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December 15, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Ann Arbor Couple Adopts Typo

Typo has a home.
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Barry,
of 1225 Ferdon Road, Ann Arbor,
wrote finish to the near-tragic story
of The Daily's adopted dog yester-
day when they picked the six weeks-
old female puppy from among all
others in the city pound.
Mr. Barry told Daily reporters that,
his interest was aroused by the tear'-
ful Daily story yesterday that re-
vealed Typo's relegation to the
pound, and that his choice had been
made because Typo seemed just as
"cute" and "intelligent" as we of
the staff had announced.
Two things, however, slightly

piqued staff members about the se-
lection, and that was that the Bar-
ry's intend to change Typographical
Error's name to something more
suitable to a house pet, and also
that Typo was reported to be very
happy and not crying for her old
home at all. Mr. Barry did promise,
however, to bring the pup to visit
the publications building occasion-
ally.
A sincere vote of thanks goes to
the young Barry couple -- and we
wish them and our former heart-
beat a very Merry Christmas and a
long life together!

. '

I

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

i

F___________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________

R

TYPING-18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689. 9c
TYPING--Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN - Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
Pufblic. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
TRANSPORTATION -21
WANTED-2 passengers to Georgia;
leaving Dec. 20. 1940 car. Call
Ypsi 1943J in evening. 168
CALIFORNIA CARSNo waiting
for responsible parties - call Mr.
Holland, COlumbia 0100, Detroit.
165
WANTED-One way or round-trip
to Pittsfield, Mass., or vicinity.
Will share expenses. Call 2-2687.
163
PASSENGERS for cars going home
for Xmas can be found by running
classified ads. Reasonable rates
and quick results. 161
RIDE HOME in one of\ our trans-
portation bargains. With a car-
full, expenses are much less than
buying a ticket. Come to Cushing
Motor Sales, 400 W. Washington.
Telephone 2-3261. 167
FOR SALE
PERSONAL STATIONERY - 100
sheets, 100 envelopes, printed with
your name and address-$1.00.
Craft Press, 305 Malynard St. 12c

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Rooms for men. Steam
heat, shower bath, constant hot
water. Phone 8544, 422 E. Wash-
ington. 166
FOR RENT-Pleasant, well located
rooms, $2.50 and $3.00. Suite, $2.50
each. Phone 4685. 904 S. State.
164
BURNS PARK DISTRICT-Fur-
nished six-room house for four
months or for second semester.
Available January first. Telephone
7059. 167
MISCELLANEOUS-20
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL--
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, Phone
7112. 5c
TUTORING can bring returns by
using classified advertising. Rea-
sonable rates. Call at The Mich-
igan Daily. 1251
ANTIQUES 'in a Colonial setting;
specializing in furniture, old jewel-
ry, prints and books. Colonial An-
tique Shop, 303 N. Division. Phone
2-3425. P20c
LAUNDERING -9
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c

Speech Faculty
Men To Attend
Holiday Parley
Five Members To Present
Papers At National Meet
In Washington, D.C.
Fifteen members of the faculty
of the speech department will at-
tend the 25th annual convention of
the National Association of Teach-
ers of Speech and the American Ed-
ucational Theatre Association meet-
ing simultaneously in Washington,
D. C., Dec. 30 through Jan. 2.
Mr. Arthur Secord will present a
paper on "An X-Ray Study of Move-
ments of the Hyoid Bone, the Thy-
roid Cartilege and the Cricoid Car-
tilage During Pitch Change." Prof.
H. H. Bloomer of the speech clinic
will report a research study on
"Roentgen-Kymographic Technique
in the Study of Respiratory Move-
ments,"
Prof. Kenneth G. Hance will pre-
side at the section analyzing "Teach-
ing Problems and Methods in the
Course in Discussion." Prof. Louis
M. Eich will act as sponsor for the
sectional meeting which will con-
sider "Studies in American Public
Address".
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister of the de-
partment will give a paper on "Eval-
uation of the Modes of Oral Present-
ation of Literature Through the Ap-
plication of Aesthetic Criteria".
Prof. Kenneth Rowe of the English
department will discuss the distribu-
tion of new plays by young play-
wrights connected with the Univer-
sity and community theatre at one
of the group meetings.
Prof. G. E. Densmore will act as
chairman for the sectional meeting
considering "Modernizing the Con-
tent and Methods of the Basic Col-
lege Course" while Prof. William P.
Halstead, member elect of the execu-
tive committee of the National As-
sociation of Teachers of Speech will
be inducted into office.
Delegates attending the meetings
will be invited to the White House
to meet Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt
Dec. 30. Other delegates attending
the meetings from the University
will be Prof. John Clancey of the
speech clinic; William Bilto, Lyman
Partridge, and Frederick Densmore,
clinicians of the clinic; and Glen
Mills and Paul Beall, teaching fel-
lows of the department.
Be A Goodfellow
ilesearch Club
Men To Meet

