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October 20, 1940 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-20

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TUHElMICHM~fAN 1DAILY

rAGE FIVE

- i as a a i t. is i V' ' 11 L 1'1 1 a.! 1

r Maur. r a r e

6 ,

Conscription
And Campaign

THE

WEEK

TN

REVIEW

Whither Greece
And Turkey?

.......

'I

AT,
17,000,000
Sign Up
Most publicized step in what
cynical observers were terming
only lottery in the world wher(
body wins took place last week
an estimated 17,000,000 young
aged 21 to 36, stood in long
throughout the nation to regist
the first peacetime draft in hi
Reaction among the registrant:
pended for the most part, on wh
they were poor men, rich men,
gar men or thieves. But on one
all observers were satisfied: there
no outright rebellion. The New,
Times, recalling the anti-draft
of 1917, wrote what seemed al
a muted sigh of relief, the hea
-Youth Is Enrolled Withou
Hitch. Early reports indicated tl
had been found necessary to
diet less than a score for willful
ligence in the matter of registry
People were willing to agree wit]
Clarence Dykstra, National Di:
of the Selective Military Service,
"registration went off happily,
enthusiasticallyj..."
Preparations Start
What would happen later, no
could say. While Federal Grand
ies began hearings on objet
cases, 6,500 draft boards in the
prepared for the most ard
part of the task. In Washirn
War-Secretary Stimson gave
to the rumour that, because of
sufficient housing facilities, only
000 men would be called by next
His figures: 30,000 on Novembe:
60,000 on December 2, 60,000 on
uary 3, 90,000 on January
160,000 on February 10, 200,0C
March 5, 200,000 on June 15, ma
a total of 800,000.
National Unrest
Meanwhile, on other nat
fronts, these things were happen
Mexican sources reported thal
all probability"the U. S. and ME
will negotiate a mutual defensea
ment similar to the U.S.-Canada
cord about Jan. 1
Ten other South and Latin Ar
can neighbors sent army officia:
the U. S. upon invitation of Chi
Staff George C. Marshall to
national defense centers.
The President authorized a su
of critical war materials, particu
machine tools, which have been

HOME

dered by, but not delivered to foreign
powers, with a view to requistionaing
those materials considered essential
to U. S. defense.
Jesse Jones, Federal Loan Adminis-
trator and Secretary of Commerce
revealed that negotiations were be-
ing carried on with the Bank of
China on the subject of further
essential defense products needed by
the U. S.
FDR Enters'
Election Fray
For weeks Mr. Roosevelt has been
twitted in cartoon and column for
his "non-political" activities without
changing his statements on how close
to Washington those activities kept
him. Last week, he was reay to re-
move the tongue from cheek long
enough to reveal a planned itiper-
ary for five pre-election speeches of a
definitely political nature. Between
Oct. 23 and election eve, the President
will give speeches at Convention Hall
in Philadelphia, at Madison Square
Garden in New York, at Constitution
Hall in Washington and at the Public
Auditorium in Cleveland. Those four
speeches-all to get national airing-
and .a radio speech in the crucial
East, Democrats felt sure would drive
the final nails into the Willkie po-
litical coffin and secure the election
of Mr. Roosevelt by over-whelming
odds.
Roosevelt Confidence
Most political circles felt that
Roosevelt might just as well remain in
the White House, save his voice: Will-
kie could never catch up now. True,
the most recent Gallup poll show a
one per cent shift in the popular
vote, an 85 electoral vote gain by
Willkie since the Oct. 6 poll (Illinois,
Wisconsin, Iowa, Michigan and In-
diana shifted from FDR), but the
electoral margin was still 297 (414 to
117) in the President's favor. Time's
survey gave Roosevelt 309, Willkie,
54. Doubtful: 168.
Gallup's-Warning
But, despite the apparently over-
whelming Roosevelt margin, Demo-
cratic Party heads were willing to
make use of Dr. Gallup's warning:
"Willkie's gains in the current poll
demonstrate how a shift of but a few
percentage points (in the popular
vote) can throw °a large number of
electoral votes to one candidate or
the other." To insure that he will be
the catcher, Mr. Roosevelt is going
stumping.
If Mr. Willkie had seen the figures,
he did not show it. Instead, he reveal-
ed plans for 55 mere speeches in New
York, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Illi-
nois before Oct. 28, bringing his total
up to 200 since Rushville, Ind. That
he was qualified physically to make
them he indicated by his loud blasts
at the New Deal. He accused it of
"kidnapping" the real Democratic
party; of being responsible for the
present "slavery of idleness"; of in-
jecting politics into relief.

