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October 25, 1940 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-25

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY. 4)(70131"It 251 19,10

THkICIA fAL

FRIDAY, OCTOBER Z5, 194G

Men's Dorms
Announce New
House Officers
Michigan, Allen-Rumsey
Lloyd, Williams Plan
Final Election Monday
Results of the West Quadrangle
elections Monday were made public
last night +by Mr. Charles Peake,
chief resident adviser. Four houses
conducted final elections and four
halls held primaries. .
Erwin Coveny, '44, was elected
president of Adams House; Wes Pe-
ters, '42E, was chosen vice-president;
Charles Booth, '44, secretary; Bob
Lapp, '43E, treasurer; Clinton Rus-
sell, judiciary council; Bob Kemp,
43E, social chairman, and Ray Wise,
'41, athletic chairman.
Chicago House officers are Dave
Matthews, '41Ed, president; Earl Ar-
kiss, '42, vice-president; Lewis Saks,
'44, secretary; Bob Judson, '44, trea-
surer; Bruce Forbes, '42, judiciary
council; Paul Franklin, '43, social
chairman; Carl McNicholas, '44,
scholarship chairman, and Randall
Bostwick, '44, athletic chairman.
In Wenley House, Bill Van Gieson,
'43E, was chosen as president; Art
Geib, '44, vice-president; Jim Sum-
ner, '43, secretary-treasurer; Bob
Ehrler, '44, judiciary council; Phil
Heuber, '44, social chairman; Ted
Goslewiske, '44, athletic chairman,
and Jack Dorr, '44, scholarship
chairman.
Winchell House selected Doug Da-
vis, '44, president; Bud Brimmer, '44,
vice-president; Finley Moser, '43,
secretary; Fred Hoffman, '44, trea-
surer; Allen Axelrod, '43, judiciary
council; Jack Brackett, '44, social
chairman; George Jaquillard, '43,
athletic director, and John MacKin-
non, '44, scholarship chairman.
Final elections in Allen-Rumsey,
Lloyd, Michigan and Williams houses
will be held next Monday.

Shortage Of Machinists Causing
Bottleneck In Defense Program'

As the United States begins direct-
ing its economy towards the goal of
a strong national defense, bottlenecks
are beginning to appear that may
seriously hamper both the national
defense program and peace time pro-
duction.
Several reasons for the one of the
most serious bottlenecks-the short-
age of skilled machinists and tool and
die workers-were disclosed yester-
day in an interview with Melvin C.
Peirce, manager of the local office
of the Michigan Employment Serv-
ice.
''Practically all men who can meet
four general requirements can find
employment at the present time," he
declared. The four requirements he
listed were good physical condition,
possession of a birth certificate in
many cases, or naturalization papers,
and training.
The pressure for skilled machinists
or tool and die workers has not hit
Ann Arbor yet," Peirce explained,
"because there are not many skilled
workers normally employed here and
also there are not many factories en-
gaged directly in defense work."
He went on to point out, however,
that the demand for this type of
labor is quite great in the more in-
dlustriAiz7r d ~Cnii~n+n--,

real jam in the production of dies for
mass production requirements. It is
especially difficult to obtain new ma-
chinery to produce the articles needed
for national defense, it was disclosed.
The present lack of skilled tool
and die workers is the result of sev-
eral factors, Peirce explained. First,
during the last 10 years, the demand
for this work was not great and con-
sequently many workers went into
other lines and furthermore very few
new men learned the trade. Young
men preferred to make higher wages
on the production line rather than
sacrifice a few years at the low ap-
prentice pay that is necessary to learn
a highly skilled trade.
At the present time, it was pointed
out that when the demand for skilled
machinists and tool and die workers
has become pressing, there are not
only an insufficient number avail-
able now but also there seems to be
few recruits going into the trade. The
biggest reason for this, Peirce said,
is the competing attraction of higher
wages on the production side, which
attracts able-bodied men who think
only of the short-run situation, away

Capt. Davidson
Discusses Navy
ROTC U.S. Naval Expert
Opens Talk Series
Capt. Lyal A. Davidson, chairman
of the Naval ROTC department,
opened the 1940-41 series of naval
lectures yesterday with his talk en-
titled "The Navy: Its Past Develop-
ment and Present Purxoses."
Capt. Davidson traced the history
of the U.S. Navy from its early be-
ginnings in Revolutionary times to
the present. He emphasized technical
developments such as the exploding
shell, armor plate, steam, the screw
propeller, and finally the dread-
naught type of war vessel.
The maritime nation without a nav-
al policy is like a ship at sea without
a chart, said Captain Davidson, and
he noted the disarmament trend

Students View
Grid Chances
A gainst Penn,
<continued from Page 1)
she knew very, very little about foot-
ball or the coming game. She is cer-
tain, however, that it "is sure to be
a real thriller, even though I've never.
heard of Reagan and don't have time
to read the sports columns."
If the prediction made by Arthur
H. Bikoff, '41, is correct, the Wolver-
ine-Quaker battle should be as good
a game as the season can produce.
He said that "the game featuring
two of the country's outstanding
backs should be a thrilling spectacle.
However, the presence of Michigan's
sterling linemen and Blocker Eva-
shevski should turn the tide in Michi-
gan's favor. This game, for sheer
excitement and thrills, will head the
country's football parade."