Heads Bureau

STATISTICS-are all in
the day's work for Col. Leonard
P. Ayres (above), statistical
branch director in the War
Department. Preparedness drive
has brought busy days for him.
Musical Society
Plans 'Messiah'
For Wednesday

Jewish Film
Will Describe
Zionist Feats
"Our Promised Land," a Pales-
tinian film describing the construc-
tion of a new Jewish civilization,
will be given one of its first Amer-
ican showings at 8 p.m. tonight in
the Grand Rapids room of the
League by Avukah, student Zionist
organization.
Produced in natural color and
sound by an American minister, Rev.
Theodore R. Jackman, the film por- I
trays the beauty of the Holy Land
and the accomplishments of the
men and women who pioneered in
creating their new homeland. It is
a narrative of Zionist achievements;
the building of a modern city of
200.000. Tel Aviv, ofi sand dunes;
the establishment of agricultural
cooperative colonies under condi-
tions similar to those endured by
American western pioneers; the
draining of malarial swamps, and
the irrigation of the desert.
A second film, "After 2,000 Years",
will complete the program. This
movie, produced by the Jewish Na-
tional Fund, is a technicolornrecord
of life in all parts of Palestine. The
observer is taken into the homes,
schools and work of the people and
is given an insight into their daily
lives.
Tickets will be on sale at the
League desk and Lane Hall, or they
may be obtained from any Avukah
member for twenty-five cents. Pro-
ceeds will be contributed to the
Jewish National Fund for the pur-
chase of land in Palestine to per-
manently settle refugees as farmers.
Be A Goodfellow
Speech Society
To Debate Club
Alpha Nu To Meet Detroit
Group Here Tuesday
Alpha Nu, honorary speech frater-
nity will debate a three-man team
representing the Densmore Speakers
Club, forensic group organized by
Prof. G. E. Densmore of the speech
department in Detroit at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday in the Union.
The business men who have been
enrolled in the University Extension
course will meet the student group
on the question, "Resolved: That a
decrease in Federal power is advis-
able."
Merle Webb, '41, Don Smith, '41,
and Dick Steudal, '42, will comprise
the University team. Calvin N.
Smith, Bernard McKay, and James
Gillon will oppose them in the non-
decision debate.
The public is invited to attend the
forensic meet which is based on a
phase of this year's Western Con-
ference and national high school de-
bating proposition.

Financial Assistance Needed
BySchools, Moehlmah Says
Unless immediate provisions are school building program and imbal-
made by the 1941 Michigan State ance in taxation took specific form
Legislature for appropriations for when property owners adopted the
the building of schools throughout constitutional amendment curtailing
the state, the essential school plant the taxation of real property to 15
program will be hopelessly bogged mills and cut short long-term bor-
down, Prof. Arthur B. Moehlman of rowing, the educator explained.
the education school declared in The immediate effect of this limi-
one of the leading articles of the tation was to reduce school build-
newly-issued Education School Bul- ing within the state in spite of
letin. special grants by federal emergency
The condition of Michigan schools agencies, he commented.
will be similar to the one which pre- The seriousness of the situation
vailed in 1920 when school di'stricts was realized by the 1939 legislature
found themselves incapable of meet- which proposed to liberalize the bor-
ing need and providing for a huge rowing features of the aendment
catch-up program to parallel the The measure was submi ted to the
growth of communities, he warned. people and defeated as an amend-
An appropriation of $10,000,000 ment in the November election, in-
dollars is immediately desirable, dicating, Professor. Moehlman said,
Professor Moehlman pointed out in that the people still hold their former
his article, but half of that sum opinion against long-term borrow-
would ease the situation. Some ing, and that it is now up to the
formula for joint district-state con- legislature to devise other means of
tributions might also be devised. financing school plant eXtemdons
Restriction of funds available for and replacements.
LAST DAY MONDAY, DEC. 16
Purchase your tickets now for
Cist Mas Rail Excursions

b'

See
Bud Dober
NEW GRANADA RESTAURANT
from 1-5 p.m.

Stan Epstein
WOLVERINE
from 5-7 p.m.

