of
Latin America-The Statement of a
Problem." Likewise, Professor Mac-
Murray will deliver a fifteen-minute
paper, "The State Public Domain in
Michigan."
The actual meeting will be over in
two days but a field trip through
Louisiana will occupy the geographers
until New Year's Day.
The field excursion will leave as a
single unit on the morning of Dec.
29. The first day will be devoted to
contrasts between the cultures of
typical Mississippi River floodplain,
Red River flood plain and lower
terraces, the night being spent in
Lafayette.
The second day will be spent in the
Teche Country, with the night at
Houma. On the third day one bus
will proceed directly to New Orleans'
and another will go to the citrus
district of the lower delta, arriving
in New Orleans in the early evening.
Fore'nsic Group To Meet
Delta Sigma Rho; honorary debat-
ing fraternity, will meet at 4 p.m.
today in the League, Jack Schuler,
'41, president of the group, an-
nounced. All members are urged1
to be present.

____________ 3 I J M1Il.,11 yk AIN 11LFA L Y TUESDAY, DECE1WBOR 17,1Ma0

Ann Arbor
Here Is Today's News
In Summary
A traffic collision yesterday morn-
ing at E. Summit St. and N. Fifth
Ave. resulted in a serious injury to
Ernest O. Muehlig, business manager
of the Muehlig Funeral Chapel.
Muehlig was thrown from his car
and struck his head on the sidewalk.
He was knocked momentarily uncon-
scious.
It is believed at St. Joseph's Hos-
pital where Muehlig was taken that
he had suffered a probable brain
concussion and severe bruises.
* * *
Funeral services will be held tomor-
row for J. George Bischoff, prominent
Ann Arbor florist who died Sunday
night at the age of 79.
Bischoff was born in Germany and
came to this country at an early age.
* * *
Theodore J. Balgooyen, '41, suf-
fered a possible rib fracture and
severe back bruises when he fell of f
his bicycle which skidded around the
corner of Maynard and E. Liberty
Sunday morning. His back struck
a curb. He is now in the Health
Service.
Brace New Head
Of Medical Group
Dr. William M. Brace, assistant
director of the University Health
Service, last Saturday took office
as president of the Washtenaw
County Medical Society.
He was elected president-elect at
a meeting of the Society last year
and will serve as President for the
coming year.
Dr. Dean W. Myers, a local phy-
sician, was made president-elect and
will succeed Dr. Brace next Decem-
ber.
Dr. Rigdon K. Ratliff of the Uni-
versity Hospital was reelected secre-
tary-treasurer of the society at a
dinner held last week in the Union.

. . ........... ........... . .

E1

Vichy's New And Old Foreign Ministers West Quad Features French Tables

By DAVID LACHENBRUCH
'On parle francais" every day of
the week at the new French tables in
the West Quadrangle dining halls.
There are 10 tables per week, where
students interested in conversational
French may learn it by actually
speaking. All this is under the direc-
tion of Bertram Smith, Grad., a
graduate of the University of Lou-
vain in Belgium.
There is one table for beginners, at
which very elementary French is
spoken, and there is adtable for those
who ar'e extremely advanced in the
language, mainly those who have
been abroad and lived for some time
in French-speaking countries. Then
there are graduated levels of ad-
vencement at various other tables.
But there is one iron-clad rule
which all tables have in common,
and that is that the speaking of
English is strictly tbaoo!
To facilitate the introduction of
members of the tables and to "break
the ice," the table members congre-
gate 20 minutes befo-e dinner time
Capt. Davidson
Will Give Talk
Before AIEE
AME Society Will Hear
Prof. Harry E. Miller
At Meeting In League
Capt. A. L. Davidson of the naval
science and tactics department will
be the main speaker at the meeting
of the student chapter of the Ameri-
can Institute of Electrical Engineers
to be held at 8 p.m. today in the
Union.
Prior to the talk, which will be on
"Submarines" and will be illustrated
by motion pictures, the organization
will hold a discussionof the possi-
bility of a series of field trips to big
manufacturing concerns in Detroit
after Christmas.
Meanwhile, the Society of Ameri-
can Military Engineers, closing their
activity for the calendar year, will
hear a talk by Prof. Harry E. Miller
of the Department of Public Health
Engineering and Sanitation at a
meeting at 8 p.m. today in the League.
The subject of Professor Miller's
talk will be "What Would It Mean
to America if Great Britain Were
Defeated." As a colonel in the Army
Reserve Corps, Professor Miller is well
qualified to speak on this subject.

