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August 18, 1941 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-08-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MICHIAN DAILYTs

Lasses Named '
For Extension
'Service Here
C. A. Fisher Announces
16 Courses Available
In Second Semester
Sixteen extension courses will be
available in Ann Arbor during the
second semester of 1940-41, Dr.
Charles A. Fisher, director of the Un-
iversity Extension Service, announced
yesterday..
Among the courses will be one in
badminton in which both men and
women may enroll. It is a noncredit
course lasting sixteen weeks under
the instruction of Mr. James and will
meet at 7:30 p.m. today in the Sports1
Building.
A body conditioning course of gen-
eralized exercises will be offered for
adult-women. Noncredit courses, eight
weeks. Under Miss Helsel. To be held
in 14 Barbour Gymnasium. Times
given on request.
Modern Literature
Contemporary literature and
drama. Noncredit course. Lectures to
be given March 13, April 10, and May
15 at 10:00 a.m. at the League.
Drawing and Painting. Emphasis
will be placed on composition and
technique. Noncredit, sixteen weeks.
Mr. Weddige. 7 p.m. Thursday in
Room 407 of the architecture col-
lege.
Fine Arts 127. American Painting.
A critical and historical consideration
of painting in the United States from
colonial times to the present. Two
hours credit. Miss Adams. Today at
7:30 p.m. in Room D of Alumni Me-
morial Hall.
French 51a. Beginning French. The
aimof this course is to give the stu-
dent fluency in reading French, stress
being laid on pronunciation and
translation. The study of grammar
will be reduced to the essentials nec-
essary for mastery of the material
presented. Two hours credit. Dr.
Hootkins. Given at 7:00 p.m., Thurs-
day, in Room 205 Romance Language
Building.
Golf Classes
Golf. This course offers individual
instruction to beginners as well as
to those desiring more advanced
work. Group meets Tuesdays and
Thursdays for eight weeks. Noncredit
course. Mrs. Hanley. First meeting
at 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, April 1.
Golf. Noncredit course, sixteen
weeks. Mr. Courtright. Today at 7:00
p.m. in the Sports Building.
Hygiene 109. Principles of Public
Health Nursing. The background and
development of public health nursing;
fundamental principles and objectives
of public health nursing. Two hours
credit. Miss Herringshaw. 2432 Uni-
versity Hospital. Wednesday.
Music B42. Masterpieces in Musical
Literature. No previous knowledge of
,rmdc is necessary. Two hours credit.
Assistant Professor McGeoch. 206
'Burton Memorial Tower. Wednesday,
February 19, 7 p.m.
Studies In Sculpture
Sculpture. Studies in sculpture for
beginning and advanced students.
Noncredit course. Ten weeks. Associ-
ate Professor Fairbanks. 403 Univer-
sity Hall. Tuesday, February 18, 7:30
p.m.
Speech 31. Practical Public Speak-
ing for Business People. Two hours
credit. Assistant Professor Moser.
4203 Angell Hall. Tuesday. February
18, 7:30 p.m.
Squash, swimming, and tennis
Noncredit courses, sixteen weeks. Mr.
-Weir, Mr. Mann, Mr. Johnstone.
Sports Building. Tuesday, February
18, 7 p.m.

Faxon To Give
OrganRecital
Selections From Handel,
Vivaldi To Be Played
George Faxon, organist and choir-
master at the St. Andrews Epesco-
pal Church here, will open the Schoo
of Music's second series of organ re
citals at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in Hil
Auditorium.
Among the selections which will bE
heard are Vivaldi's "Allegro from
Concerto in A minor," Pescetti's "Al
legro," Handel's "Concerto in B flat
No. 2," Brahm's Choral, "Dock Thy
self, My Soul," Schumann's "Canoe
in B minor" and "Aria da Chiesn" b3
an unknown composer.
Faxon will also play Liszt's Intro
duction and Fugue from "Ad nos, a
salutarem undam," Titcomb's "Re
gina Cooli-Antiphon," Parker's Alle
gretto from "Sonata in E flat minor,
Bingham's "Twilight at Fiesole" an
Dupre's "Prelude and Fugue in t
minor."
A student at various times of suc
noted organists as Albert Snow, Mm
Moritz and Homer C. Humphrey
Faxon was awarded the Fellowshi
Degree from Trinity College, Londor
in 1939.

