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November 19, 1940 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-11-19

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.TWo

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, -NOVIE DES19, 1940.

__ .. ._a .__-.-- _ __,..

Barbirolli To Lead Philharmonic
In Choral Union Concert Sunday

John Barbirolli will conduct the
world-famous New York Philharmonic
Symphony Orchestra in their second
Choral Union Concert at 3 p.m. Sun-
day in Hill Auditorium.
The University Musical Society has
arranged the afternoon performance
so that a world-wide broadcast may
take place from the Hill Auditorium
stage at the Philharmonic's usual
hour. Deems Taylor, music annota-
tor, will speak at intermission time
from his New York studio.
The oldest symphony orchestra in
the UnitedsStates and the third old-
est in the world, the New York Phil-
harmonic is noted for its policy of
following the trends of classical music
as to present day popularity. The
program Sunday will bear this tradi-
tion out, since the growing favorite
Sebeleius' work will be featured.
Conductor Barbirolli, born in Eng-
land of Latin parents, not only comes.
from a musical family, but has also
had the advantage of starting his
own music studies at the age of seven.
Since then he has studied with the
masters of Europe, and has conducted
the London Symphony Orchestrag
the Royal Philharmonic Society Con-
certs, the International Opera Sea-
son at Covent Garden, the Scottish
Orchestra, and the Leeds Symphony.
Many stories are told of Barbir-

olli's remarkable memory. Among
them is the incident of the premier of
Bax's "Overture," "Elegie" and "Ron-
do" with the Royal Philharmonic
Society. The work was to be played
from a manuscript, the only copy
in existence, and the day before the
rehearsal Barbirolli lost the music.
Reluctant to tell the composer, he
sat up all night constructing a skele-
ton score from memory. The com-
position was rehearsed, corrected and
performed before the composer was
told of the loss.
Tickets for the concert may still
be obtained at the University Musi-
cal Society offices in the Burton
Tower.
To Give Golf Lessons
The weekly meeting of the spe-
cial course in golf instruction
sponsored by the University Ex-
tension Service will be held at 5
p.m. tomorrow in the Women's
Athletic Building.
The course, which offers indi-
vidual instruction for beginners
and advanced students, is being
offered without credit during the
next eight weeks. Mrs. Violet
Handy will be the instructor, and
emphasis will be placed on individ-
ual teaching.

Speech Group
To Hear Talk
By Morrison
Sigma Rho Tau Presents
Speech On Development
Of Road Construction
Prof. Roger L. Morrison of the
transportation engineering depart-
ment will address a meeting of Sigma
Rho Tau, honorary engineering
speech society, at 7:30 p.m. today in
the Union on "Selling Highways."
In his talk Professor Morrison will

Ann Arbor

Conant To Edit'
Naval 'Polaris'

Here Is Today's
In Summary

News

Newest Campus
To Be Issued

Magazine
Friday

A spectator at the Northwestern
game Saturday who threw a whiskey
bottle down into the stands which
struck Mrs. Jane Ogden of Detroit
on the back of the head pleaded
guilty before Justice Jay H. Payne
yesterday.
The spectator, Wayne U. Taylor of
Mansfield, O., was sentenced to pay a
fine of 57 dollars or go to jail for 60
days. He paid the fine.
Mrs. Ogden was taken to St. Jos-
eph Hospital where the cuts on her
head were treated. She was later re-
leased to go home and was advised to
see her family doctor.
Police arrested 16 fans on drunk
and disorderly charges during and
after the game. It was estimated that
this exceeded the total arrests at all
previous home games this year.
Despite the unusually heavy traffic
over the weekend, no serious injuries
were reported to the police or sher-
iff's office. There were 20 acci-
dents over the weekend in and around
Ann Arbor.
Frank H. Warren, chief of police
of Ann Arbor from 1901 to 1903, died
yesterday in Seattle, according to
word received here. Warren was ap-
pointed chief by the late Dr. Royal
S. Copeland, one-time mayor of Ann
Arbor and later a U.S. Senator from
New York. The police force at that
time, according to Patrolman George
Camp who is making a study of the
department's history, numbered four
men.
The Ann Arbor Post Office an-
nounced yesterday that no postal sta-
tions will be kept open on Thursday
because of, the Thanksgiving holiday,
and has urged all students to post
their letters well in advance of that
date to insure delivery over the week-
end.
The last mail will be collected 5:30
p.m. on Wednesday, and the first mail
collected on Thursday at 10:30 a.m.
No mail will be delivered on Thursday
either.

