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December 04, 1940 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-12-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I'ACGE TIIR'rE

vI_'~s _ s s.

--Y ti . d

don wfrtchafter's
DAILY DOUBLE

1'

Trials Of An After-Dinner Speaker

. . .

Healthy; happy, and filled with roast pork, Wally Weber dropped into
Ann Arbor yesterday just long enough to take a deep breath, change his
clothes and start back on his goodwill tour.
The Double cornered the good-natured Wolverine freshman grid
coach at the Administration Building where he was straightening out some
neglected affairs and in the midst of his deep breath.
Before Weber was a large chart and a telephone. The chart was divided
into 30 sections, each of which contained a date and a dinner engagement.
That's Wally's menu for the next month.
"Nope, the wife doesn't have to cook for me anymore," he pointed
out. "I just roam around from one football bust or banquet to another
every night, giving speeches and showing pictures of the games."
Just then the phone rang. Somebody wanted Wally to talk at an alumni
gathering three weeks from now. He couldn't make it. They had to put
it off till sometime in January.
"This bell just keeps ringing all day for that sort of thing. I'm only
lucky that I don't have time to stay around here much. They'd have me
talking till some time in the summer. As it is, I was on the go last year
until June."
As Weber showed us, these after-dinner speech tours aren't all gravy.
Last week he gave a talk in Lorain, Ohio. It was Paul Kromer's home town,
so Wally was pouring out a tribute to the Wolverine senior halfback.
He told the Ohio folks about Kromer's great comeback, about his
fine run in the Ohio State game when he raced back a punt 79 yards
for a touchdown.
Most of the speech concerned the Lorain Tornado. Then out went the
lights and on came the pictures. They showed Michigan marching through
to its first touchdown. Finally it was time for Kromer's run.
"Now I will show you what I have promised you all evening, pictures of
your own Paul roaring around the entire Buckeye eleven," Weber explained
to his audience.
All was quiet. The film showed Scott punting the ball. The proud
Lorain folks looked on eagerly.
Then there was a cut, a black splotch on the screen, and Tommy Har-
mon kicking off for Michigan. Wally had taken the alumni movies to Lorain
instead of the team's own version. Kromer's run had- been cut from the
films. "Yeh," Weber pointed out, "sometimes they really make you look
silly. There I was, and there Kromer wasn't." He answered another phone

Lowrey Shifts
Forward Wall
For Mustangs1
Gillis And Lovett Move Up
To Starting Line; Kemp
Remains At Old Position
By ART HILL
Eddie Lowrey, Michigan hockey
coach, has always been somewhat of
an expert at juggling lineups and
this year he's going at it with a ven-
geance.
Last Saturday's opening game with
the London A.C., which the Wolver-
ines dropped by a 7-5 score, gave Ed-
die the first opportunity to see his
squad in action and he has a couple
of important changes planned for
next Saturday's tilt with the Univer-
sity of Western Ontario.
Johnny Gillis is set to move up to
the starting center spot, replacing

Varsity Cagers Have Speed To Burn,
TurnAgain To Fast-Breaking Offense'

By NORM MILLERI
If you're overtaken by dizzy spells
while watching the Wolverine basket-
ball team perform this season, don't
rush to the nearest doctor.
There's nothing wrong with your
constitution-it's merely the fast-
breaking, merry-go-round offense
that the Varsity is employing that's
causing your head to swim.
For, faced with the prospect of
a quintet with two short men, Cap-
tain Herb Brogan acd Mike Sofiak,
in key positions, and no one
shooting star whom the rest of the
cagers can "feed," Coach Bennie
Oosterbaan is once again drilling his
squad in the short-pass, fast-break,
and shoot often game.
Style Suits Varsity
There's plenty of speed in the Wol-
verine ranks, a wealth of team-work
and Oosterbaan's hoopmen appear to
have cottoned to that style of play-
ing like a duck to twater.
Once over the center line, the
guards set in motion a rotating of-
fense that resembles an extended ser-
ies of football reverses, and they keep
it going until one of the cagers has
shaken his opponent loose or a team
mate's screen has provided someone
with a shot at the hoop.
Nor are Oosterbaan's charges at
all bashful about shooting either. The
cagers never hesitate to let the ball
fly from any angle on the floor and
several of their baskets are of the
shooting circus variety.
Play Wide Open Game
The style seems to be made to
order for this year's edition of the
Michigan hoop team, and win or lose,
the Wolverines promise to provide
the fans with a speedy, wide open