in Smith's room, where they partake I "tres interressants, tres interres-

of cocktails <consisting of tomato
iuice). Over a glass of tomato juice
and a pretzel, introductions are made
_n French and the students acquaint
themselves with each other and get
"the feel" of speaking French.
At dinner the conversations go
from politics to religion, to sex to
philosophy-all in French-with an
cccasional "passez-moi du pain," or
"les pommes de terre, s'il vous plait,"
interspersed in the conversation.
The French tables in the West
Quad have had very successful ex-
change dinners with the French
tables set up in the girls' dormitories.
The mademoiselles, they explain, are

sants."
And when a member of one of the
tables turns to a innocentguest
who happened to be invited to watch
the goings-on, and asks, "que pensez-
vous de la?" he'd better think of
something clever in a hurry.
Keniston To Speak Today
Prof. Hayward Keniston, chairman
of the Department of Romance
Languages, will discuss the charac-
teristics of a good doctoral thesis
at a meeting of the Romance Lang-
uages Journal Club at 4:15 p.m. to-
day in the West Conference Room
of the Rackham Building.

pomp$
wpm-
ts
od
Uth

I

Pierre Laval (right) was ousted by the French Chief of State
Marshal Petain as vice-premier and foreign minister in the Vichy
government. Pierre Etienne Flandin (left), a former premier, took
over the foreign ministry, but the vice-premiership was left empty.
Freshman Registration Reveals
Wide Geographical Distribution

I

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISINGI

P.

' i

LOST and FOUND
LOST-Black Parker fountain pen;
.probably in U. H. S. Please return
to Jean Crawford at Martha Cook.
Reward. 173
SUELL-RIMV GLASSES and brown
purse; Union lounge. Must have
glasses. Reward. Call Nancy
Drew, 2-4514. 170
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Practically new $129
Zenith radio, phonograph combin-
ation, automatic control. Party
leaving town will sell for $60 cash
including lots of the latest popular
dance records. Call or see Pur-
chase Radio, 331 S. Main St.
MISCELLANEOUS-20
JBEN THE TAILOR-More money for
your clothes-good clothes for sale.
122 E. Washington. is
EXPERT HOSIERY and garment re-
pair. Reasonable rates. Weave-Bac
shop-Upstairs in Nickels Arcade.
13c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, Phone
7112. 5c
TUTORING can bring returns by
using classified advertising. Rea-
sonable rates. Call at The Mich-
igan Daily. 125
TYPING--18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689. 9c
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN - Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland,
buy our large assortment
of
CHRISTMAS GREETING
CARDS
le to 50c
100 Pieces of Christmas
Name Cards, Seals and Tags
1Oc

LAUNDERING - 9
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. 10c
STUDENT BUNDLES-3 shirts, 3
b pairs of sox, 6 handkerchiefs fin-
ished, 2 suits underwear, 2 bath
towels, 1 pajama suit fluffed-99c.
Ace Hand Laundry, 1114 S. Uni-
versity. 15c
TRANSPbRTATION - 21
CALIFORNIA CARS - No waiting
for responsible parties - call Mr.
Holland, COlumbia 0100, Detroit.
165
WANTED-Passengers to Cincin-
nati, Ohio, Lexington, Ky., Chat-
tanooga, Tenn., Columbus, Ga.
Leaving Dec. 20; 1940 Studebaker.
Call Ypsi 1943J evenings. 172
PASSENGERS for cars going home
for Xmas can be found by running
classified ads. Reasonable rates
and quick results. 161
RIDE HOME in one of our trans-
portation bargains. With a car-
full, expenses are much less than
buying a ticket. Come to Cushing
Motor Sales, 400 W. Washington.
Telephone 2-3261. 167
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Rooms for men. Steam
heat, shower bath, constant hot
water, Phone 8544, 422 E. Wash-
ington. 166
BURNS PARK DISTRICT-Fur-
nished six-room house for four+
months or for second semester.
Available January first. Telephone
7059. 167