Rabbi Kaplan To' Leeture Here

James Conant, '44, has been ap-
pointed to succeed John Robbins, '44E,
as editor-in-chief of the Michigan
Polaris, official Naval ROTC maga-
zine, which will make its second ap-
pearance of the year Friday.
The magazine, which is the newest
publication on the campus, will be
devoted to Thanksgiving and a special
page will be set aside to describe the
day as it is celebrated in the navy.
Other features include an article on
the volunteer naval reserve, a short
story on new equipment which will
be obtained by the local NROTC unit,
several cartoons and humorous poems.
Assisting Conant on the staff are
Nelson Upthegrove, '44E, managing
editor, and associate editors Keith
Nichols, '44, Jack Brown, '44, Norris
Post, '44, and Mason Fenwick, '44.
- --- - -

Rabbi Mordecai M. Kaplan, one of
the foremost philosophers of JudaismI
in America, will speak at 4:15 p.m.
today at Rackham Amphitheatre.
Rabbi Kaplan. who is the second
speaker on the Hillel Forum Series,
will lecture on the subject "The Jew-
ish Religion for Tomorrow."
He is the leader of the new Re-
constructionist Movement to elimin-
ate the archaic parts of the Jewish
religion and revise the symbols of
Judaism so that they may have
meaning to the people of the twen-
tieth century.

#%®, ..

Rabbi Kaplan's interpretation of
Judaism is based not on a religious.
racial, cultural or nationalistic con-
ception, but on the idea that Judaism
is a civilization.
Besides being well known as a phil-
osopher, lecturer and teacher, Rabbi
Kaplan is a noted author. Some of
his more recent works are "The Mean-
ing-of God in Modern Jewish Relig-
ion," "Judaism as a Civilization" and
"Judaism in Transition."
The first speaker on the Hillel For-
um Series was Waldo Frank the noted
author.

DAILY at 2-4-7-9 P.M.
2-4 P.M. 25c

I

NOW PLAYING!

I

;..a - . r"" #t . h- t",.,.n .
at the
Bill Sawyer's MUsic
MICHIGAN UNION
Wednesday 9:30Oto 1:00 $1.00 acouple

h.

I

CLASsIFIED ADVERTISING

Lit.r

I --

WANTED-TO BUY-4
WANTED-Four6tickets to O.S.U.
game. Phone 6814. 115
TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL --
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 5c
LOST and FOUND
LOST-Sterling silver rosebud brooch.
Call Martha Cook-Room 313-
2-3225. Reward. 116
WILL THE person who exchanged
coats at The Colonade Sunday,
9-10, cell Pete Murray-8578. 117
LOST at Stadium-a brown wallet.
Owner H. Whittaker. Return to
R. Otis. Phone 9720. Reward. 118
LOST-Women's Elgin watch-near
Geddes Road or Mosher Jordan.
Reward. Barbara Moore, Jordan
Hall-2-4561. 119
LOST-Black leather billfold on
Maynard near East Liberty. Re-
turn to A. Bobrowsky, 520 E. Wil-
Liam. Reward. 111
LOST-Girls' gray traveling bag.
Washtenaw Ave. just outside Ypsi-
lanti in' accident. Reward. Phone
Lord, 2-4509. 114
FOR RENT
TYPEWRITER for rent. Month or
semester. Cheap. 402 W. Liberty.
Phone 4619. 110
LAUNDERING-9

