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October 30, 1940 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-30

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PrAOIlHRU

Wolverine Grid Squad Again Rated Third In Nation

ai Poll

m

Deposed Vitt
Saw Writing
On The Wall
Former Cleveland Pilot
Expected Club's Move,
Has No Hard Feelings
OAKLAND, Calif., Oct. 29-(A)-
Oscar Vitt, who lost his job as mana-
ger of the Cleveland IndiansMonday.
said he was "not surprised at the de-
cision.",
The deposed pilot said he had noth-
ing in sight but would remain in base-
ball if inducements were satisfactory.
"Naturally I realized this was com-
ing," Vitt said at his home herem "It
would have been necessary to mak
changes in the playing personnel at
the time of the trouble. The changes
were not made so I saw the hand-
writing on the wall. As it now stands.
I am just as well satisfied to sever
connections with the club."
He said he was not interested in
a minor league berth unless "finan-
cial tems are suitable."
Vitt added he "had no hard feel-
ings" against Alva Bradley, president
of the club and other officials. "I
gave them all I had. My conscience is
clear. I hven't a thing in sight. I
figured I was still an employe of th
club until advised differently, so I
did pot- go scouting around for new
connections. From what I read in the
newspapers, however, my bosses were
shopping around while I was still an
employe.
"Whoever gets the job has my best
wishes ;- also my sympathy."
Fletcher Hall Beats
Tyler Gridmen, 6-0
Highlighting a day of adverse wea-
ther and poor playing conditions,
Fletcher Hall defeated Tyler House
6-0 yesterday to win the League One
Dormitory touch football champion-
ship. Climaxing a 50 yard drive down
the field late in the fourth quarter,
Walt Fish, Fletcher Hall back, shot
a beautiful pass Ato Arnold Larsen,
who scored.
The only other touch football game
was won by Prescott House, which
defeated Greene House 6-0. Russ
Brown tallied the lone touchdown
on a pass from Walt Graf.
Led by John Pierson, Acacia de-
feated Phi Sigma Kappa 113 in an
Interfraternity speedball game. Kap-
pa Nu won the only other game
scheduled on a forfeit from Sigma Nu.
FRESHMAN CAGERS
All tryouts for the freshman bas-
ketball team report at 7:30 p.m.
Monday at Waterman Gymnasi-
um. "Bring your own equipment.
Ray Fisher, Coach
SC >om scon c:
FOR THAT
NEXT FORMAL PARTY c
V TRY OUR 9}
FULL DRESS V
AND
° TUXEDO R ENTAL
DEPARTMENT
Oh Yes, We Also Rent
The Accessories.
Walk a ew Stes & Save Dollars
ERNIE KUOHN'S 0
Clothes Shop

1Z2 E. Liberty Phone 8020 u
On the corner next to the P. Bell
60<;;; o ;;;;;;;o 04;;;;;>a

Husky End Adds Power

To Reserves

Sports Editors G
Gridmen Howl
Award Cornell

As Coaches

. . . . . . . .

PuffJ

First

Position By GERRY SCHAFLANI)ER Forest Evashevski, and Davie Nelson, Chunky Milo Sukup was the only
Michigan's football team hollered who were the recipients of minor in- man not in uniform, reporting a
for its rights in a big way yesterday juries Saturday, all dressed and par- steady headache which had been re-
Ten Elevenis afternoon at Ferry Field. The squad ticipated in the complete workout yes- ceived in the Illinois game and hasn't
bra n. Fb very simply went on strike, present- terday- let up since.

Trio Of Big
G (st S 4 t I

Notre Dame Is Second
NEW YORK, Oct. 29.-'-It was

the East against the Middle West to-
day in the third week of the Associat-
ed Press football ranking poll, with
Cornell continuing as top choice for
No. 1 team cf the season and Notre
Dame, Michigan and Minnesota fur-
nishing the toughest competition in
that 'order.
Carl Snavely's Big Rled team, win-
ner over Ohio State last Saturday by
the biggest score run up against the
Buckeyes in seven years, got 81%
first-place votes out of 160 for a total
of 1,461.5 points. But the Ithacans
had their margin more than cut in
half from a week ago, Notre Dame
improving its runner-up position by
slicing the Cornell lead from 321
points to 146.
The Irish, winning 40 first-place
votes and second on 46 ballots to
Cornell's 48, had better than a hun-
dred-point edge over Michigan, with
1,208, and almost 300 over fourth-
place Minnesota, with 1,044.
The Gophers, off their game this
week, have the best chance to better
their standing or take a sleighride,
while Cornell is meeting Columbia,
which doesn't look up to giving the
Big Red the scare it did last year.
Notre Dame is meeting Army, winner
over Williams, and Michigan is tak-
ing a day off. Minnesota will tangle
with Northwestern, another all-win-
ning Western Conference teamn which
ranks eighth in the opinion of the
nation's experts and is due to be
strengthened by the returnof Bill De-
Correvont.
FRESHMAN BOXERS
All freshmen interested in box-
ing report at 4:30 p.m. today at
Waterman Gymnasium.
Vern Larson, Boxing Coach

i

ing the following ultimatum to the
coaching staff:
It flatly refused to start practice
until the coaches present ran several
laps around the length of the grid-
iron.I
Squad Enjoys Performance
It seems that the boys wanted the
staff to appreciate how hard they
were working, and felt that a dose
of the same medicine that had been
dished out to them for such a long
time, would be just the thing. It was,
and the squad howled until tears were
pouring off, or from, their respective
ducts, at such an excellent and enjoy-
able performance.
Coaches Crisler andMartineau were
the only ones present and trotted
through their paces as well as their
girths allowed. Crisler stood up un-
der the ordeal in fine fashion, but
Marty was a bit tuckered out. He
came into the home stretch all tied
up, puffing like an inveterate nico-
tine inhaler.
Marty Softens Up
Marty will never bark out that
"come on, keep moving, you cream
puffs," with the same sort of author-
ity and sarcasm as of old. His men
are liable to go on strike at the drop
of a hat. It's either a choice of get-
ting into playing shape, or holding
back on the vitriolic cracks, for the
likeable Wolverine backfield coach.
Al Wistert, Reuben Kelto, Capt.

