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October 17, 1940 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-17

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1940 ,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TEMBN

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1940 PAGE THREE

Varsity

Works

Intensively

In

Preparation

For

Illinois

Yearlings old Long
Kuzma, Pregelman
Blocking and tackling practice, an J job on
intensive passing drill, and a large tempt t
dose of scrimmage was the order of he back
the day for the fresman grid aspir- bringing
ants under Coach Wally Weber yes- and Clif
terday. Anot
One team of yearlings, who had was unc
been taught the tricky offense of after be
Wily Bob Zuppke's Illini, scrimmaged took up
the varsity s6 that the latter might Don Bc
have a good idea of what to expect Schoolv
this Saturday. ent Wo
The remainder of the squad, after both sp
a lengthy drill in fundamentals, ed the
separated into teams, and battled for size
through a hard-fought scrimmage. One
Tom Kuzma, big fullback from Gary, Green,1
Ind., continually ripped off long was beir
gains to share the spotlight with cen- back, bi
ter Merv Pregelman and guard Juli- right h
us Franks. for som
Pregelman and Franks both blocked
with devastating accuracywhilebJohn Car
Gilpin, a boy who has never before
played football, showed up excep- Howa;
tionally well on defense. Big Pregel- and the

S crimmage;
t, Franks Star
their hands when they at-
o ride him out of the play as
ed up the line in fine fashion,
g smiles to the faces of Weber
If Keene, line coach.
her potential varsity fullback
covered in Austin Miller who,
eing inserted into the lineup,

Fraternity Track
Meet To Be Held
At Ferry Field

don wirtchafter s
DAIL Y
'DOUBLE

I ' 1 U 1 7l.l uatt
Runs Through
Illinois' Plays
Complete Practice Session
s Devoted To Defense;

Rugged Bob Kolesar Has Seen
Eight Years Of Grid Experience

Forty-One
Annual
Psi U

Houses
Event
Defends

Enter
Today;
Title

li

By HAL WILSON!
Eight years of organized football.
That's the record of rugged Bob
Kolesar, 195-pound bundle of grid-
iron dynamite, who in his first year

where Kuzma had left off. By ART HILL
oor, fresh from Kiski Prep There'll be plenty of chuckles at
where so many past and pres- Ferry Field this afternoon at 4:15.
lverine stars have developed, For today is the big day when every
it Derby, fleet halfback, were embryo Wykoff and Paddock who is
eedy and elusive as they skirt- a member of a Michigan fraternity

ends and slashed off tackle
,able advances.
casualty was reported. Bob
190 pound Kiski graduate who
ng used as first team quarter-
roke the small bones in his
and and will be out of action
e time.
ey Wins Golf Title

will have a chance to find his place
in the sun. Today is the date of the
annual interfraternity outdoor track
meet.
No less an authority than Varsity
track coach Ken Doherty has said
that this event is "just about the
most interesting feature of the in-
tramural season, from a spectator
Istandpoint." Students who take a

i

couple of hours off this afternoon
rd Carey's 84 took the medal to come down and watch the festivi-
campus golf title as he bested ties are assured of an amusing spec-
field in the Annual Fall All- tacle.
m .. _

man also served notice that opposing
teams are going to have a man-sized

a largef

Campus Tournament.

I.

AMERI CA'S

FINEST

FINGERTIP COATS
and MACKINAWS,
FOR THE OUTOORS

Almost complete
showing of the

je

famous Shanhouse
Coats and Jackets-
in all the new
Autumn shades -
Zipper and button
imodels.
Colors: Tan, blue,
maroon, teal, green,
brown.
r-
FINGERTIPS
$10.95
Others 3.95 up
FINGERTIP REVERSIBLES . . . . . . $10.95
COVERT SLACKS . . . . . . . . $5.50
RUGBY SWEATERS - All Styles . . $2.00 to $6.50
CloTRIERS
RABI DEAUOTIWSHRR S
119 SOUTH MAIN STRaEET