Almost two-thirds of the 1,613,
freshmen admitted into the Uni-
versity last September are presently
enrolled in the Literary College and
more than 50-per cent of them are
residents of Michigan, according to
a report received yesterday from the
Registrar's Office.
Out of this number there are 1,067
students in the Literary College, 415
in the College of Engineering, 53 in
the Architecture College, 37 in the
School of Music, 22 in the Physical
Education department, 10 in the Col-
lege of Pharmacy and nine in thy
dental hygiene department.
The total number of men whose
applications were accepted was 1,069,
595 of whom are in the Literary Col-
lege and 414'of whom are engineers,
There are 472 women in the former
school as freshmen and only one in
the latter.
Fourteen members of the Class of
'44 were admitted from outside the
United States. Seven are from Can-
ada and one each are from Bolivia,
Brazil, Cuba, Hawaii, Peru and Puer-
to Rico. The other student is a resi-
dent of South America but his native
country is unknown.
Following Michigan, which has 890
freshmen here, in the list _of states
are New York with 242, Illinois with
108, Ohio with 102, Pennsylvania
with 52, Indiana with 45, New Jer-
sey with 34, Massachusetts with 20,
Connecticut with 19 and Wisconsin
with 10.
Other states with residents who
were accepted this semester are as
follows: Arizona, one; Arkansas, one;
California, three; Colorado, one;
Florida, five; Iowa, four; Kansas,
three; Kentucky, one; Louisiana,
two; Maine, one; Maryland, four;
Minnesota, five; Mississippi, one;
Belknap To Speak Today
Prof. Ralph Belknap of the geol-
ogy department will deliver a Wright
Memorial lecture entitled "Recent
Fog Investigations" to the Institute
of Aeronautical Sciences at 7:30 p.m.
today in room 1042 E. Engineering,
Leslie J. Trigg, '41E, president, an-
nounced yesterday.

Missouri, seven, and Montana, two.
The list continues with Nebraska,
two; New Hampshire, two; North
Carolina, one; Oklahoma, three;
Rhode Island, two; South Dakota,
one; Tennessee, one; Texas, two;
Utah, one; Vermont, three; Virginia,
three; Washington, one; West Vir-
ginia, two and Wyoming, six. Seven
students are from the District of Col-
umbia.
The nine states which have no
freshmen at the University are Ala-
bama, Delaware, Georgia, Idaho, Ne-
vada, New Mexico, North Dakota,
Oregon and South Carolina.

DO YOU KNOW ANYONE who
wouldn't like an album of Strauss
waltzes for Christmas? Then give
them Tschaikowsky's Fifth. Radio
& Record Shop, 715 N. University.
JEWELRY OF BETTER QUALITY
at Eiblers. Bracelets, necklaces,
brooches, compacts reasonably
priced. We will gladly help you.
308 South State.
BOOKENDS, brief cases, fountain
pens, desk sets, book covers, bill-
folds, desk calendars, playing
cards, etc. WAHR'S BOOK-
STORES.
JUST a small remembrance or a
grand gesture! You'll find just
the gift for "her" at the ELIZA-
BETH DILLON SHOP 'round the
corner on State.
A HINT TO THE WISE. Every dis-
criminating man will enjoy a pair
of Bass Weejuns. There is nothing
finer. VAN BOVEN SHOE, INC.
FLOWERS are the perfect gift for
all women. Add the personal touch
to your Xmas gift this year with a
bouquet or corsage from UNIVER-
SITY FLOWER SHOP, INC., 606
E. Liberty.
MEN'S TIES-Ann Arbor's best val-
ues in silks-rayons - "and all
wool . .. 55c or 2 for $1.00. Can-
ton-Degener, 609 E. William,
Phone 4341.
GIFT BLOUSES-The popular gift
this season; sheers in long and
short sleeves - white and pastel
shades-Smartest Hosiery Shoppe,
Mich. Theatre Bldg.
GIFT HEADQUARTERS-Complete
stocks, perfumes, Kodaks, cosmet-
ics, smoking supplies, men's toi-
letries, pen and pencil sets, leather
notebooks. Calkins-Fletclier, 324
South State.