On the Road from Mandalay, Bound for China 'Cross the Bay
0 50 100 .'~-
MILES j'
RAILROADS *t4$4"10HSIAKWAN
SMYITKYINA i^
YUNGPING An 4
r < rb'"PAOSHAN ANN,~ d
TSHOUHIUNG KUM G
*MANGSHIN .LNGLING
aH C~ HEFENG C
7
GWAN ING1
L SH l VLL* T
CH I N A NANK
BUR MA R OA D - --*
'; ,1 .l~tAy !+ , /. rt . - p,6tf HVNGKING
KB UN R Ae-'1 Q ROoo
- .- UMNG KON
MANDALAY 4!.
enma"gawanHILI NE I
The map shows the vital Burma supply line over which China hopes to gain access again to world mar-
kets. The inset map shows how close to Japanese-controlled territory (black areas) the road passes.
Russian And German Troops In Rumania

FOREIGN

Out-BlIuffed
BBuffers?...
Bolstered by her new blood treaty
with Europe's bad boys, Japan's first
move was an official nose-thumbing
at long-resented, but feared, Anglo-
American interests in the Far East.
War-weary Britain and Europe-con-
scious U.S. took note, counted their,
chips and slapped back. From Eng-
land came the word that the appeas-
ingly-closed Burma road was to re-
open; in Washington, F.D.R. con-
sulted with Far Eastern experts,
clamped a ban on oil, iron shipments
to Nippon. Tokio was hot to take up
the challenge, and scare mongers
drew vivid pictures of Pacific war-
fare, pointed ominously to Burma
Road's opening date as the starting
signal.
Opening night in Burma. however,
saw a meeker, more cautious Japan.
She too had taken time to count her
chips, realized that the Oriental bluff
had been called. But slightly daunt-
ed by the U.S.-British fleets, Tokio
saw dollars and vital resources as
her foes' ace-in-the-hole.
With the calming of "banzai's"
over the Aixs Tri-Pact, she realized
too well that Nippon had been dealt
the short end of the diplomatic shuf-
fle. Her European partners were too
tangled in the British aerial offensive
and the Balkan web to seriously de-
tract U.S. attention from Asia. Bro-
ther Stalin too, was displeased, and
loomed ever larger on the northern
horizon.
Nearer home, Nipponese leaders
realized only too well that the Chinese
stalemate had already bled her re-
sources, tangled her communications,
sapped her morale. Her army was

still stalemated in the Chinese Bog;
rising spurts of Nationalist patriot-
ism caused no little worry. Advised
to leave the Far Eastern danger zone
were some 15,000 U.S. nationals: a
State Department gesture that Tokio
did not overlook.
By week's end, the Burmanese gates
were thrown wide. Headed Chiang
Kai-shek-ward was what experts
labeled the "greatest motorized cara-
van of history." Dodging down the
narrow, treacherous road went up-
wards of 500 U.S.-made trucks, piled
high with supplies and munitions for
the Chungking government. Waiting
in Rangoon Harbor were four Ameri-
can ships eager to disgorge to sub-
sequent fleets of trucks, estimated as
numbering more than 1,500.
Nazi Invasion
Thrust Foiled
Traditionally tardy official London
last week announced that a major
German invasion attempt had been
abruptly halted Sept. 16 when intense
R.A.F. bombardments broke the back
of the Nazi springboard. Coinci-
dently (?) Hitler and Mussolini met
eight days later in Brennero to talk
strategy.
Whether British airmen nipped a
major attempt or whether the Min-
istry cooked the yarn to cheer bomb-
weary Londoners is conjectural. As
the "tight little island" continued
to stave-off sporadic luftwaffe ex-
cursions, composed chiefly of light
bombers, R.A.F. reports of action over
continental Europe gave cockneys
and White Hall the sweet taste of
revenge. Hard hit were vital Ger-
man industrial and rail centers.

