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October 10, 1940 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-10-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4

don wirtchafter's
DAILY DOUBLE

O1n~ Coin ebiw1t-Trail

35 Wolverines
Leave Tonight
For Cambridge!

Pass SmacI(hitig Endl

MNitllll' S peedhall I Ivettion
Proves Boon To 1-M Athleties

By HAL WILS4

ON

Dear Double Trouble . . .
We found this informative note in
our box yesterday:
Dear Don:
On Saturday next, at about one
o'clock in the afternoon, thirty red-
shirted, beefy young men will trot
out of their locker room and begin
warming up, preparatory to play-
ing at football with a team repre-
senting the University of Michigan.
We say thirty men with consider-
able trepidation; there are so many
things that can keep a Harvard
man from his football, like a good
show at the Orpheum or maybe a
clinch in the feature at the Rock-
Ingham.
It should not be thought by our
uninitiated readers that the custom-
ary lusty yells and catcalls will greet
these football players. Instead, they
will trot to their bench unhalled,
leave their K copies of Socrates and
Goethe thereon, and run out on the
turf without so much as a whisper
raised in their behalf. The only
cheers at this time will come from
drunks, shills or color-blindiWolver-
ine rooters. Harvard spirit, you
know.
When game time comes, Capt.
Joseph Raleigh Gardella will shake
hands with our own Forest Evashev-
ski and gallantly offer him the choice
of calling the toss. Whatever the
coin reveals, the Crimsoiite will
speak to Evie in accents broad and
dulcet, bow out of the conversation
and walk over to ask his boys if they
are ready to have at the Westerners.
And as far as Harvard and her root-
ers are concerned, the game might as
well end here. Harvard will lose.
When we say Harvard will lose,
we do not mean any 7-6 decision in

favor of the visitors. We do not
mean even a 12-6 or 21-6 victory
by Michigan, nor yet a moral vic-
tory for the Crimson when they
hold their opponents to thirty
points. We are going to stick our
reeks out and predict that Mich-
igan will win overwhelmingly.
To those of you who come to the
East to see this game, with nothing
more than a healthy mind and a
superiority complex, the men from
Cambridge will be just as much fod-
der for the hungry Michigan football
machine. Just another pushover like
California or Ohio State. We think
we do no one an injustice by saying
that this is precisely so, or that it
has been this way for many years.
Yet how many of us who will sit
there Saturday, drinking in the spec-
tacle of Back Bay blue bloods being
spilled, realize that there was a time
when Michigan couldn't win at any
price? A time, in fact, when Mich-
igan lost her first four games with
Harvard. How many of you will re-
call the difficulty Michigan had in
downing the Crimson the two times,
they did win? Not many, we wager,
and none will recall it with pleasure.
Michigan's first three encoun-
ters with Harvard took place in
1881, 1883 and 1895 and, beyond'
the fact that Michigan did not win,
these early tussles are shrouded in1
'darkness.
Then, in 1914: with the destructive
line smasher, Johnny Maulbetsch,
Michigan's own came East to play
one of Harvqrd's greatest aggrega-
tions, the one headed by the immor-
tal Eddie Mahan and Tack Hard-
wick. But the Fates step in: Mahan
is injured, cannot play, and the word
goes 'round the backrooms that
Michigan is the good thing. What
happens? Hardwick scores in the
second period, kicks the point, and
Harvard is never headed thereafter.
So the Wolverines mutter coarsely to
themselves and go back to wait for
another chance.
We do- not include the little anec-
dotes above to show that Michigan
will have a hard time winning, 'or
to prove that Harvard is the great
team it was, 'Fritz' Crisler et al, and
the athletic policies of Harvard will
prove these statements to be untrue.
We merely put them here to show
that destiny's whims have made this
game what it is today and that no
team, however weak, is without
honor.
- Revere Devere III

