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October 24, 1940 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Pennsylvarna

Tilt Shapes Up As Prospective Aerial Battle

'GRIDIRON
TIPS
(This is the first in a series of arti-
cles designed to give the reader any
insight into the finer points of foot-
ball and how to watch the game. The
first article deals with the line on
offense. )
Most of the success of any team
depends on the strength of its line.
On defense the line furnishes a brunt
of the attack. On direct line plays
these seven men will be found open-
ing up a hole to allow the ball carrier
and his interference to pass through.
Watch how the running guard pulls
out to precede the interference in
order to block out one of the line-
backers. See the men work together
while carrying out their blocking as-
signments and then go on to aid the
ball carrier with down field blocking.
Watch the center pull out and crack
down an unsuspecting tackle. Watch
the ends dash into the open field and
try to out-maneuver the opposing
backs so that they can receive a pass.
Follow the end as he pulls around
to receive the ball on the deceptive
end-around play.
Find the ends and tackles on a
punt as they race to down the re-
ceiver while the guards and center
protect the punter at the center of
the line.
Yes, take your eyes off the ball and
see who really makes most of the
touchdowns.
Kappa Sigma Triumphs
Over Chi Phi Team, 11-10
In the feature of the two-game fra-
ternityspeedball card at Ferry Field
yesterday Kappa Sigma nosed out
Chi Phi, 11-10. Kappa Sigma had to
stave off a late Chi Phi bid to win.
Fred Tyler was the pacemaker for
the winners with five points, while
Bob Antle counted four points for
the losers.
The other contest saw Phi Delta
Theta take the decision in a low score
game, 1-0, over Sigma Alpha Mu.
The only score of the tilt came
in the second period, when Jack Mey-
er made good on a penalty kick.

Smashing Soh. Displays Versatility

Strong Lines
May Struggle
To Standstill
Harmon, Reagan Can Toss
Passes As Well As Run;
Kelto, Anderson Injured
Midwestern football followers are
looking forward with interest to the
prospect of an aerial battle at the
Michigan Stadium next Saturday.
And a very likely possibility it is too.
Press advances on the game have
been toying with the prospect of one
of the great ball-carrying duels of,
the year but*there is a very definite
possibility that both teams may have
to take to the air in an attempt to
score.
While it is true that Michigan and
Pennsylvania boast two of the finest
running backs in the country in Tom
Harmon and Francis Reagan, it is
also true that these lads are not
averse to heaving the apple now and
then. Another fact that is perhaps
less well known to the fans is that
this game will bring together two
of the most powerful lines in the
country. Should these two strong
forward walls play each other to a
standstill, the double aerial attack
will become more than a possibility.
Crisler vetoed the idea of scrim-
mages emphatically during yester-
day's . practice session. "We can't
afford the possibility of injuries."
"They were sharp for the Illinois
game," he said, "but we'll just have
to take a chance that their blocking
and tackling will be right for Penn
without a real scrimmage.''
The only disheartening feature of
the day's workout was a slight shoul-
der bruise suffered by Reuben Kelto,
Varsity right tackle, due to a faulty
pad. This is not expectedsto hinder
him in Saturday's contest. Harry
Anderson, reserve guard, also added
his name to the injured list, coming
down with a bad ankle injury.
SOPHOMORES
All second-year men eligible
for basketball manager tryouts
report to the I-M Building at
7:30 p. m. today.
Bill Osborn, Manager

Aiming.For Quakers

don wirtehafter's
SDAIL YDOUBLE

One of Michigan's sophomore stars, who promises to develop into a
football great is Harold "Tippy" Lockard, from Canton, Ohio. A hard
plunging back and a bulwark on defense, he was recently shifted to the
right halfback position, where he should fit well into Coach Crisler's
weak side plays. Lockard's ability to play either fullback or halfback
greatly adds to the Michigan backfield reserve strength.
Chambers, Dreher Demonstrate
Fencing Technique To Classes

