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November 06, 1940 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDA
I

Man Decrees

Jerkin Makes EnsembleFormal Skirts
Should Be Ful

.:

I T

Practical Togs
For Women
Plea Is Issued For Common
Sense In Wearing Knee Socks,
Rubber Boots, Kerchiefs, Hats
By J. BASCOMB SLINK XXVIH
Fashions are silly stuff, aren't they?
Yes, indeed, people go around wear-
ing weird looking things like vege-
tables on their hats for no other reas-
on than that some foolish woman in
New York or Paris says that vege-
table-covered heads are chic. Bah!
Prime consideration in any choice
of apparel should be practicability -
is it worth the price? How will it
look on me? Entirely secondary should
be the element of whether the coat
will be "a la mode." -
And, best of all, they are putting
common, workaday things on an 'oh-
my - dear - you - simply- have - to - have
-one basis. Still, no small amount of
care is needed in picking out which
ones of fashion's decrees to ratify
and which to repeal.
For instance, there is the question
of these horrid looking rubber boots
that are making numerous appear-
ances around the University these
days. Ghastly things, aren't they?
But they keep the feet dry and the
stocking clean and that's some con-
solation and no little reason for their
existence. Our fasion experts, strug-
gling against the impracticable, have
turned to the ugly in an attemppt to
forget the frilly-but-useless things of
yesteryear.
Then, on the same subject, we have
the matter, of the wool stockings af-
fected by so many girls of late, the
stockings that are long reaching near-
ly to the knee. Some girls claim that
their legs, their legs and no other
legs, look good in them. That is
a lot of nonsense.
But those long stockings keep the
delicate little legs, those delectable
little gams, warm in the midst of
winter's cruel blasts. Okay, girls,
which'll it be: warm legs and bilious
swains ,or numbed limbs and delight-
ed males?
And another matter of practicabil-
ity is the question of 'the kerchiefs.
They are reportedly excellent for
maintaining the permanent part of
a permanent wave. That is lovely.
How Do You Look?
Some girls look nice in them., Some
girls. But not the dear little chubby
kids with pumpkin faces. Another

I

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This attractive jerkin with its
colored beaded pockets can be worn
with a classic, black date dress or
with dressy wools.
thing, regardless of the shape of your
face, young lady, your kerchief should
be chosen with some slight regard to
coloring. Red faced gals should avoid
green head covers; green faced gals
should . . . Really, some slight re-
gard for color schemes is essential -
in the kerchief itself and in the rela-
tion of the kerchief to the wearer's
complexion and other clothes.
Well, all that's common sense
sure, it's common sense, but that is
the absent quality when matters of
fashion come up. And that applies
not only to long stockings and rub-
ber boots and kerchiefs. It applies to
every article that ever adorned a
female chassis. Male too, only we're
not picking on them today.
By the way, while we're still on
the 'topic of fashions and old-fash-
ioned horse sense, a word in regard to
the time and place elements might
not be amiss. Girlies, please suit your
costume to the occasion. You would-
n't - hope not, anyhow - go to
J-Hop in saddle shoes and a sweater'n
'skirt outfit. No, but some of you plas-
ter yourselves right up on the stage
at Choral Union affairs thusly at-
tired. And, believe the audience, you
look like heck. (Use of the word "h--1"
- synonymous to Hades - is forbid-
den.)
Common sense, babes, that's all it
takes.
Orientation Advisors
Women who have petitioned for
Orientation Advisorships for next
year will be called by the League.
Women need not call themselves.

Bodices And Skirts May Glitter
Of Metallic Thread, Spangles;
By KAY NORTON
Whether you choose a "sweet"
full-skirted net gown or one with
slim or draped lines of heavier ma-
terial in more brilliant colors to wear
to those fall formals, you will be
equally correct in the eyes of the
fashion world, although the full-skirt-
ed dress is proving more popular on
the college campuses.
The dress just mentioned comes
in net or tulle of white or pastels,
waist line may follow the new torso
styles of street clothes and end at
the hip or may be high and fitted;
the skirts, however, are always very
full. Many of the dresses partially
imitate that new "covered up" look
by having little puff sleeves but the
bodices are usually cut quite low.
Of course the sleeveless gown for
very formal wear is being shown a
great deal in this type of formal. The
designers have added 'sparkle' to them
by decorating the bodices and occas-
ionally even the skirt with spangles
and metallic thread.
White Is Favorite
A typical example of the type of
dress just described is of white net,
always a leading favorite, with a high
waist line and yards and yards of
skirt. It has tiny puff sleeves and a
bodice that is cut quite low and
shaped like the top of a heart. It
is decorated with tiny designs of
silver spangles which should make it
sparkle delightfully at night. Cer-
tainly any girl could feel romantic in
a 'southern belle' manner in such a
dress.
Crepe Stresses Slimness
As for the pencil slim dresses or
those with draped lines, they are us-
ually in crepe or in such materials.
They definitely stress the 'covered
up' style, many of them having long
sleeves and high necks. They may
be in black accented by some color
or in brilliant colors or in dark colors
with metallic accessories.
A formal that illustrates this style
very well is a high-necked, long
sleeved one with perfectly straight
lines except for two pleats on each
side of the front. It was of an un-
usual blue shade with a panel of
flame between the pleats. It is very
striking, very unusual and would
make the wearer appear to be the
height of ophisication.

Ff4SHTOR
by JcC

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FASHION FANTASY

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BRIGHT
SUEDES
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Casual smartness for winter
. . . in all the gay football
colors. Gold, Kelly, Red, Blues
and Browns.

KNOW WHERE TO GO*
for clothes that are tops in style and usefulness.
Our fall selections are designed to outfit you
perfectly twenty-four hours a day, every day.
Don't miss our showings in the Daily Fashion
Show, November 7.
CASAE
I NNI-
Eke&
4
.. POMPADOUR

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Come and see the gayest, most exciting show ever
to come to town! "Pompadour," the young, little
"KEG HEEL" pump with the square toe! "Castanet",
the syncopating "BOOMPS TOE" spectator! Just

$4.95

l1

Presented by:
The Michigan Daily and Ann Arbor
> Merchants. Thursday, Nov. 7 at 4:15 P.M.
THE MICHIGAN THEATER
Bill Gail's Orchestra

two of our many headliners! Admission is free . .
so step right up ladies!

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