100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 08, 1940 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

7 tT r 74 T d"' 7 7 ?'I'l V - 74,

x'1'1' ts'sr Tsr* 1t+ ,,.

.. . - ... - :. X xxKLI ri a -. ,te'fi a.%1a7 F -911- :

240! Y, DECE'> BER S. 1940

I

(gagers

Irounce

State,

42-14;

Mustangs

Beat

Sextet,

5-4

Quintet Shows
Scoring Punch
In Initial Clash

7'.

Sofiak's Nine Points Pace
Varsity; Brogan, Ruehle
Each Account For Eight
(Continued from Page 1)
fed Ruehle for another double decker
from close up. Hindman finally broke
the Spartans' prolonged scoring
drouth by caging a foul shot just be-
fore the half ended.
The second half found the East
Lansing team an even sadder specta-
cle. The Spartans took 19 shots at the
basket and connected only once,
missed eight out of ten foul shots, and
put on a ragged exhibition of ball
handling.
The Wolverines made the game a
runaway early in the last half on a
pair of baskets by each Ruehle and
Fitzgerald and single hoops by Mand-
ler, Brogan and Sofiak, before Ooster-
baan began making wholesale substi-
tutions of reserves for the remainder
of the game.
** *
Michigan G F T M. State G F T
Sofiak, f 4 1 9 Gerard, f 1 1 3
Fitzg'ld, f 3 6 6 Morris, f 0 0 0
Herrm'n, f 1 3 5 Jones, f 0 1 1
Cartmill, f 0 0 0 Klewicki, f 0 0 0
Holman, f 0 0 0 Sherman, f 0 0 0
Mandler, c 2 0 4 Hindm'n, c 2 4 8
Comin, c 0 0 0 Mikules, c 0 0 0
Morris, c 0 0 0 Phillips, g 1 0 2
Brogan, g 3 2 8 Peterson, g 0 0 0
Ruehle, g 3 2 8 Basich, g 0 0 0
Grissen, g 0 2 2Burk, g 0 0 0
Houle, g 0 0 0 Davis, g 0 0 0
Wes'm'n, g 0 0 0
Totals .. 4 6 14
Totals 17 8 42
Halftime score: Michigan 24; Mich-
igan State 9.
Irish Hold Off USC
Last Minute Drive

~ih.rFaculty Vetoes
don wzr: chaf ter's
Grid Proposal
.DA ILY DO UBL E
DYB Ten Rules Against
Post Season Tilts
Weak Swin Sisters Back Out . . .P
CHICAGO. Dec. 7 -(/P-The West-
THE USUALLY JOVIAL Matt Mann isn't so happy these days. ern Conference threw a solid "block"
He returred from the Conference meeting yesterday with the news today against any football games af-
that his natatorial wonder boys, undoubtedly the strongest swimming team ter its regular season-of Rose Bowl
ever to represent Michigan, are practically without a schedule for the or any other variety.
coming year. By unanimous vote, faculty repre-
All in all, two Big Ten teams, Iowa and Purdue, consented to meet the sentatives of the circuit agreed to ad-
Wolverines. The rest, including such perennial rivals as Ohio State, North- here to the present rule prohibiting
western and Minnesota, turned hands down on any dual engagement with post season games. And they were em-
the great men of Mann. phatic in pointing out this applies to

Strong Western Ontario Outfit
Smothers Final Michigan Rally
<Continued from Page 1) in the period after a pileup, counted
- Michigan's first goal five minutes
his team three goals in front. Ross later on a great pass from Max Bah-
ecored on a pass from Lovett less ! rych. and the scene was set for the
than a minute later, and they were final wild period.