Meet Is Orthodox
Notwithstanding all reports to the
contrary, this meet still retains many
of the features of an orthodox track
meet. The 100-yard dash, the high
jump, the broad jump, the shot put,
the pole vault and the discus throw
are events which anyone would ex-
pect to encounter at a track meet.
All of these events will be encoun-
tered at this particular track meet.
But there are others.
One of the unique features of this
meet is a little number known as the
potato race. Investigation has dis-
closed that in spite of the name,
potatoes play no part whatsoever in
the running of this event. In fact, it
is rumored that this event was once
known as the tomato race, but due to
the fact that many of the older East-
ern fraternities insisted on pronoun-
cing "tomato" with a broad "a," caus-
ing considerable dissension, the name
was changed. The Intramural De-
partment now employs wooden blocks
in this event.
Has Unusual Touches
Other unusual touches are the
shuttle relay, the progressive broad
jump and the leap-frog relay. An
additional event is the baseball throw.
The defending campus champion
is Psi Upsilon. However, they will
not be prohibitive favorites today
since it is rumored that their pota-
to race team is badly riddled by grad-
uation.
House Speedball~
Hits New High

p.s
- ----1earnDisplays Spirit
On the week before the Illinois
game last year. the Michigan Daily's A pepped-up band of football play-
sports editor published a plan of at- ers got a preview of what Bob Zuppke
tack against the men of Zuppke. and his Illinois team will bring to
Confident that the Wolverines Ann Arbor Saturday as a red- shirted
could not lose, my predecessor de- freshman team ran through the
scribed a method by which Tom famed Zuppke offense of trick pass
Harmon could outshine the amazing plays and multiple ball-handling,
gridiron performance of a certain Wally Weber's yearlings filled the
galloping Illini halfback on the same air with flying pigskins and com-j
turf 15 yers before. pleted double laterals, spinners, and
His plan worked out beautifully. reverses in addition to acquainting
Michigan lost, the varsity with an unusual shift at
Therefore, I too am presenting a the line of scrimmage.
plan today. I also have prepared a That Old Fox
list of "must-do's." My only hope But it was all in preparation for
is that I don't enjoy the success of Bthwasxand in prewrftIn-
my predecessor. Here is the list dians from Champaign. "Illinois has
1. Any Michigan student who gained two-thirds of their ground
whispers the word "Red" this week I this year through the air, Coach Cris-
must be sent back to Russia. ler revealed, and they've used nine
2. The honest rural American passers and about 13 different re-
word "grange" must be struck from ceivers to do it with."
all Michigan books, and simple So most of the afternoon's practice
synonyms like farm, granary, or session was devoted to defensive
country house must be substituted. work against these Illinois plays. The
3. Two years at Alcatraz will be team showed plenty of spirit and fight
in store for any Wolverine who during the workout and Crisler re-
mentions the terms "galloping" and marked that "It shouldn't be hard
"ghost" in the same sentence. to get them mentally set for this
4. Anyone in the University re- game."
ceiving a 77 on a bluebook this "But Illinois is going to be pretty
week will automatically fail the tough," the Michigan coach pointed
course. One of Illinois' favorite sons out. "They're bigger and heavier than
an auburn-haired lad whose name last year and Wally (Weber) said
I cannot mention under penalty of they might have beaten Southern
the law, used to gallop around the California if Ehni hadn't sliced a
gridirons with that number on his four yard punt."
back. Line Has Drill
5. Anyone singing "Home on the With these thoughts in mind, the
Range" will be taken to Eloise for line was sent through a blocking
60 days. While the song itself ex- drill while Rudy Sengel and Bill Mel-
presses a delightful bit of senti- zow practiced place-kicks under the
ment, those standing far away watchful eye of Crisler.
might not hear it clearly. They Only Joe Rogers remained on the
might believe you are singing about sidelines yesterday, but he said his
a certain Illinois star. bruised shoulder should be well
6. The letters R-E-D-G-R-A-N- enough to allow him to start the
G-E will be broken off of every game. The rest of the squad is in
Michigan Daily typewriter. excellent physical condition and
There is my plan of attack. rapidly approaching the proper men-
* * * tal pitch for the Zuppkemen.

.

BOB KOLESAR
on Fritz Crisler's varsity squad, is
hot on veteran Milo Sukup's heels
in a torrid fight for the regular guard
berth on the Wolverine football ma-
chine.
Packing his weight on a five foot,
ten inch frame, the hard-hitting
sophomore from Cleveland, Ohio, has
all the requisites necessary for a
championship performer. He has
speed, not only in the straightaway,
but also in quickness of movement,
which is invaluable on the gridiron.
Back in 1932, the pre-New Deal
days, Bob first started on his long
gridiron career, playing with a ban-
tam-weight outfit, the Cleveland News
Skippies. Although most of the grid-
ders were 17 and 18 years old, Bob
was only 12 and just beginning to
pay adult prices at the movies.
The following year Bob's weight
had increased from 105 to 128, which
was seven pounds above the bantam-
weight limit. There was just one
thing to do-so the pile-driving guard
became a martyr to the Skippies'
cause, sitting in the steam bath every
Friday night. But it was worth it,
for his team trounced an Akron out-
fit before 20,000 spectators to cop

