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December 10, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i Micil
, L I I P, -- k 11, y

TUESDAY, DEC

THE MICHIGAN B:.... . xaTTY.TESDA. r.

Gould Elected
New Chairman
At Union Meet
National Convention Holds
Session At Philadelphia;
Group Hears Educators
Douglas Gould, '41, president of the
Michigan Union, was elected perman-
ent chairman of the Convention of
College Unions held at the University
of Pennsylvania campus in Philadel-
phia last-weekend. Frank Oakes, so-
cial director of the Union, and Charles
Heinen, '41E, student secretary of the
Union, accompanied Gould to the
convention. x
Opening address of the convention
was delivered by Dr. Clarence E.
Cleskell, director of placement at
Pennsylvania, who discussed "The
Importance of the College Student's
Social Training to the Employer." An
address by Miss Constance Warren,
president of Sarah Lawrence College
on "Modern Trends in Education"
followed Dr. Clesell's opening talk,
after which the convention divided
itself into seminars to discuss prob-
lems of Union organization and policy
more intimately.
Michigan was prominently repre-
sented on the panels. as well as hav-
ing its own Union president capture
the chairmanship of the convention.
Oakes served on a special panel dis-
cussion of "How the Union Serves
Minority Groups of the Campus"
along with Prof. Kimball Young of
Queens College, Don Lancaster of
Bowdoin and Foster Coffin of Cor-
nell.
Other topics discussed in the semi-
nar sessions to which the second day
of the convention was devoted in-
cluded: "The Arts in the Union," "Co-
ordination of Union Activity With
Other Campus Social and Religious
Programs," and "Food Service."

SigmaRho Tau
Chapters Meet
Today In Union
Five chapters of Sigma Rho Tau,
honorary engineering speech society,
will hold a coiference at 7:30r p.m.
today in the Union to discuss debat-
ing rules, debating topics for next
semester, a debating schedule and
a uniform membership pin.
The schools which will be present
are Michigan, Toledo University,,
Wayne University, University of De-
troit and the Detroit Institute of
Technology with Norman Taylor,
'42E, Vance Middlesworth, '41E, and
Dean Woodbury, '42E, representing
the University.
After the conference the local
chapter of the "Stump Speakers' So-
ciety" will hold the first in a series
of inter-circle debates on the topic:
"Resolved: That the Government
Should Manufacture Guns and Pow-
der."
Ten teams have thus far been se-
lected to compete in this inter-circle
contest and an award will be pre-
sented to the winner. According to
Prof. Robert D. Brackett of the en-
gineering English department, the
purpose of the competition is to
give students an opportunity to ex-
press their views, and therefore the
style of debate will resemble a busi-
ness conference more than a regular
formal contest.
Goodfellows - Monday
Watson To Speak Here
On Citizenship Training
Dr. Goodwin Watson, professor of
education at Teachers College, Col-
umbia University, will speak at 4 p.m.
today in the cafeteria of Ann Arbor
High School on "How to Train for
Citizenship in the Present Crisis."
He will address a joint meeting of
the Ann Arbor Teachers Club and the
local chapter of the American Fed-
eration of Teachers.