Tickets distributed Wed., Dec. 18, at New Granada, 1-5

No Tickets Now
For Christmas
Christian Will

Available
Concert;
Perform

STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special
dent rates. Moe Laundry,
South First St. Phone 3916.

stu-
2261
loc

-*
.Ckildren 6to 16m
TYPEWRITERS... $9.95
These are used office size typewriters traded in on
Portables -- most of them sold for $125.00 new - still
have years of service in them. All in good working order.
.Also a few Brand New Remington Portables for 29.95
and 39.95. Reduced from 42.50 and 49.50
529 East- University
ANN ARBOR'S BUSY BOOKSTORE
.*,i. S
oro
TIM]
..~...thero

Henry
To

Russel

Lecturer

,Be Announced

The University's Henry Russel
lecturer for 1941 will be announced
at a meeting of the Faculty Men's
Research Club 8 p.m. Wednesday in'
the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Although the official announce-
ment will not be released to the
campus until Thursday, . members
of the faculty who attend the club'
meeting will be given the opportu-
nity of knowing in advance. The
Russel lecture is given annually in
April by the selected professor on
the research work he has done the
past year. The appointment carries
with it a $250 stipend.
Papers will be read at this meet-
ing by Prof. Felix G. Gustafson, of
the botany department, and Prof.
Arthur L. Dunham, of the history
department.

The University Musical Society will
present Handel's "Messiah" as a
Christmas offering to Ann Arbor res-
idents at 8 p.m. Wednesday in Hill
Auditorium.
In order to avoid unnecessary em-
barrassment and confusion, this
year's admission is by tickets, as
previously announced. However, yes-
terday the society revealed through
Dr. Charles A. Sink, president, that
the demand for the free tickets has
already exhausted the capacity of the
auditorium, and no more tickets are
available. Holders of admission slips
are requested to be in their seats by
7:50 p.m. Wednesday.
The concert will be conducted by
Thor Johnson, leader of the Univer-
sity Symphony Orchestra and Choral
Union Chorus which will also per-
form. Palmer Christian, University
organist, will play the organ portion
of the program.
Four distinguished soloists have al-
so contracted to sing with the group.
Thelma von-Eisenhauer, operatic so
prano who made her debut with the
Chicago company, will sing the so-
prano role; Joan Peebles, contralto,
who sang here also last year, is com-
ing from New York for the perfor-
mance; William Ham will be the
tenor; and Richard Hale will sing
the baritone role.
The "Messiah" is given annually
in Ann Arbor by the Musical Society
as their traditional contribution to
music lovers of Ann Arbor and its en-
virons in the Yuletide season.
Be A Goodfellow
Candlelight Service
Will Be Held Today
By Presbyterians
The annualhChristmas Candlelight
Service of the First Presbyterian
Church will be held today at 5:30
p.m. in the Church Auditorium.
Members and friends of the Church
are given the privilege of commem-
orating the birthday of Christ by
contributing gifts of money, clothing,
food and toys, the money to be given
for relief work in war-torn China,
and the remaining articles for other
charities.
A Pageant of the Nativity, "What
Child Is This?" in drama and music
will be presented by the Church
School, Chancel and Junior Choirs
and students. As the narrators re-
late the story, the tableaux will un-
fold. the Chancel Choir under the
direction of Mr. William Barnard,
will sing traditional carols and an-
thems and besides the organ accom-
paniment, Prof. and Mrs. Lewis M.
Simes will play the violin and cello.
Be A Goodfellow
Graduates Plan Outing
The Graduate Outing Club will
meet at 2:30 p.m. today in the Rack-
ham School for a brief business meet-
ing. After the meeting there will be
skating at the Coliseum followed by
an informal supper at Rackham.
11111- --

LA SOCI EDAD HISPANICA
presents
EL RANCHO GRANDE
(with English titles)
A GAY MUSICAL CINEMA OF MEXICAN LIFE
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Monday, December 16- 8:15 P.M.
Box Office opens December 14. Telephone 6300
All seats reserved - 35c
ART CINEMA LEAGUE
presents a new series
STARTS TONIGHT
CHARLIE CHAPLIN: Keystone Conaedies, Tonight
LON CHANEY: "The Unholy Three", Jan. 19
JOHN GILBERT: "The Big Parade", Feb. 2
EDW. G. ROBINSON: "Little Caesar", March 2
All Sunday Performances - 8:15 P.M.
Complete Series $1.00 . . . No Single Admission
Tickets at Union Desk, League Desk, and Box Office
Call 6300
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

U

SHOWS START TODAY at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.

Today - Adults 40c Incl. Tax
Now Playing!

"DESTRY" DIETRICH f5 AT IT AGAIN!

CHRISTMAS
GIFT BOOKS
First and limited Editions
Fine press books
Phonograph records
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