the National Bantamweight cham-
pionship.
In his senior year at John Adams
high school in 1937 Bob climaxed
three years of varsity play by win-
ning All-State grid honors and lead-
ing his team to the city title before
a 50.000 crowd in Cleveland's Muni-
cipl' Stadiium.
Despite this football-filled. exist-
ence. however, this bone-crunching
blocker has yet to attain his great-
est ambition- -help beat Notre Dame,
his high school coach's alma mater,
when the Wolverines play the Irish
in 1942, Bob's senior year.
But you can bet Bob will play plen-
ty of football before that distant date.
It's Topcoat Tme
We are show-
ing a vast se-
lection in Camel
Hair, Fleece,
Tweed, and Co-
$22.50
to
{ 35.
SUITS
By Michaels Stern
ad other fine mak-
ers, all the newest.
$22.50
' to
d $40
Al so a fine selec-
tion of Furnishings
by nationally known
maker.s hop here
before you buy.
01STINCT1V mLNAT I rA
116 EAST LIBERTY

AddIft

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:Peg PA1014- 1 " omm qo mloW *001-M-04-14-0 Wowm-fthq-, - I -

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Scoring what proved to be the
final marker in the closing seconds
of play, Phi Kappa Psi eked out a
close 8 to 7 victory over Chi Psi yes-
terday at South Ferry Field to high-
light the day's interfraternity speed-
ball games. Sigma Chi defeated The-
ta Delta Chi, 16 to 5, in a marathon3
game with Cory and Reuter leading
the way for Sigma Chi with five
points each.
In other games played yesterday,
Lambda Chi Alpha defeated Phi
Gamma Delta, 4 to 2; Beta Theta
Pi's speedball machine rolled over
Phi Sigma Delta, 11 to 4; Kappa Sig-
ma defeated Pi Lambda Phi, 9 to 4.{
THOUT
ldeiAL
is the
to Topcoat Cormfort
ring those brisk,
snappy days.
TOPCOATS:
.............29.50
......29.50 - 35.00
as .......... 35.00

Here is another of those Harmon
stories. Evashevski swears this is
true. It happened in the Boston
railway station last Friday morn. The
team had just marched out of its
train and a large crowd had gathered
to see the sights.
Two kids in particular were romp-
ing around through the jammed plat-
form trying to locate Harmon. They
kept racing from one gridder to an-
other asking each if he were Tom
Harmon. The players smiled grace-
fully, and then the kids went on.
Finally they came up to Harmon.
"Is you Tom Harmon," the little
lad cherped.
Tom gracefully smiled but refused
to reveal his true identity.
"Ain't you he," questioned the
same wee lad, trying desperately
to make sure.
Just then his companion rapped
him on the shoulder and the little
kid quickly turned around. '
"Hey, Jim," broke forth the com-
panion, "sure dat's him, ya big
dummy."
"Dontcha see his nose."
* * *
Just three more shopping days un-
til SWEET REVENGE.
'M' CLUB NOTICE
There will be a meeting of the
M" Club at 8 p.m. today at
the Union.
Bill Combs, President

FROSH NOTICE
All Freshmen classified for
physical education in Waterman
Gymnasium are requested by Dr.
C. A. May to procure their lockers
this week. Locker tickets may be
purchased at the Cashiers Office
located in the South Wing of Uni-
versity Hall.

I

DETROIT, Oct. 16. -(AP)- Steve'
O'Neill, former manager of the
Cleveland Indians and pilot of the
Buffalo Bisons of the International
League last season, was signed today
as a coach by the Detroit Tigers.
O'Neill replaces Ralph (Red) Kress,
who was released a week ago to ac-
cept a managerial post at St. Paul
in the American Association.
NEW YORK, Oct. 16. -(A)-- Four
juniors won line positions on the
Associated Press All-America football
team a year ago. One of them, Harvey
McCollum, Tulanes huge tackle, is
ineligible this season. The other three
-Paul Severin, North Carolina end;
Nick Drahos, Cornell tackle; and Ed
Molinski, Tennessee guard, are faced
now with extraordinary competition
all along the line.

i.

1

6-Ott

ri

Associated Press
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