Seen

Sig nificant Of Impending Action

By Kirke L. Simpson
(Associated Press Staff Writer)
German and Russian army troops
face each other in the Danube Delta
in RumaI:ia under conditions that
could strike a war spark in the Bal-
kans at any moment. Anything can
happen there, and well may, despite
any Berlin and Moscow policy mak-
ing.
The Nazi and Red armies are tra-
ditional foes. The dubious Hitler-
Stalinfriendshipwas based on pure
expediency. No still existent mutual
interest suports it. It does not rest,
as does the Berlin-Rome Axis, on
the same have-not economy yearn-
ings and the will to satisfy them by
force.
Russia is not a have-not nation.
She has greater resources in man-
power and raw material than any
nation but China. What she lacks
is warmwater ports for year-round
commerce with the world. 4
That is precisely what she has not
achieved by siding with Germany for
thirteen months. Her costly victory

over Finland, swallowing of a trio of
little Baltic neighbors, sharing in
Polish partition spoils and wresting
of Bessarablia back from Rumania
western and near-eastern trade out-
lets.
Had Russia anticipated German
seizure of the Baltic-North sea gate-
way by invasion of Denmark and
Norway as a Nazi war move, the Rus-
so-Nazi non-aggression pact which
touched off the war probably would
never have been sealed. It eased "two-
front" war perils for Hitler. He is
now risking in Rumania exactly that.
but with a conquered continental
Europe, little able to exert counter
pressure, behind him
And Hitler and Mussolini are
threatening Russia with a Black Sea
duplication of her Baltic plight. She
may find herself bottled on both Eur-
opean sea flanks if the Axis push
eastward goes through.
Russia also has Hitler's word for
it that the still expanding greater
Reich looks longingly on Russian as

well as Egyptian economic flesh pots
-the breadbasket in the Ukraine for
example, or oil from the Caspian
field. Nazi economic exploitation of
Russia to augment income from Ger-
man industry and technical skill is
on the cards, and the Red Army
knows it.
And the Red Army in the west is
as steeped in the doctrine that Ger-
many is Russia's arch foe as is the
Army in Siberia in the thesis that it
was created to deal with Japan.
Army hotheads on either side in
Rumania could precipitate incidents
which all the political agility of Hit-
ler and Stalin could not still.
When Russian forces entered Po-
land in Sept., 1939, neutral onlookers
inquired of the first Red Army tank
commander they encountered who the
Russians had come to fight.
"The Germans," was his reply.
He was wrong then. He might
not be wrong now about the situation
in Rumania. Certainly, he spoke for
the Red Army thought, if not for
Moscow policy, a year ago.

* ,o <_>o o<y o c >o<:--yo<=-o --yo< -- -<=oc c .q
H TOASTl"...
To ASuccessful Party
Here's to a party that's
sure to be a success when
your guests see our beauti- E t
fulcocktail napkins and ' s \
party tableclothes.
"Always Reasonably Priced"
G0 AGE LIINEN SHOP
10 NICKELS ARCADE
t <=o=;o=> "<=onomoo ;o o 80)

.11

Correction
THE CHIME BOWLS spoken
of in Saturday's ad are made
of Chinese brass. When struck
they produce beautiful tones.
Handy for dinner gongs.
Oriental
Gift Shop_
320 South State

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Axis Begins

H UTZEL'S-
ANN A RBOR

ARTICLES FOR SALE
PERSONAL STATIONERY - 100
sheets, 100 envelopes, printed with
your name and address-$1.00.
Craft Press, 305 Maynard St. 12c
MISCELLANEOUS --20
RIDING HORSE to let until-June 15
for his board. For one or two riders.
Phone 7265. 74
TYPING- 18
TYPING-L. M. Heywood, 414 May-
nard St., phone 5689. 9c
VIOLA STEIN- Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
LAUNDERING -9

I!