Hoyas Accept
Bowl Invitation

brand of basketball this winter. Bob Fitzgerald at the forward posts.
Coach Oosterbaan's "A" team con- with Bill Cartmill and Bill Herr-
tinued to utilize the lightening-like .nann substituting.
offenseto good advantage at prac- Grissen Leads Scoring
tice yesterday afternoon as Capt. Brogan, who threw in four bas-
Brogan and his mates drubbed a kets and a pair of free throws, and
"B" team 46-28. Sofiak, with three double-deckers and
two foul shots. paced the "A" team's
.°:attack, but gridder Jim Grissen. play-
ing a guard position for the 'B"
squad, walked off with scoring hon-
A j4;ors for the day.

Once-Beaten
To Play In

4
i


Grissen took 11 shots at the hoop
during the lengthy one-hour scrim-
mage, and connected for six baskets I
and a foul for a total of 13 points.
Alumni Will Honor
Michigan Seniorsj
Another honor will be heaped on
one of the greatest Michigan football
teams in many years tonight when
the Detroit Alumni of the University
act as hosts to the squad at the an-
nual Fooball Bust. Gold "M" rings
will be presented to nine graduating
senior members of the team.
Those who will receive rings are
All-American Tom Harmon, Capt.
Forest Evashevski, Paul Kromer, Ed
Czak, Ed Frutig. Joe Rogers. Milo
Sukup, Ralph Fritz and Harry Kohl.

Geo rgeto Wn
iai lEt

MIAMI, Fla., Dec. 3-- -The
Orange Bowl Committee announced
tonight that Georgetown had accept-
ed an invitation to play Mississippi
State in the annual New Year's Day
football game here.
Gabe Murphy, graduate manager
of athletics at the Washington, D.C.,
school, telegraphed Georgetown's ac-
ceptance to Charles F. Baldwin,
Orange Bowl president.
The selection of Georgetown as
Mississippi State's opponent would
keep intact the Orange Bowl's un-
broken policy of making it a "North-
South" football game.
Only one point separated the Hoyas
from an unbeaten season, and that
lone defeat came at the hands of one
of the nation's best, Boston College,
19-18.
FRESHMAN TRACK
All first-year men interested in
trying out for the high jump, pole
vault, shot put, or discus throw
events on the freshman track
squad should report at 3:30 p.m.
today at Yost Field House.
- Chester Stackhouse,
freshman coach

CAPT. HERB BROGAN
Oosterbaan once again used Bro-
gan and George Ruehle at the guard
positions on the first stringers, Jim
Mandler at center" and Sofiak and

U B

FORMAL DRESS
H EADQUARTERS

We have a complete.
RENTAL DEPT.
TUXEDOS -
FULL DRESS
$3.50 and $4.00
an evening
TUXEDOS Retailing $27.50
FULL DRESS at $32,50
The VESTS at 4.50 and 5.50
Shirts-2.50 Tie's-85c and $1
Hosiery 35c arnd 5 0c-Susp. $1
Collars 35c-Studs, Links 50c up
Silk Scarfs $1.95 up.
The Downtown Store
for Michigan Men.
309 South'Main Street

call and went on :
"And that's not all. Michigan
had its best team in years and I
didn't get to see a Wolverine game
all season. Instead I spent Satur-
days scouting. I was all over the
nation looking at football teams.
But never Michigan."
Mrs. Weber and six-year old Mas-
ter Weber walked into the office. It
brought back memories of the roast
pork circuit.
"Aw, aw," spoke up Wally, "we got-
ta get going to Morenci tonight. This
thing goes on ad infinitum."
- 0
0 Michigan Seal "
ur, and
o Fraternity Crested L
J EW E LRY 0
0 0
! 0
0 Burr,Patterson & Auld 0
6 1209 South University 0
RUTH ANN OAKES 0
*000

