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December 01, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHTAN DATTSY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1940

'....::: ... 1 11 Li 111 1 V 11 1 l.)' 1- 1 \ S.D L' f 1 L' 1 " -

..,.__,_. _..,......._Y_._ ,., _~ _.,

Windt Expresses Admiration
For Former Campus Actress

Post-Season
Participation
Is-Undecided
(Continued from Page 1)

Common People Of Europe
Didn't Want War, Student Says

By HOMER SWANDER
"May Michigan have many more
like her!" Thus Valentine B. Windt,
Director of Play Productions, ex-
pressed his admiration and regard
for Martha Scott, '32, who has be-
come a famous actress both on
Broadway and in Hollywood.
While in school here at the Uni-
versity Miss Scott was very active
in Play Productions, Windt said. She
gave approximately 15 performances
in such plays as "Berkeley Square",
"Taming of the Shrew", "The Good
Hope" and "Marriage of Conveni-
ence".
From here the young actress went
on to the Detroit Civic Theatre and
from there to the Chicago World
Fair, where she played Shakespearean
roles for the Globe Theatre Company.
Before long Miss Scott found herself
making a hit on Broadway in the
production "Our Town". In fact she
did so well that she was chosen to
fill the lead in the Hollywood ver-
sion of the same play. Now she
has firmly entrenched herself in the
hearts of her fans all over the coun-

try-and especially in Michigan.
Mr. Windt had nothing but the
highest of praise for his former stu-
dent. She was always cooperative,
extremely hardworking and ambi-
tious, he said. "She has the type of
spirit and personality which makes
her live long in the memory of those
who are fortunate enough to work
with her," Windt added.
In a recent article in "Colliers"
Miss Scott accredited her success to
the help and encouragement given
her by Mr. Windt when she was here
at the University. When Windt was
questioned as to the reason for the
young star's rapid rise to fame, how-
ever, he said it was due to her sin-
cerity and simplicity. "She was al-
ways so genuine and unaffected,"
Windt emphasized. Without doubt
both views are correct-it took a
combination of them to achieve the
final result.
The finest thing about Miss Scott
is that she has not let her success
go to her head. She is still the same
lovable person she was when she was
a student here, Windt said.

(Continued from Page 1)

meeting. The bond retirement
brought to $650,000 the amount re-
tired since 1927, when the total bond-
ed indebtedness was $1,500,000. The
so-called "Stadium bonds" will be
retired in the next two months. The
action was in line with a policy fol-
lowed since a period of expansion
immediately after 1927 saw the
Sports and Women's Athletic Build-
ings erected as part of the Universi-
ty's magnificent athletic plant.
Action On Cross Country
Favorable action was also taken on
a request from Varsity Track Coach
Ken Doherty for an opportunity to
enter members of his squad in the
cross-country event held each fall.
The board's approval did not reestab-
lish cross-country as a sport, but will
merely allow Doherty to enter men
from the group which participates
each fall as a conditioning measure.
Final action of the board approved
a 40-cent admission charge for stu-
dents at swimming meets and hockey
games, and admission upon presenta-
tion of identification cards at basket-
ball games and track meets.
k'

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

II

By ROBERT SPECKHARD t
"The rulers of the European coun-
tries, not the common people. draggedI
those countries into the conflict that
now rages there," commented Bill
Clark, '42, summarizing the exper-
iences of being shuffled all over the
continent for eleven months when
war broke out in September of '39.
Bill was one of the two Michigan
students who were to study at the
American University in Beirut, Syria,
as part of the exchange of students
between the two institutions. Ismail
Khalidi, Grad, and Fakhri Maluf,
Grad, are the two representatives of
the American University now on
campus, the latter being just recently
sentenced to a 15-year prison term in
absentia by the new French govern-
ment for political activity.
Clark arrived in Plymouth, Eng-
land, on July 20, 1939. "After visit-
ing London and Canterbury, where I
saw workmen already removing the
stain glass windows of that famous
cathedral, I went on to Amsterdam,
Holland, as an Episcopalian delegate
to the World Conference of Christian
Youth," Bill related.
"1500 youth of all denominations,
hailing from 70 different nations,
there pledged themselves to perpetual
brotherhood, only one month before
Europe was to be thrown into bit-
ter warfare," Bill recounted. At the
conference Bill overheard a remark
between a boy from the Balkans and
a French boy that was to characterize
the sentiment of the people he ques-
tioned all over the continent. "Al-
CORRECTION:
No, there aren't 11,952 freshmen
in the University-nor were there
12,098 students in the class of
1943; despite the statements to
that effect published in yester-
day's edition of The Daily.
The figures, quoted from a re-
port which was released recently
by the Statistical Division of the
Registrar's Office, referred to to-
tal enrollment in the University
this year (11,952) and last year
(12,098).
The record enrollment referred
to by the reporter was that of the
school year 1939-40, not that of
the class of '43. The 1.2 percent
decrease in enrollment mentioned
indicated that the all-University
figure had dropped, not that pres-
ent sophomores outnumbered the
class of '44.