Price List
(All articles washed and ironed)
SILVER LAUNDRY
607 Hoover Phone 5594
Free pickups and deliveries
Shirts ..................... .14
ndershirts ................ .04
Shorts.....................04
Pajama Suits...............10
Socks, pair ................. .03
Handkerchiefs..............02
Bath Towels ...............0.3
All Work Guaranteed
Also special prices on Coeds'
laundries. All bundles done sep-
arctely. No markings. Silks,
wools are our specialty.

..
" 4
,x" '. .
' ;>: .

LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c
TRANSPORTATION -21-
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 5c

Nazi diplomatic and "protective"
energies were loosed on the Balkans
again last week, as Der Fuehrer
marched eastward, followed by the
volatile Duce. Stakes in the game
were Anglo-friendly Greece and Tur-
key, undecisive Yugoslavia.
First to weaken was Yugoslavia.
Announced by Belgrad late yesterday
was a ne~w trade treaty with Hitler's
emissary. Said Foreign Minister
Alksander Cincar-Markovic: "Our
collaboration is not only economic,
but political."
Rumored at week's end were five
all-inclusive demands sent to Greece
by the Axis Boys. The demands called
for territorial concessions to Italy
and Bulgaria, the opening of bases
for Axis use, and reorganization of
the government to fit the Axis pat-
tern and the severance of economic
relations with Britain.
Nazi officials were quick to deny
the "squeeze," but added: "But no-
body who remains aloof from throw-
ing in his cause with the axis need
be surprised if he finds, afterwards,
that he has missed the boat."
In Istanbul, Turkish newspaper
Yeni Sabah tried to muster a united
Balkan front.

Squeeze

Play

;
:
:
s w
:
.

In Balkans

PROM

STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special
dent rates. Moe Laundry,
South First St. Phone 3916.

TROTTER
You'RE SURE to make a sweet im-
pression at that very important
event . . . if you're wearing a
Mimi gown. Choose from our Vel-
vets, crepes, chiffons, nets . .
fashion perfect in every detail.
Also of wardrobe importance are
our Formal Skirts and Blouses.

stu-
226
14c

.
f
i ' it'.; 'F:;
:";"lf,
.r r
.. u F>:
"
h f
.:{ is y
r {i! ;!
."1 x '. " ,
r.: .. }':..: ry
. i:
. .

At Prices
to lit Your Budget.

ii

.f

DESIGN FOR

BASIC BEAUTY

Ago&-

('

'01

r1

FALL STOCKING COLOR
A warm beige, to wear with your mink coat, your
alligator shoes, or to complement a moss-green
wool frock. It comes in your favorite daytime and
dress styles of Nolde & Horst sheer stockings, and
you'll love the subtle way it blends into the line of
the long-ond-narrow silhouette. P.S.-It's grand
with daytime black.

1
AR"ENA
CREAM . : .
A FRR - i :
FP A(RfA+1 AYWA
I. w;m mm - 'SKIN LOTIO'
A4DEtiN
sane n AexI CLEANSING
CREAM ?;:::
{ fwtIVQEN A?,
ESSENTIALS by

rr

345 MAYNARD STREET

DORIOTHY THOMPSON

,

I

Keen Analyst of World Affairs
FOURTH NUMBER-NOVEMBER 19.
1940-41 LECTURE COURSE
Only a Limited Time Remains to Purchase Season Tickets!
Eight Stellar Attractions

Your complexion needs Elizabeth Arden care every
day of your life! Cleanse with Ardena Cleansing Cream
($1 to $6) always in combination with Ardena Skin
Lotion ($1 to $15). Tone with Ardena Skin Lotion. Soothe
with Ardena Velva Cream ($1 to$6)...or Ardena Orange
Skin Cream ($1 to $8) And for nmirk in4' Pn

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