Bob Westfall, Michigan's power-
house fullback, who played such an
important part in the 28-0 victory
over Illinois last Saturday, will be
a threat in the undefeated Wolver-
ine's ground game against the in-
vading Pennsylvania team this
Saturday.
Phi Gamma Delta, Dekes
Win Volleyball Openers
Phi Gamma Delta and Delta Kappa
Epsilon copped all the honors last
night, with the Phi Gams looking es-
pecially impressive, as the generalj
fraternity volleyball loop started the
season's fight for the title won last
year by Sigma Nu.
The Phi Gams won both their
games, beating Alpha Delta Phi, 15-7,
15-17, 15-9, and shutting out Sigma
Phi, 15-7, 15-13. The Dekes also took
both games, winning over Sigma Phi,
15-8, 15-10, and defeating the Alpha
Delts 15-5, and 15-9.

Which Verse Is Worse? ...
A Wolverine student, Sam Russell
by name, received this bit of Longfel-
low in the mails this week from a
friend in the City of Brotherly Love:
There once was a halfback named
Harmon,
Whose write-ups were oh, so
alarmin'
But when walked on by Penn
He was heard to say then
"I should ought to have taken up
farmnin.'"
In retaliation, the Daily Double
produces the following today:
There once was a halfback named
Reagan
Whose write-ups were oh, so mis-
leadin'
But when walked on by Mich
He was heard to say "oh tish,
I should ought to have taken up,
gosh, almost anything."
Penn's trip here will be the only
time George Munger's squad leaves
Franklin Field all year. Celebrating
the bi-centennial anniversary of the
University, the Quakers have a seven-
game home card. Navy, Harvard, Ar-
my, and Cornell will all travel to Phil-
adelphia to aid in the festivities.
I enjoyed Henry McLemore's
suggestions concerning Satur-
day's game. He believes that the
other 10 men from each team will
want seats on the 50 to see the
highly publicized Harman-Rea-
gan duel... That hot lick on the
trumpet followed by the "fight"
cheer was brought back from
Harvard by the band. . . The
Crimson:, in turn, copied the bit
from the University of New
Hampshire band, who in turn,
etc...
Remember the clock troubles they
had in last year's Michigan-Penn
game? With seconds left, Penn re-
covered its own short on-side kick-
off . . .The Wolverines, however,
started to argue about the situation
and while this went on, so did the
electric clock at the end of the
field ...Before the thing was settled
the clock struck finish and off went
the gun.. .Penn was furious.. .The
refs could do nothing ... The rules,
they said, did not allow them to
turn back the hands of the clock.
Penn has allowed its opponents
but 26 yards and four first

downs through rushingthis
campaign . . .The Quakers are
minus only one man from last
year's outfit . . .end Harland
Gustafson . . .but ample re-
placements have been found .. .
Reagan's dad saw his son
against college competition for
the first time last Saturday in
the Princeton game . . .Encour-
aged by the 31 points kid Frank
tallied, the old man R. intends to
come to Ann Arbor for the Mich-
igan scrap.. .he stayed away from
football games for four years af-
ter he saw Frankie break a leg
in a high school battle . . . He's
a foreman.
Michaels-Stern

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Makes from
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Jayson Shirts
Wembley Ties
Holeproof Hose
Bradley
Sweaters
Gordon
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SUITS
Tailored in Rochester.
truly the finest val-
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By DICK SIMON
"On Guard! Advance! Lunge! Re-1
tire!" Those are the words used by
Ray Chambers and Johnny Dreher
as they put their fencing class
through their exercises at the Sports
Building three times a week.
This hard working group of 30
men, some from the Scimitar Club
and some just fencing enthusiasts,
work out two hours each meeting to
improve their fencing knowledge and
to acquaint themselves better with
the different types of weapons used
in this sport.
It is the firm belief of both Cham-
bers and Dreher, the former having
three years experience and the lat-
ter two years, that fencing can best
be improved by practice, and to put
this to test one hour each meeting
is devoted to reviewing old material
and acquiring new and the last hour
is spent in practicing.
The squad works out with three
different weapons, starting with the
foil. The beginners work out for
the first semester with this weapon
only and gradually work up to the
others. Ladder tournaments and
meets are held for both the experi-
enced andinexperienced men, while
the Scimitar Club members usually
hold an annual match among them-
selves. Usually the group sponsors
an All-Campus fencing tournament
M' CLUB MEETNG
There will be an 'M Club meet-
ing at 8 p. m. today at the Un-
ion.
Bill Combs, President
Complete Showing of
SWVVEATERS
and
JACKETS
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Everything in the sweater
and jacket family is here.
See them today.
Sweaters 2.00 - 6.50
Jackets 3.95 - 17.50
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in which any person attending the
University is permitted to enter.
On this year's squad there are only
a few experienced men. Jim Straw-
bridge, Melvin Campbell, George
Bosch, Jack Moser, Henry Barringer,
and Larry Breitenbach are all back
and eager to broaden their knowledge
of fencing.