Attempting a comeback after be-
ing forced out last year with torn'
ligaments in his knee, Paul Kromer
was named yesterday to make the
trip to Harvard as right halfback.
Paul played in the Michigan State
game and got off a 48-yard punt.
Sixty Frosh Track
Candidates Report
Although few students know that,
track is a fall sport in the University,
some sixty freshman candidates
found their way to the field house
last week to get their "spikes."
Sixty may seem a large number of
men, but only a small group of them
aspire to try for the field events: i.e.
the pole vault, high jump, broad
jump, javelin throw, discus throw,
and shot put. Coach Stackhouse at-
tributes this to the above-mentioned
fact that few know of the fall sport.
He therefore encourages anyone who.
is interested in track, and who is
willing to report regularly to work,
to come out right away.
"No experience of any sort is neces-
sary,' Stackhouse said, for some of
the best trackmen were never record-
breakers in high school."
Anyone who, is interested may re-
port at the field house any afternoon.
INTRAMURAL NOTICE
Those undergraduate students
who live in private houses and
want to play touch football should
call in person at the Intramural
office or phone 2-2101 not later
than today.

Norm Call Still On Injured
List; Team Drills Pass
Offense, Harvard Plays
Coach Fritz Crisler yesterday af-
ternoon named an incomplete squad
of 32 gridders who will leave for Bos-
ton tonight for the Wolverines' game
with Harvard. Saturday.
The list includes: Ends: Ed Fru-
tig, Joe Rogers, Harlin Fraumann,
Ed Czak, Rudy Smeja and Phil
Sharpe; Tackles: Al Wistert, Reuben
Kelto, Jack Butler and Bob Flora:
Guards: Milo Sukup, Ralph Fritz,
Bob Kolesar, Bill Melzow, Leo Cun-
ningham and John Laine; Centers:
Bob Ingalls, Clarence Hall and Ted
Kennedy.
Quarterbacks: Captain Forest Eva-
shevski, George Ceithaml and Harry
Kohl; Halfbacks: Tom Harmon,
Dave Nelson, Paul Kromer, Bob Krej-!
sa, Cliff Wise and Elmer Madar;
Fullbacks: Bob Westfall, Harold
Lockard, Bob Zimmerman and Jim
Grissen.
Three More To Go
Crisler further revealed that two
or three more men, including two
tackles, will be added to the squad at
the conclusion of today's practise.
The name of Norm Call, first-string
halfback, was tentatively omitted
from the list. Call's injured ankle
has not responded to treatment as
well as Trainer Ray Roberts had ex-
pected, and the Norwalk, Ohio jun-
ior may not make the trip to Cam-
bridge.
The Varsity had little difficulty
stopping Harvard plays put on by a
reserve team in yesterday afternoon's
drill. The Crimson's intricate system
of reverses and spinners, ran off by
a substitute backfield composed of
Frank Day, Paul Gannatel, Mike
Megregian and George Manolakas,
proved no mystery to the Wolverine!
regulars.
Receivers Get Workout
Coach Crisler also changed the di-
rection of the playing field and had
the Varsity run off a series of pass-
ing plays with the sun in the eyes of
the receivers.Since Harvard Sta-
dium is laid out in an east-west di-
rection, Crisler wanted his ends and
backs to become accustomed to the
pass-snatching conditions they may
encounter in the late afternoon of
Saturday's game.
Despite the squad's excellent spirit
and physical condition, Crisler re-
fused to wax over-confident about
Saturday's encounter. "I'm expecting
a hard game," he announced yester-
day. "Harvard was probably 'under
wraps' against Amherst, and will be
pointing for a victory over their first
major opponent."
Sports Staff Seeks
Sophomore Talent
How would you like to be a sports
writer? How would you like to be-
come acquainted with Michigan ath-
letes? Would a by-line thrill you at
all?
No, this isn't a quiz program; just
an old-fashioned plea for scholas-
tically eligible sophomores and sec-
ond semester freshmen to try out for
The Daily sports staff.
There are no strings attached to
this offer. Just bring yourself down
to the Publications Building any af-
ternoon this week, present yourself
to the Sports desk and say "I would
like to become a member of the
Daily sports staff." That's all there
is to it.
Any student who has had writing
experience is asked to report, and
those who have had no experience
are also urged to come out.
- t