. .________________--__ __ y

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of Mhe
dorms~

By GLORIA NISHON
and DAVE LACIIENBlI:I(
Mildred Williams '41, informs us
that Mosher Hall will hold another
faculty dinner Thursday. The guest
list will include Dr. and Mrs. Karl
Miss Laurie Campbell, Dr. Mabel Rec-
gen, Dr. Harlan Bloomer, Mr. Werner
Landecker, Prof. and Mrs. Harold
Dorr, Prof. and Mrs. Carl Coe, Mr.
and Mrs. Fred G. Walcott, Prof. Lew-
is Vander Velde, Prof. and Mrs. Mi-
chael Pargment, Mr. Peter Ostafin,
Mr. and Mrs. Carlton F. Wells, Prof.
and Mrs. Mentor Williams and Prof.
and Mrs. A. J. Gaiss.
Stockwell Hall will hold a Christ-
mas tea dance from 4 p.m. to 5:30
p.m. Wednesday. Jane Emery, '42,
will direct proceedings.
A novel twist to the old Christmas
'tree idea can be found in the room
of Claire Cook, '41, of Martha Cook.
The attraction is a miniature tree
on a silver base which plays Christ-
mas carols as it revolves.
The West Quad's Camera Club is
preparing for a salon exhibition in
connection with the faculty tea on
the 15th. The exhibit will be set up
on the second floor concourse.
The carolers in the West are also
practicing up on Christmas songs for
the tea. Prof. David Mattern of the
Varsity Glee Club is rendering valu-
able assistance.
Among those who participated in
the student recital given Sunday by
residents of Betsy Barbour were Dor-
othy Anderson, '42, pianist; Eileen
Wismer, '42, soprano; Ruth Weiner,
'44, flutist; Margaret Martin, '41, so-
prano, and Marjorie Leete, '44, Mar-
jorie Lovejoy, '44, Jeanne Atkinson,
'44, Janet Dickinson, '41, Jean Bo-
wen, '41, and Jean Conyer, '42, mem-
bers of the chorus.
Goodfellows - Monday-
German Club Party
To Feature Chorus
Special Christmas numbers by a
choral group will be featured at the
German Club's traditional Christmas
party to be held at 8 p.m. today at
the Union. Other highlights of the
evening will include Christmas songs,
games, exchange gifts, and refresh-
ments.
All students of German are invited
and everyone is asked to bring a ten
cent gift for the exchange bag. Fac-
ulty sponsors are Dr. Otto Graf, Mr.
James Edward, and Mr. John Cin-
nema, all of the German department.

r

i .

it

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

PA I

'F.

LAUNDERING -9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sog darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c

STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special
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stu-
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STUDENT BUNDLES-3 shirts, 3
pairs of sox, 6 handkerchiefs fin-
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towels, 1 pajama suit fluffed-99c.
Ace Hand Laundry, 1114 S. Uni-
FOR SALE
CHRISTMAS CARDS-The largest
selection in town. All imprinted
with your name. From 50 for $1.00
up. Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.
lic
FOR SALE-1939 Chevrolet coupe;
steering wheel shift, Chevrolet
heater. Looks and runs like new.
$440. Terms. Box 10 or call 2-3125
at 6:00 p.m. 157
WANTED TO RENT--6
GRADUATE wants room at $3. Must
be quiet. Call Morry, 7211. Leave
message if out. 156
LOST and FOUND
LOST - Green Anthropology 157
notebook in A. H. or U. H. Reward.
Call Alice Ward, 5938. 154
Coming in Person to Ann Arbor
THE FOUR INK SPOTS
January 8-9, 1941
MICHIGAN

TRANSPORTATION -21
WANTED-2epassengers tocGeorgia;
leaving Dec. 20. 1940 car. Call
Ypsi 1943J in evening.
DRIVING to Texas Christmas vaca-
tion. One way. Companions want-
ed. Call 7595. R. S. Rose.
HELP WANTED
STRONG MAN WANTED to carry
invalid to fifth floor Architecture
Building twice weekly. Phone 6293.
152
MISCELLANEOUS-20
USED CLOTHING-bought and sold.
Claude H. Brown, 512 S. Main St.
Phone 2-2756. 17o
BEN THE TAILOR-More money for
your clothes-good clothes for sale.
122 E. Washington. lc
KXPERT HOSIERY and garment re-
pair. Reasonable rates. Weave-Bac
Shop-Upstairs in Nickels Arcade.
13c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. Sc
COLLEGE BEAUTY SHOP-Special
regular $6 Eugene super perma-
nents now $3. Phone 2-2813. Open
evenings. 151
TUTORING can bring returns by
using classified advertising. Rea-
sonable rates. Call at The Mich-
igan Daily. 125
TYPING-18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689. 9c
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN- Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.

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Phonographs and
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by

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