Gridiron Scouts Are Responsible
For Much Of Wolverines'Success

TOPCOATS
B the Fihest Makers
50 to
j3Ipt Jrtt
DISTINCTIVE AM.NS WSA
116 EAST LIBERTY

By HARRY ANDERSON
The success of Michigan's maraud-
ing football forces this year has been
laid to various people: Tom Har-
mon, Bob Westfall, Capt. Evashevski,
and Fritz Crisler. Now, all these
men have had their fingers in the
victory pie, that is true, but let us
now pay homage to those forgotten
men of the gridiron world, who make
no headlines, who receive no glory-
the football scouts.
These boys spend their big game
Saturdays in our opponents' stadi-
ums. With a pair of high powered
field glasses glued to their optics and
a feverishly working pencil in hand
they proceed to diagram such things
as our future opponents' defensive
and offensive formations and the
weaknesses and strong points of each.
They also make a minute study of
our enemies' personnel, taking note

of ages, weights, heights, home towns,
and, of course, abilities. On the
train en route to Ann Arbor they as-

of reconnaisance men in the country.
Wally Weber, "the eternal Fresh-
man," has scouted Illinois for nigh
these eleven years. His reporting of
the ever changing plans of Bob Zupp-
ke is a tough job well-handled.
Bennie Oosterbaan, possessing one
of the best football heads of them
all, has been "smelling out" both
Minnesota and Ohio State for almost
a decade.
Ernie McCoy made his debut in the
scouting racket with a capable job
on Harvard. The Crimson's loop-
ing line tactics were easily solved by
Michigan's line as it followed Ernie's
instructions. Result: victory for the
Maize and Blue.
At the present time wrestling coach
Cliff Keen is letting the squad in on
Pennsylvania's stuff, having scouted
the Quakers in their lop-sided vic-
tories over Yale and Princeton. Cliff
brings news that Penn has ten of the
starting regulars back from last year,
and that Francis Xavier Reagan is
still the hip-swiveling, bullet-pass-
ing phenom that gave the Wolver-
inesmay an anxious moment last
autumn.
Hereafter, football fans, when
handing out victory bouquets, please
do not forget the unsung heroes, the
football scouts.

"T'ops for fall"
That's what campus men are saying
about our new knee length topcoat
with contrasting railroad stitching
on cuffs and bottom. It has roomy
slash-through pockets, deep yoke
and sleeve lining of lustrous rayon.
A smartly tailored mixture of wool
and camels hair in natural and teal
blue, it is priced at only .. .
$22 50
"Compare our Prices"

N

sere s Hat
Stele for You!

WALLY WEBER
similate all their materials and pre-
sent them Monday morning to Head
Coach Crisler, who acts according-
ly in planning his next week's stra-
tegy.
Michigan has one of the best groups

fEfZTOG GERY
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Greene Building

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The little lady isn't twinkling so intrig-
uingly at our robust hero without a
reason ... And after considerable study
we must admit that it isn't the man so
much as the rugged he-man roughness
of the Stein Bloch "Casual" he's wear-
ing that seems to be tickling her fancy
...Why not drop around and see what
one of these swell suits can do for you?

6

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about the hat you're going to
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