Here Is
In

Today's
Summary

Ann Arbor

News

Fire of indeterminate origin caus-
ing an estimated $3,000 damage,
'aged through a three-storybuilding
in Manchester early yesterday and
threatened the entire southside busi-
ness district.
The building, owned by Russell
Widmayer, contained a beer tavern
on the ground floor, American Legion
clubrooms on the second and Boy
and Girl Scout quarters on the third.
Most ofathetdamage occurred on the
second and third floors.
Manchester firemen bad the blaze
under control within an hour of its
report, and Ann Arbor fire equip-
ment and thetJackson County chief's
car, sent to the township-, were not
needed.
Myron Gins, 41, 715 Hill St. re-

Unnin fill Present
Football New sreel
Of Illinois Game
All those sons and daughters of
Michigan who wish to re-live the
excitement and thrills of last Sat-
urday's Homecoming football game
with "Wily" Bob Zuppke's eleven
from Illinois have been invited to
attend the Michigan Union Football
Newsreel at 7:30 p.m. Sunday eve-
ning in the main ballroom of the
Union.
Matt Mann, Michigan's famous
swimming coach, took the movie
shots which will be shown under the
sponsorship of the Michigan Alumni
Association and the Union.
MONTH-END SALE
SMARTEST
HOSI ERY SHOPP'E

e areas where r here is a from apprenticeships.
F LASSIFIED ADVERTISING

which has always weakened our sea "The game is bound to be close,
forces after every major war. He both teams to score and Michigan
particularly disclaimed the policy of to win by 12 points," commented
coastal defense which was first in- Dick Mead, '43E. "Harmon and Rea-
augurated by Jefferson at the ex- gan are both so good that the lines
will decide the outcome of this thril-
pense of the American Navy. ler."
Captain Davidson detailed the dif- Again stressing the feminine view-
ferent types of vessels which have point, Helen Rigterink, '41, said that
served in our navy, from the wooden she probably would watch the crowd
frigates and sloops to today's armored as much as the actual play. "But,"
cruisers, destroyers, submarines and she added, "I'm looking forward to
other highly specialized types. He this game - it should be thrilling.
commented on the lack of congres- It'll be close, with each team making'
sional cooperation which has always a couple of touchdowns and Michi-
slowed progress in the navy, and thus gan winning by a narrow margin.
prevented America from maintaining Boy, and if we beat Penn, we'll beat
the lead in sea power. them all.

ported yesterday that hehad 2lost Michigan Theatre Bldg.
$43.00 between October 2 and 22. J
0x"""""yo<---->0e>o<"""">o<=->o<=o<--- ro - y=; o<-- omon< oc"
FAREWELL TOUR
YvALE P.UPPDETEERKS
IN A NEW ADULT SHOW Featuring
"My Man Friday"
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, October 25, 26 8:30 p.M.
All Seats Reserved-75c and 50c
Box office open October 23 Mail Orders Now Tel 6300 V
a4;;;;0 ;;;;> 4;;;;o o ;;;;y ;;;>

TYPING- 18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689. 9c
TYPING-Experience. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave., phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN - Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.

FOR SALE

UY

PERSONAL STATIONERY - 100
sheets, 100 envelopes, printed with
your name and address-$1.00.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard St. 12c
MISCELLANEOUS -20
WE ARE EAGER to help sororities
and fraternities with their mail-
ings and programs. Edwards Let-
ter Shop, 711 N. University. Phone
2-2846. 6c
LOST and FOUND
COST-Green alligator purse. Wed.
evening. Reward. Return to Uni-
versity Lost and Found. 82
LOST-Pair of pastel green long hair
Angora gloves Tuesday near Kres-
ge's. Reward. Call Miss Steinke,
2-1594. 83
LOST-Ladies' gold Hamilton wrist
watch. Initials F. A. on back. Call
Frances Aaronson, 2-3119. Reward.
84
TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 5c
LAUNDERING -9.
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. loc
Price List
(All articles washed and ironed)
SILVER LAUNDRY
607 Hoover Phone 5594
Free pickups and deliveries
Shirts.....................14
Undershirts ................ .04
Shorts.................... .04
Pajama Suits...............10
Socks, pair ...... ......03
Handkerchiefs.............. .02
Bath Towels...............03
All Work Guaranteed
Also special prices on Coeds'
laundries. All bundles done sep-
ar^ tely. No markings. Silks,
wools are our specialty.

TODAY

THE COMEDY THAT TOOK
NEW YORK BY STORM!

I

o CollE

lATE!

-down at dear old Pottawatomie University!

First Michigan Showing!

4I

The "Middle-Weight"

. ,°

Jack et Champion
Wholly new idea in indoor-outdoor coats. Originated
by Manhattan, and selected in a poll by upper class-
men: "We like it, weight, colors, saddle stitching and
all." Wool suede, $8.95. At your favorite store, along
with those other Manhattan hits, the wool-and-rayon
gabardine shirt ($5), and the plaid cotton flannel high-
tone Hillbilly shirt ($2).

t

;

The Manhattan Shirt Company, 444 Madison Ave., N. Y. C.

--

11

1i.

Maines25cI
Now! MICHIGAN Mn
Nights 040cI
Helpless Henry one minute... Hurricane Hank the
r next! And all because of one kiss! From timid soul to
holy terror... it's riotous romance!

I ncl.

I

F'CTV~iP.

I

t II e Col
eo o
fWa Never Menhe 1 '
Produced and ..' N ero mje '0"h ,, Cuse
directed by sIpI19a 0d Span oke
1A.0. F( R F AIR CnTT ~SP's eGO{

I. \NN1w/of=kl . .m,~k 1

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