SHOWING AMERICA'S FINEST

s
fi 8 ,A
.Ul
' t
S }
}

FINGER-TIP COATS
and MACKINAVS
Wool, Gabardine, and Corduroys.
Shades of Tan's blue - Teal green,
Maroon - Brown - etc.
Zipper and Button Models
SPECIALLY PRICED
~ and *9*
THE DOWNTOWN STORE
FOR MICHIGAN MEN

Harlin "Whitey" Fraumann, junior reserve end, has proven to be a
capabhe replacement for Joe Rogers on the flank. His rugged style of
play and natural physical assets make him an ideal wingman, and adds
strength to the Wolverine reserve power.
Harmo n Finds.No Private Life
As An All-American Halfback

-Wie Serve to Serve Aadin,
300 SOUTk MAIN STrEET

1

i
v

By WOODY BLOCK
"Glory--but no peace."
That's the life of Michigan's All-
American, Tom Harmon. No one in
these parts has ever tucked a football
under his arm, set two muscular legs
in motion and scampered off with
the headlines as Coach Crisler's dur-
able halfback.,,
Ever since the season opened, and
even before that, the name of Har-
mon was flashed from coast to coast.
And now that the popular Wolverine
has worn a path down the middle of
every turf he's stepped on, that name
and his number '98' is news no mat-
ter what he does.
Fans Love Winner
"I guess they make all this fuss
because everybody loves a winner,"
Tom explained. "Fans have been
sending me from 10 to 15 letters every
day requesting pictures, and auto-
graphs, and right now I'm about 100
behind."
"The prize of the whole bunch came
the other day," Harmon went on. "It
was from some agent who was ready
to guarantee me $75,000 in my first
three years under his management."
Besides the fan mail he gets, which
is probably the least troublesome of
his requests, Tom has to pose for
newspaper photographers and news-
reel men from morning to night.
Registers Three Times
They get him when he's practicing,
when he's studying, when he's out on
a date and they even forced him to
register three times for the draft.
Those who don't or can't read the
papers and magazines get the Har-
mon personality over the radio. Be-
sides innumerable interviews over De-
troit stations, the Hoosier Hammer
appeared on two nation-wide hookups,
the Williams Shaving Cream and, the
Eveisharp Pencil programs.
Tom has already received 10 re-
quests to various banquets, but he's
accepted only one. That one is for
NBCaster Bill Stern's Sport Show,

.. NEW

,STYLES FIRST AT WILD'S ,.

Nov. 29. He's going to fly there and
back.
No one has asked him to endorse a
breakfast cereal, shaving cream or
hair tonic yet, he' laughingly ad-
mitted, but "that will probably come
later.".
Makes Full Schedule
So it goes, day after day. Football
practice and studying are jammed in
between interviews, posing for pic-
tures, radio broadcasts, a job distrib-
uting chewing gum and keeping up a
mounting correspondence.
All-American Tom has found out
that he is a walking news-item. Ey-
erywhere he goes and everything he
does is under the closest scrutiny.
That's the life of being an All-Ameri-
can. Lots of glory bpt no peace.
UNIVERSITY GOLF COURSE
The University Golf Course will
close for the 1940 season, Sunday,
Nov. 3. Those having locker
space at the club are requested to
remove their clubs before that
,date.
H. T. Rogers, Mgr.

,I

SMART NIGHT LFE IN..
EQUA4&HL IVEAR
6y 1Wild & Co.

r

'i

1-11

PLEDGE
FORMALS
PROGRRMS
FfRVORS
PfRT Y PL RNS
See
Ruth Ann Oakes
at
BURR PATTERSON & AULD
1209 South "U."

;: ,
- 1

' ..
,,
...

r
NOW

L 1'

s
I
!7 /
4 ... . ..........

TR"IPLE BECKER
era"& Ye e7-4

~,
Beefing about the weather won't help. Our beefy
Walk-lOvers will. A cushion of crepe rubber between
two leather soles blocks out cold, dampness. Softens
sidewalks. BROADWAY. Deep-dye Antiqued calf.'$9.5/!

How we love to see a well-dressed man in Formal Wear. That's when you should
be at your very smartest . . . comfortable . . casual . . . smooth looking! So,
select your Formal Wear from a Istore who knows style, who talks style, who
sells nothing but style. Wild's Formal Wear has the same soft, casual tailoring
. . . the same lapel details . . . the same deep-fold, pleated trousers with
wide knees and narrow bottoms . . . the same fashion points that has made them
the Pacemakers for Arm Arbor.
Club Royal Topcoat . . . . . . $35.00
Full Dress . . . . . $27.50 to $45.00
Tuedos . . . . . . $25.00 to 845.00

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