HE'S BOUND to be pleased with a
tie, a pair of socks, a hat or some
other article of really fine clothing
chosen from our grand selection.
SAFFELL & BUSH, 310 S. State.
IF YOU CAN'T DECIDE, remembei
music on records - a gift that's
lasting and in good taste. Albums
of records for $2.00"up. Radio &
Record Shop, 715 N. University.
GIFT SUGGESTIONS from the
VARSITY FLOWER SHOP, 1119
S. University. Candles, cards, gift
wrappings, pottery, Xmas greens,
and cut flowers.
OUR FINEST STOCK in years is
waiting for your inspection. Gifts
for every writing need and orig-
inal ;accessories with real "gift
appeal". Ball & Thrasher, 205
South Fourth Avenue.
GIFTS SURE TO PLEASE-Field
and Stream Jackets, $7.50, $15.00;
Gloves, $1.50, $4.00; Scarfs, $1.00
up; and Sox, 35c, 50c. Kuohn's
Clothes Shop, 122 E. Liberty.
FOR SOMEONE you especially want
to please, we are showing our
finest stock of furs in years. Drop
in soon, won't you? Marchande
Furs, 607 E. Liberty.
A NEW PIPE, jar of tobacco, or a
carton of cigarettes from our com-
plete tobacco counter is just,. the
thing for the man in your life -
SWIFT'S DRUG STORE. 340 S.
State.
The ideal gifts for women. Mani-
curing sets, Revlon matched make-
up sets, hosiery, and permanent
waves. The Blue Bird Beauty
Shop, 5 Nickels Arcade, Ph. 9$16.
THE BEST GIFT is a practical gift;
a sure way to give the "right"
thing is to select something from
our great stock of writing supplies.
Mayer-Schairer, 112 S. Main.

news of the dorms
By GLORIA NISHON and DAVE LACHENBRUCH

Stockwell Hall will hold a formals
Christmas dinner tonight which will,
from now on, be an annual affair,
adding still another tradition to the
new dorm's ever-growing list of them.
Edythe Anderson, '44, will enter-
tain the residents and their only
guest, Dean Alice Lloyd, with some
selections played on her vibraharp,
an unusual instrument combining
the physical characteristics of a
xylophone with the sweet musical
qualities of a harp.
A pageant, to be presented in the
drawing room after the dorm has
been closed for the evening, will in-
clude some typical Christmas tableaux
enacted under the direction of Edith
Howell, '41.
. . . and the nurses will have
their annual tree-trimming party

Thursday night . . . a private
gathering with caroling and the us-
ual Christmas festivities and
decorations, which, by the way, will
be handled under the capable direc-
tion 'of Pat Davis, '42SN, and Betty
Conner, '43SN. Jeanne Thatcher,
'42SN, is general chairman.
Stockwell's camera contest may
not produce results as hifalutin' as
the fine collection displayed at the
West Quad's faculty tea Sunday, but
they'll certainly be interesting, es-
pecially since the snaps will include
not only the ordinary outside views
of the dorm, but also some typical
indoor shots.
The East Quad will hold a com-
bined Christmas dinner and party
Wednesday . . .

I

NEW COLUMBIA

1

Shows Daily at 2-4-7-9 P.M.
Bargain Matinees 25c

GEMW

ALBUMS

I

Musical Comedy Favorites .
Kostelanetz and his Orchestra
Naughty '90's - Vol. II . . . .
Beatrice Kay
Show Tunes of Jerome Kern
Al Goodman and his Orchestra
Dinner Music - Vol. -I - Serenades .
Wladimir Selinsky and Orchestra
Hot Jazz Classics.. . . . . ..
Duke Ellington and his Orchestra
Children's Albums . .. ....
Original Stories by Vernon Crane

. . . 2.50

$3.50
. 2.50

2.50

. 2.50
1.50

SELECT YOUR FAVORITES FROM THE
HUNDREDS OF COLUMBIA ALBUMS
WE CARRY IN STOCK
OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL CHRISTMAS

A T T rlI

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