FOR SALE
CHRISTMAS CARDS-The largest'
selection in town. All imprinted
with your name. From 50 for $1.00
up. Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.
lic
MISCELLANEOUS -20
GRACE POWERS' Nursery School-
Ages 11/2 to 4. 315 E. William St.
Phone 8293. 25
BEN THE TAILOR-More money for
your clothes-good clothes for sale.
122 E. Washington. 1c
ALTERATIONS and dressmaking -
Reasonable. Mrs. G. Sturgis, 1508
Geddes. Phone 2-4296. 109
MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 So.
State. 19c
USED CLOTHING-bought and sold.
Claude H. Brown, 512 S. Main St.
Phone 2-2756. 17c
EXPERT HOSIERY and garment re-
pair. Reasonable rates, Weave-Bac
Shop-Upstairs in Nic~kels Arcade.
13c
NEWS and NOTICES for clubs, fra-
ternities and sororities. Edwards
Letter Shop, 711 N. University,
Phone 2-2846. 4c
TYPING-18
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN- Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.

PROF. MORRISON
trace the history of road development,
some of the trends toward the new
super highways and the effects of
over-selling them.
One of the pioneers in modern road
development, he did much of his work
while a professor at Texas A.&M.
from 1914 to 1919 traveling through-
out the state giving speeches for im-
proved highways and aiding the var-
ious road construction boards.
Professor Morrison is well known
to the members of the "Stump Speak-
ers' Society" serving last year as
chairman of its annual Tung Oil
Banquet. Several years ago he was
the winner of the Tung Oil Crown,
given to the member of the faculty
who gives the best Sigma Rho Tau
after-dinner speech.
Triangles To Meet Today
Triangles, honorary engineering so-
ciety, will hold a short business meet-
ing at 5:30 today, to be followed by a
supper meeting at 6, Robert Wallace,
'42E, announced yesterday.
"H A RD-TO-GET-TO" PEOPLE
Te leqrapl
CHARGES FOR TELEGRAMS
'PHONED IN APPEAR ON YOUR
TELEPHONE BILL.

11

I

Extra
Information Please
Diary of a Racing Pigeon
Cartoon - News

!I

Thursday
ANN SOTHERN "DULCY"

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.- _ . - . - - -.w-- ---err- - .---.^. ' -:-. _+ .- - .- _. -. .-
_ L . 1 . . ._ ,.ice ..i .. i.... L _.i ... i ...

I

.s

LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darne
Careful work at low price. 3
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 22
South First St. Phone 3916. 1
STUDENT BUNDLES-3 shirts,
pairs of sox, 6 handkerchiefs fin
ished; 2 suits underwear, 2 bat
towels, 1 pajama suit fluffed - 99
Ace Hand Laundry, 1114 S. Un
versity. 1

'd.
3c

u-
2
0O
3
n-
5c

Price List
(All articles washed and ironed)
SILVER LAUNDRY
607 Hoover Phone 5594
Free pickups and deliveries
Shirts.....................14
Undershirts................04
Shorts..................... .04
Pajama Suit;................10
Socks, pair ................. .03
Handkerchiefs.............. .02
Bath Towels ............... .03
All Work Guaranteed
Also special prices on Coeds'
laundries. All bundles done sep-
argtely. No markings. Silks,
wwl- are our specialty.

36
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3
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-g -
/
SS
A~
"Now with the Help of MICHIGAN DAILY
ADVERTISERS there's nothing for me to do except
look pretty-A Merry Christmas Indeed"
And it is only necessary to see the variet y of gifts that the merchants have already
stocked to understand how Santa feels. Since classes this year continue through
c.20,leavingyou but two shopping days in your home town, the ll shops re.
equipped as never before to satisfy your needs. Profit from this wide selection by
shopping early with the timely gift suggestions in the Michigan Daily as your giude.
ADVERT4SER ther'snong ormetodoexet=

6' : '
T

MICHIGAN
Now Playing

IF-

YOU WOULD MAKE THAT PARTY
A REAL SUCCESS - BE SURE YOU
HAVE A GOOD-
tzahce /&rnd

Funierthan "I Love You Win"!to
pTIRD 11HGtR.

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