Vi
r
c
e
c
It
C
kC
YC

If necessity is the mother of in-
'ention then perhaps Elmer Mitchell.
>irector of Intramural Athletics.
:ould be called the father.
For it was just nine years ago that
Michigan's Intramural Department
was faced with the need of finding a
all sport which would fulfill to best
advantage the multifold require-
nents desired by I-M officials. This
called for an activity from which a
maximum number of participants
ould derive the greatest amount of
enjoyment, yet dovetailing in ac-
ceptable manner with available In-
tramural facilities.
No easy task, this, to find such an
ideal autumn sport, but Mitchell
bent his head to the problem at
hand, and eventually came up with
the invention-speedball. This new
activity combined to good advantage
the passing such as that used in foot-
ball and basketball and the footwork
much the same as utilized in soccer.
Played by two nine-man teams on
a field 240 feet long and 160 feet
wide, speedball capitalized on the
speed of basketball, the action of
soccer, and the thrills of football,
combining the best points of each
sport into a cohesive new form of
athletic endeavor.
And it didn't take long for the em-
bryonic activity to attain a prom-
inent berth in the Intramural pro-
gram. Then it spread to other
schools and universities, as its possi-
bilities and potentialities were real-
ized more and more. Today speed-
ball is providing action for athletes
on an international scale, enthusias-

Here is tall, blond-haired Joe
Rogers, regular left end of the
Wolverine varsity. Joe teams up
with Ed Frutig to form one of the
smoothest working flank combina-
tions in the Conference.

tie adherents partic pating in such
foreign nations as China. Mexico, the
Philippines and Canada.
Another fraternity speedball cam-
paign will get under way here on the
Wolverine campus next Monday with
Sigma Chi back again to defend its
1939 crown against the determined
bids of about 40 other fraternity out-
fits.
Yes, papa Mitchell's baby has de-
veloped into quite a healthy, husky
youngster.

'M' CLUB MEETING
There will be an important
'M' Club meeting at 8 p.m. to-
night in the Union.
Bill Combs, President
They're
~~ Here!
A Real Assortment
./ of Fine Overcoats
MANGORAS-
TWEEDS
COVERTS
19.75-25.75
30.00
Especially Tailored
For Us by HYDE PARK
"walk a Few Steps Snd Save Dollars"
ERNIE KUOHN'S
Clothes Shop
122 East Liberty Phone 8020
(on the corner next to the P. Bell)
~ ~

Detroit's Star
Second Sacker
Ready To Quit'
Gehringer's Back Ailment
To Force Retirement;
TigersHard Hit
DETROIT, Oct. 9. -(M-)- Quiet
Charley Gehringer, whose modesty
was surpassed only by the ability
which made him one of the greatest
second-basemen in baseball history,
is ready to quit the sport he loves.
A back ailment suffered while
shoveling snow from the sidewalk in
front of his Detroit home last Febru-
ary so impaired Gehringer's effec-
tiveness, he told a newspaperman
friend last night, that "I can't field
to my left because every time I stoop
over for a ball there's a terrible pain
in my side."
"There were times this season
when I didn't think I could finis
a game," the 37-year-old Fowlervilfe
veteran reported. "I've taken so
many heat treatments this year that
I feel like a boiled oyster."
"I may change my mind next
spring, but I don't think I will,"
Gehringer said. "When a ball player
doesn't enjoy batting practice any-
more I think it's time for him to
quit. And I certainly don't enjoy it.
Gehringer's play in the World
Series was disappointing. He batted
.214, left 16 runners on base and hit
into three double plays. Twice he
walked and once he drove in a run.
Read The Daily Classifieds

.,

MEN

I

A New Shipmnent has just
arrived of very smart
SPORT COATS for fall.
We now have a very complete selection of
coats in Tweeds and plains in camel shades
as well as blue or green . . . $12.50
SLACKS to go with sport coats-all sizes
and prices from $2.95 to $6.95-wools, co-
verts and gabardines.
"Compare our prices"

NOT IMAGINARY GENi, BUT
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COME OUTOFTHE BOTTLE AND
INTO YOUR PEN.
-WHEN YOU FILL IT WITH PARKER
lOuiuk

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FOR MEN WHO DEMAND THE BEST

IfEflZTOGGE RY
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We frankly admit that you
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for as much as $10.00,more
that will compare with the
quality of fabric, the tail-

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See

these clothes tomorrow. En-
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at a savings.
ALL MODELS-ALL SIZES

New Si
and
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By
Michaels-
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$30 to $40
Other fine
makes from
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Furnishings
and
Sportweo r
Jayson Shirts
and
Pajamas
$1.65 and $2.00
Holeproof
Hosier*y
35c an 50c
Bradley
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wembley Ties
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Coats
up

I

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