I

r-

"Yep," Matt pointed out, "Chicago's football team goes out of the
Conference because it was no good..We're out apparently because we're
too good."
And there was plenty of truth in that statement.
Mike Peppe. Ohio's shrewd coach who cancelled the second Michigan-
Ohio meet last year when he saw that his squad was about to take a licking,
agreed during the meeting in Chicago this weekend that Michigan andI
Ohio ought to tangle in swimming twice a year.
But then Mike went on: "But not this year, Matt. Not after what you
said to me in Columbus last February. Maybe we can get together some
other time."
That was the Ohio State excuse.. Northwestern couldn't find time
to swim against the Wolverines. Minnesota was all filled up. The others
weren't interested.
To make matters worse, this had to be the year that the Eastern water
powers also shunned Michigan's swimming team. Yale, Princeton, and the
Naivy all refused Matt's request for dual meets. The Eli coach, Kiphuth,
replied that he couldn't find a date that would fit in the Wolverines' sched-
ule. Imagine not being able to find time, when Michigan doesn't even have
a schedule.
"They call me. everything under the sun," Matt remarked. "They accuse
me of buying my boys. They do anything just to get out of swimming the
bunch,"
Then he twinkled. "But you really can't blame them. What's the
use of taking a beating when you don't have to."
That's just the point. These teams don't have to meet Michigan, and
that precisely is where the problem lies. Under the present Big Ten rules,
the coaches are left alone to draw up schedules in such sports as football,
track, swimming, wrestling and tennis.
For a long time, the Conference has realized that only football can get
along under a system such as that. The weak sisters don't mind tangling
with the big shots on the gridiron. They can make more money that way.
But in the other sports, it just doesn't work. The weak sisters find it
too easy to avoid the powerful squads. They have nothing to gain by meet-
ing them and everything to lose.
Several years ago, basketball and baseball schedules were drawn up
by the coaches. The same difficulties arose, and soon the games were de-
cided on directly in Major Griffith's office.
Why, then, can't the Big Ten handle such sports as swimming in the
same way? Let the Major draw up the schedules. It's the only way to
keep peace.
After all, no use having a Conference if you can't meet its members.

.___._ _ _... '1

both Rose Bowl and charity games.
There was only brief discussion be-
fore a decision on the proposal for
the Western Conference to join with
the Pacific Coast Conference in mak-
ing the annual Rose Bowl game a
closed affair between the twoacol-
legiate organizations. Ten faculty
representatives attended the meeting,
but the representative of Chicago,
which abolished football a year ago,
did not ballot.
There was some speculation on the
possibility of the Rose Bowl question
bobbing up again in the future. Min-
nesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, North-
western and Purdue long had been
opposed to the plan, but there had
been some support for the idea at
other conference schools. Prof. F. E.
Richart of Illinois, Committee Secre-
tary, indicated that realization that
the plan could not win approval had
prompted opponents to make the de-
ciding ballot a unanimous one.
The committee also ruled that John
Petty, star Purdue fullback, Pete
Timpermann, Purdue lineman, and
Helge Pukema, star Minnesota guard,
would be eligible for another year of
competition.

off again,
This time the trouble started in
front of the Michigan nets again,
but it was King who wentkdown. As
he lay on his back he took a kick at
Stodden with his skate, and they
ended up in the penalty box. Gillis
and Kaminsky joined them again
directly, and the ice was deserted
once more. Ross got back in time to
score his second, also on a pass from
Lovett, but then it was too late.
The first period gave a preview
of what was coming, but only a pre-
view. Nobody succeeded in denting
the nets, but everybody had a fair
chance. Hank Loud gets the glory
here, becausehe spent most of his
time knocking pucks back into a
swarm of players who were struggling
?fight i4~ front of him. He earned his
letter in the last four minutes, when
the puck was never beyond Michil.
gan's blue line and he made the better
part of his 27 saves for theperiod.
Kaminsky got the only major penalty
of the game in the last minute when
he failed to take an illegal checking
penalty in good grace.
The second period saw King cap-
turing the evening's scoring honors
with his three quick ones. The first
he put in the corner of the net after a
solo dash from his own blue line. His'
next was on a pass from Capt. Dud-'
ley Thompson, and he completed the
string with the help of Hank Baxter'
less than a minute later. Stodden,
who had been helped off the ice early

Michigan
Loud
Ross
Stodden
Lovett
Goldsmith
Gillis

THE LINEUPS
Pos. v
G
D
D
C
W
W r

W. Ontario
Freeborn
Frarey
Moore
King
Baxter
Thompson

iNG INiR
H LO1At S
'e<N

q

Spares: Michigan: Anderson, Bah-
rych, Samuelson, Heddle, Corson, Col-
lins. Western Ontario: Kaminsky,
Bauer, Allen, Rennie.
*g
* FRATERNITY .
* JEWELRY
*. is the
e 0
* Perfect Gift 0
* 0
Burr, Patterson & Auld
* 1209 South University 0
RUTH ANN OAKES
* eeeg

(I

_r t

F~~~- - ~~- _

-

Ii

To Triumph,

10-6

The University

Musical

Society

BY
TELEPONE
Ring in the merry holiday
season by giving .the folks
back home a "ring". En-
joy the warmth and pleas-
ure of a telephone visit
with them . . . complete
your Christmas vacation
plans!
Rates to most points are
lowest TODAY (Sunday)
and every night after 7
o'clock. For rates to places
not shown below, see page
5 in the telephone direc-
tory or ask "Long Dis-
tance" (dial 0).
Rates for 3-minute
night and Sunday
station-to-station
calls . . . Ann Arbor to:

LOS ANGELES, Dec. 7-(A')-
Southern California's mighty Trojans
changed their hospital nightshirts for
football suits today and gave Notre
Dame a walloping battle for 60 min-
utes, but the big green team from
South Bend walked off the field with
a 10-6 triumph after another wild ,
chapter had been added to the his-
tory of this 15-year-old intersection-
al rivalry.
Southern California's fugitives from
an influenza ward brought the roar-
ing throng of 80,000 to its feet in'
the last minute of the game with an
overhead attack that swept from deep
in its own territory to the very goal
line of the Irish as the gun sounded,
but a final pass just missed its re-
ceiver and the game was over.
SMU Edges Rice, 7-6
HOUSTON, Tex. -(IP)- A guy
named Joe kicked Southern Metho-
dist University into a tie with the
Texas Aggies for the Southwest Con-
- BULLETIN -
WACO, Tex., Dec. 7.-(AP)--Once-
beaten Texas A.&M., co-cham-
pion of the, Southwest Conference,
was named host team tonight for
the Cotton Bowl post-season game
at Dallas against Fordham Uni-
versity on New Year's Day.

I

/1

I

Presents the
BOSTON SYMPHONY,
ORCHESTRA

i

Under the Direction of

SERGE

KOUSSEVITSKY

Allegan
Atlanta, Ga.
Bay City.
Benton Harbor.
Big Rapids
Boston, Mass.
Buffalo, N.Y.
Clare ..
Coldwater.

.40
1.10
.35
.50
.45
1.15
.60
.45
.35 j

{

CONDUCTOR
For the Past Thirteen Years

-

Dallas, Tex.
Denver, Coto
Grand Have
Grand Rapid
Hillsdale

1.55
. . 1.75
>n .45
s .40
.35

41

ference Championship today and
ruined the last chapter of Rice's
football season.
Rice was leading, 6-0, after roll-
ing far downfield in five great surges,
when the Methodists scored in the
fourth period.
Then Joe Pasqua, big tackle, came
into the game and sailed the ball
above the crossbars to give SMU a
7-6 victory.

Serge Koussevitsky
Wednesday, December 11

Houghton.
Indianapolis, Ind.
Kalamazoo.

.95
.55
.35
.35

B

8:30

p.m.

m

SKI and SKATE GOODS

PROGRAM:

MOE'S are now offering you the
largest selection of winter sport
goods in Ann Arbor. When you
want sport goods of any descrip-
a.tion, see MOE'S.
MOE'S offer a wide
choice of quality skiis and
3OOTS are a Moe spec- accessories such as poles
They can be completely and harnesses.
ped in our own shop for
ment upon request. Of course, those famed
C. C. M. SKATES in
either speed or social
styles, for either men
:rrr'I" >

Overture to "LENORE," No. 3, Op. 72.
Beethoven
SYMPHONY No. 4 in B-flat major, Op. 60
Beethoven
Adagio: Allegro vivace
Adagio
Allegro vivace; Trio: Un poco meno
allegro
Finale: Allegro fia non trypo

For the past thirteen years, Serge Kousse-
vitzky has directed the destinies of the
Boston Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra
is now in its sixtieth season and its record is
phenomenal. The many appearances of this
orchestra in Ann Arbor speaks for itself as
to its popularity in this section of the
country.
A Limited Number of Tickets are still
available at the offices of The University
Musical Society in Burton Memorial Tower,
address Charles A. Sink, President. The Box
Office of Hill Auditorium will be open at

-
.I

Lansing
Lapeer
Los Angeles, Cal.
Marquette
MNt. Clemens
Nashville, Tenn.
New York, N.Y.
Pittsburgh, Pa. ...
Port Huron .....
Saginaw
Sault Ste. Marie ..
Traverse City ....

.. .90
. 1.00
.55
.35
.35
. .80
.60

.35
2.50
.85r.
.35

I

SKI B
ialty.
equipp
attach

INTERMISSION

SYMPHONY No. 5, Op. 47
Moderato
Allegretto
Largo
Allegro non troppo

Shosfeizovitch

On a call coaing 50 cents or
nore, a federal tax applies.
MICHIC*AN DELL
TELEPHONE Co.

7:00 on the night of the concert.

ft

11

1.1 1

III

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan