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December 13, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE Tvi i rHT r. i 7"Ir s Y

VVrnAkV InrA*IVILMIMT.* 19 4AAA

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,'h A tr hiBE9 13 40

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Messiah 'Iickets INow Available

Ann Arbor Policemen Ranjk
As Best Pistol Shots In State

More Goodfellow Salesmen Are Needed, Mascott Says

f-

Students have been advised to ap-
ply 'immediately for admission slips
to the Choral Union's traditional pre-
sentation of Handel's "Messiah"
which will be sung 8 p.m. Wednesday
in Hill Auditorium, Dr. Charles A.
Sink, president of the University
Musical Society, announced yester-
day.
Although admission is free to all
music-lovers, Dr. Sink declared, tick-
ets must be procured in advance at
the Society's offices in Burton Tow-
er in order to avoid undue conges-
tion and confusion on the night of
the performance. Requests, accom-
panied by self-addressed, stamped
envelopes, will be filled by mail. Tick-

ets will be honored up to 7:50 p.m.
Wednesday, after which time admit-
tance to-the auditorium will not be
guaranteed.
The "Messiah" will be performed
this year by the Choral Union group
of 300 voices, the University Sym-
phony Orchestra of 80 players under
the baton of Thor Johnson, and four
professional soloists. Coming from
New York for the recital will be
Joan Peebles, contralto, who ap-
peared here last year also, William
Hain, tenor, and Richard Hale, bari-
tone. The soprano role will be sung
by Thelma von-Eisenhauer, formerly
with the Chicago Civic Opera Com-
pahy.

LA SOC I EDAD H ISPAN I CA
presents
*EL RANCHO GRANDE
(with English titles)
A GAY MUSICAL CINEMA OF MEXICAN LIFE
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Monday, December 16 -8:15 P.M.
Box Office opens December 14. Telephone 6300
All seats reserved -35c

By ALVIN DANN
Although Ann Arbor is a commun-
ity unusually free of the serious
crime that afflicts other American
cities (there hasn't been a murder
in five years, the local police force
is kept on their toes prepared for
any emergency that may arise.
Seldom does an officer have an
occasion to fire a pistol at anyone
in the line of duty since the gunplay
on Ann Arbor streets extremely
infrequent. Yet, members of the
police force are required to practice
pistol shooting throughout the year
and if they do not pass a qualifying
test given once a year, they are sus-
pended from the force until they can
meet the requirements.
Because it ~is the duty of law en-
forcement officers to be able to meet
any situation that may occur, Chief
Norman E. Cook explained that the
ability to shoot well is necessary not
only for better police work, but also
for public safety considerations. "A
poor marksman firing on a crowded
street is very dangerous," he re-
marked.
Officers practice at least once a
month. During the winter season
they shoot indoors in an attic range
on Liberty street. Although they
have been using this indoor range
for about three years, this summer
they used their own outdoor range
for the first time. This well-equipped
fifty-yard range was constructed with
the aid of local merchants.
The average score of the entire
force is well above the average of any
department in the state, Chief Cook

-.-!
asserted. Last October the three man
team of Camp, Richter, Enkemann
captured the Governor's trophy for
wining the Class C state competition.
Cook declared, however, that the,
objective of frequent target practice
is not to develop any outstanding
pistol shooter, but rather the em-
phasis is placed on getting every
member of the force to shoot well.
Sgt. Casper Enkemann pointed out
that there are few departments that
require the average officer to shoot
as often as once a month.
The best marksmen on the force at
the present time are Stauch, Earl,
Schmid, Schlupe, and Enkemann.
Sgt. Clark Earl is the chief range
officer whose task it is to supervise
practice.
Goodfellows - Monday
Future Teachers
Will Meet Today
F.T.A., Future Teachers of Ameri-
ca, undergraduate club for students
in education will meet at 4:15 p.m.
today in the Elementary School
Library, Dr. Claude Eggerson, adviser
to the group announced.
Mr. Fred Wolcott of the staff of
the School of Education and the Uni-
versity High School will speak on the
social responsibility of the teaching
profesion.
A business meeting will be held
preceding the fireside talk. Members
of the program committee in charge
of the meeting are Joan Ferguson,
Frances Boucher, Gladys Coffield,
and Earl Radley.

(Continued from Page 1)
nine children there had never been
many luxuries, but there had been
enough necessities to go around.
After Mr. M died, Mrs. M was
helped to establish herself in a room-
ing house, taking in boarders. She
managed pretty well when the two
older boys were working but if they1
were laid off or ill, the whole fam-
ily had to scrimp. Each child in the

family had his own project for help-
ing with the income: even Alice,
five years old, tried to help by selling
lemonade to neighbors.
The older boys had been forced to
quit school to get jobs so that the
younger ones might finish their ed-
ucations. Last month the two older
boys were called up for government
service,
The Bureau is interested in keeping

L

up the morale of this little group,
preserving the unusually strong fam-
ily spirit, helping the younger child-
ren to prepare for a happy adult
life.
With the help of the Goodfellow
Fund, the Bureau has been able to
give aid to families like the M's
who are not eligible for public re-
lief but whose marginal incomes can
create so many other problems.

. 6.

on
.draught

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

as well as
in bottle or can

l61

/%

Brewed for Quality
Blended for Uniformity

LAUNDERING--9
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. 10c
TRANSPORTATION -21
RIDE down to Florida in a '41 car
for five bucks. Call 6946 after 10,
for Bill. 159
WANTED-One way or round-trip
to Pittsfield, Mass., or vicinity.
Will share expenses. Call 2-2687.
163
PASSENGERS +for cars going home
for Xmas can'be found by running
classified ads. Reasonable rates
and quick results. 161

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Pleasant, well located
rooms, $2.50 and $3.00. Suite, $2.50
each. Phone 4685. 904 S. State.
164
MISCELLANEQUS-20
WANTED-Two tickets to Union
Opera Saturday night. Call Web
Cook, 2-3187.
USED CLOTHING-bought and sold.
Claude H. Brown, 512 S. Main St.
Phone 2-2756. 17c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, Phone
7112. 5c

i

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V

BEER

0

mommom

SHOWS TODAY 2-4-7-9 P.M.
NO ADVANCE IN PRICES
Starts Today!

TUTORING can bring returns by
using classified advertising. Rea-
sonable rates. Call at The Mich-
igan Daily. 125
FOR SALE
FRESH SWEET CIDER-Eating and
cooking apples. Will deliver. Phone
3926. 1003 Brooks Street. 158
PERSONAL STATIONERY - 100
sheets, 100 envelopes, printed with
your name and address-$1.00.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard St. 12c
SITUATIONS WANTED -2
SITUATION WANTED in fraternity
house by couple as porter and
cook with 1st class reference. Ph.
6764. 160
TYPING-18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689. 9c

4

R

I

TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN - Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public.. Phone 6327. -706 Oakland.

ARS HA LLS
235 S. State CUT-RATE Phone 5933
365 Days a Year
Make Marshall's Your
Xmas Gift Center
COSMETICS jPIPES
and Toiletries. Jobey
Lentheric Sasieni
Le Long Digby
Coty Malagas
Yardley Kaywoodie
SchiaparelliIFrank's
Friendship Garden
Old SpiceDr. Grabow
Revelon
and many others and many others

AN EVENING
WELL SPENT
is an evening at
Buehler's, where Italian
Spaghetti or Barbecue
Spare Ribs head a de-
licious home-cooked bill
of fare.

I

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STEAKS - CHOPS
SANDWICHES
Beer, Wine, Ales
at popular prices

The Clearnit now has a Even-Knit Hosiery Dept. at Marshall's

11 I U I~ t f Ii

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