JOHNNY GLLIS
Paul Goldsmith who injured his hand
in the London contest. Whether or
not Goldsmith will play at all is still
doubtful but it is very unlikely that
he will be able to see full-time service.
Jimmy Lovett is another boy who
earned a promotion by his play Satur-
day night. Lovett has moved up to
the starting front line along with
Gillis and sophomore Bob Kemp com-
pletes the trio. Kemp, playing his
first game of college hockey against
London, turned in a good perform-
ance and has retained his starting
job.
Capt. Charley Ross, who received a
bad gash in his cheek in the third
period of the opener, will probably
be back in the lineup in time for
the Western Ontario game and Bert
Stodden will once again be beside him
on the defense line. Hank Loud will
likely hold down the goalie's spot
once again, although sophomore
Hugh McVeigh is still very much in
the running for the job.
Saturday's game promises to be a
good one. The Mustangs are bring-

By STAN CLAMAGE
Man, oh man, why doesn't that guy
make up his mind! And what a man
this Rudy Sengel is-all six feet, two
inches of him packed with 215 pounds.
Yes, it's the same Rudy that caused
so much trouble last winter when he
couldn't make up his mind on wheth-
er to be a wrestler or a shot-putter.
Last year he appeased both sports by
dividing his time between them. But
Rudy knows that he must make up
his mind if he wants to go places in
either of them.
Working On Mat
Right now he is spending most of
his time on the wrestling mat, and
Coach Cliff Keen says "Rudy has
a world of potentialities, but needs
to learn and get into condition."
When "Butch" Jordon, last year's
captain and 1940 Big Ten Heavy-
weigth champ, graduated, Keen be-
gan to worry. But Sengel has a good
chance to blot out this worry. Last
ing a team sprinkled with veterans
and the two squads should be evenly
matched since Western dropped their'
opening contest to London A.C. by a
score of 8-5.
"It's a team I like to see on our
schedule," Coach Lowrey said last
night. "They always have a good
team. They're fast and rough but
they always play clean hockey and
the game should be close enough to be
interesting."

Rudy Sengel, Gridder, Wrestler
And Trackman, Faces Problem

year, he was all-campus heavyweight
champ.
Promising Shot-Putter
On the other side of the fence,
track coach Ken Doherty is waiting
and watching for developments. And
he has reason to't worry. Last year
Rudy put the 16 pound shot 45 feet
and 9 inches with only three weeks of
hard practice behind him. Doherty
says that with his fine physique he
has a good chance to do at least 50
feet. In high school Rudy broke the
Kentucky state shot-put record with
a heave of 52 feet for the 12 pound
shot. And that's not all.
On the side, Sengel plays a little
football by Fritz Crisler. But this
year he was handicapped with an an-
kle injury during most of the season.
When he played tackle in Kentucky
he washvoted one of the finest look-
ing prospects in the South.
Coin Will Decide
Right now Rudy says that he
doesn't know what he should do. "I'll
probably have to toss a coin todtell
what I'm going to do," Rudy said:
But he had better watch out just in
case Keen or Doherty tries to pull- a
fast one by substituting a trick coin
for the "real thing."
WRESTLING MANAGERS
All eligible sophomores and
juniors interested in trying out
for managership of the wrestling
team report to the Field House
balcony at 4:00 p.m. today.

O A GIFT f r o A
" we Serve to Serve Aat
309 SOUTH MAIN STREET
Is Always Appreciated by Men.
To hetp the student shopper
SWe suggest .. .
Neckwear Gloves Leather Jackets
Shirts Hosiery Rain Coats
Pajamas Jewelry Suits
Robes Pocket Books O'coats
Sweaters Handkerchiefs Topcoats
Mufflers Mackinaws Etc., Etc.
All Gifts Appropriately Boxed.
THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN
~m n & ISiI
ARROW SHIRTS are sold in downtown Ann Arbor at
Lindenschmidt & Apfel
209 South Main

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Who's Who at a House Party
THE CRINKLE CHEST (Every fraternity has one).
He's miserable enough with his ancient off-color
dress shirt, but when it buckles and leaves its

"I'll write my address on Jerry's cuff-
it doesn't take him an hour to find one."

mooring and goes
-r
dA

"crinkle crunch," he dies a
million deaths. ,
Since you can't keep him
locked in the cellar, tell him
about Arrow Shoreham, the
soft pleated bosom dress
shirt with the comfortable

Whether dancin' or romancin', Arrow dress
shirts improve your style. Campus favorites
are Kirk and Shoreham at $3 each.

semni-soft collar attached,
$3. See your Arrow dealer.
! TI _ sI1" T "

111 11

11

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