though our countries will probably
be at war for a few months," said
the boy from the Balkans, "we shall
always remain friends."
In Germany on his way to Syria,
Bill spent several days with three
youthful German aviators who had
fought for Franco in Spain for 18
months. "They told me they had no
quarrel with the Spanish people,"
Bill said, "but as all good army men
they must obey orders." The im-
minence of war forced Bill to leave
for Paris.
"The French capital was a beehive
of activity," Clark related, "for all
Paris expected that the city would
be bombed the first night of the war.
Soldiers were leaving for the front
while other trains carried women and
children to the provinces. The line-
up before the gas-mask dispensary
was five blocks long."
When the war was actually de-
clared on Sept. 3 Bill went to Dinard,
Brittany and spent three months as
a volunteer workman on a farm near-

by, helping out a widow and her
19-year-old daughter, whose brothers
had been called to the front. Christ-
mas was spent with an English fam-
ily in Dinard; Bill has only recent-
ly learned that one son of his host
was killed with the R.A.F. over Bel-
gium and that the other now resides
a prisoner in a German internment
camp.
In January Bill went to Paris once

more when passport regulations were
changed. "There I met a number of
Czech boys who had escaped their
Nazi occupied homeland," Bill re-
counted. "Some intended to join the
French army while others hoped to
continue their studies. All of them
were barely able to exist on the very
small funds that were provided, a
portion of which was provided by
American students through the
agency of the World Student Service
Fund."
In Italy, on his way to Beirut, Bill
reported signs forbidding political
discussions. A barber who cut his
hair told him that Freud s works were
banned because he was Jewish. In
January of this year Bill arrived at
the University, one semester late.
At the University Bill studied un-

I

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"Let me help
you make your
CHRISTMAS
VACATION

PLANS"

P,

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der American. Armenian. English and
Egyptian professors, the latter being
a good friend of Prof. William Fran-
kena of our own philosophy depart-
ment., who studied at Harvard Uni-
versity at the same time.

11

-'

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HELP WANTED
TUTORING can bring returns by
using classified advertising. Rea-
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igan Daily. 125
TRANSPORTATION - 21
WANTED-Driving to San Antonio
and way points for Xmas vacation.
One way. Want companions. Call
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141
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REWARD for return of two note-
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Call 8974-Bishop. 143
TYPING-18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-

Men's

Glee Club

Will Hold Special
Rehearsal Today
A special rehearsal for their scene
in this year's Union Opera will be
held by the Varsity Men's Glee Club,
4 p.m. today in the Union.
All student members have been
urged to attend by Charles Brown,
'41, president, since the "Take A
Number" songsawill beintroduced at
this time by an opera committee.
Prof. David Mattern, of the School of
Music, will conduct the group, which
will be accompanied by their regular
pianist Jack Osserwaarde, Grad.
Plans will also be discussed for the
Glee Club's last night of fall sere-
nading on Thursday. Their tour of
sorority houses and dormitories will
complete campus serenading until the
spring.

Does Nazi Germany allow a margin for error
"Margin For Eror
A SATIRICAL ANTI-NAZI MELODRAMA
by CLARE BOOTHE (Author of "The Women")
THE CRITICS SAID:
Richard Lockridge: "Sheer glee ... chuckles . .. Excitement .
tension . . . Laughter."
John Anderson: "The most satisfying likeness of official German.
ferocity that we have yet had on the stage."
Burns Mantle: "3 stars . . . taut . . . tricky and entertaining."
John Mason Brown:" . . . delightful mastery of the wisecrack."
Brooks Atkinson: ". . . ludicrous situations .. . hilarious satire lines."
Walter Winchell: "My favorite show . . . skillful murder mystery
...By all means go."
PLAY PRODUCTION
of the Speech Deportment
WEDNESDAY through Saturday, Dec. 4, 5, 6, 7.
Box Office open Monday (Phone 6300)
Prices: 75c, 50c, 35c Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

"I'm you long distance
telephone operator. I
can connect you with your

f olks at home, your
friends anywhere, so you
can complete definite va-
cation plans with them,
personally, promptly. And
it costs so little to tele-
phone, especially SUN-
DAYS and ANY NIGHT
AFTER 7 O'CLOCK,
when rates to most places
are reduced. For rates to
points not shown below,
see page 5 in the telephone
directory or dial "O" and
ask me."
Rates for 3-minute
night and Sunday
station-to-station
calls . . . Ann Arbor to:

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KENM

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a
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"r
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nard St., phone 5689.

9c

Albion
Allegan
Alpena

TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14
VIOLA STEIN- Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland,
LAUNDERING -9
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. 10c
FOR SALE
PERSONAL STATIONERY - 100,
sheets, 100 envelopes, printed with
your name and address-$1.00.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard St. 12c
FOR RENT
WANTED-College couple to act as
landlords for part payment of rent
on nice apartment. Call Mrs.
Cady, 9829. 145
FOR RENT-Suite with private bath
and shower. Also double with
adjoining lavatory-steam heat-
Phone 8544, 422 E. Washington.
140
Read The Daily Classifieds

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