DAILY OFFICIAL
I BULLETIN

the lectures so that they may pass
the final examination, thereby com-
pleting the requirement.

i

(Continued from Page 4)
years experience or three years Uni-
versity training and 6 years experi-
ence. Closing date February 27, 1941.
The changes in closing dates have
been made on announcements made
previously, as follows:
Chief Engineering Draftsman, Prin-
cipal Engineering Draftsman, Senior
Engineering Draftsman, Engineering
Draftsman, Assistant Engineering
Draftsman, until further notice.
A course in marine drafting or
naval architecture given under the
Federal Office of Education Train-
ing Program may be substituted for
3 months of the required ship-draft-
ing experience.
Chief Engineering Aid (Aeronauti-
cal), Principal Engineering Aid (Aero-
nautical), Senior Engineering Aid
(Aeronautical) Engineering Aid (Aer-
onautical) and Assistant Engineering
Aid (Aeronautical) until June 30,
1942. Also substitution of education
for experience.
Senior Civil Engineer, Civil En-
gineer, Associate Civil Engineer,
Assistant Civil Engineer, until June
30, 1941. Applicants who have not
completed the full two years study
required, but possess either a Com-
mercial Pilot license or Private Pilot
cense and sufficient solo flying hours
to qualify them for a Commercial
Pilot license will be regarded as hav-
ing met the specified 2-year educa-
tional requirement.
Last Year Lewis Untermyer was on
campus and while here recorded
some of his original poetry. The
10-inch record contains the follow-
ing poems: A Parady on Mother
Goose Rhymes, Prayer, and Caliban
in the Coal Mines. A limited num-
ber of these records are still avail-
able at Broadcasting Service, cor-
ner of Jefferson and State streets
for a reasonable sum.
Academic Notices
Biological Chemistry Seminar to-
night in Room 319, West Medical
Building, at 7:30. "Microbial Agents
in the Study of Biological Problems"
will be discussed. All interested are
invited.
Mathematics Orientation Seminar:
Meeting to arrange hours on
Wednesday, Feb. 19, at 4:00 p.m. in
3001 A.H.
Zoology Proseminar, 2521. The
students wishing to take the pro-
seminar in the history of zoology
will please meet in room 2116 N.S.,
Wednesday, February 19, at 5:00
p.m. to decide on a suitable hour
for regular meetings.
English 190, Junior Honors: The
first meeting of the class will be on
Wednesday, February 19, from 4:30
to 5:30 p.m., in 2225 A.H.
Bennett Weaver
English 298: Students in my sec-
tion of English 298 will meet on
Thursday, Feruary 20, at 4:30 p.m.
!in Room 3216 Angell Hall.
E. A. Walter
English 232, Studies in Elizabethan
Literature: Students electing Eng-
lish 232 will meet to decide on class
hours in 2211 A.H. at 4:00 p.m. on
Wed.. Feb. 19.
English 300E, Ancient and Renais-
sance Criticism. There will be a pre-
liminary meeting today at 4:00 p.m
in 3232 A.H.
P
Speech 312 (Methods and Prob-
lems in Linguistic Science), will mee
tonight at 7:00 in Room 2006.
Psychology 98 will meet in Roon
2116 Natural Science Bldg. instea
of 212 Angell Hall.
Psychology 38, 138: All laboratory

students in these courses are expect-
ed to attend a preliminary lectur<
on Thursday, Feb. 20, at 5:00 p.m
in Room 3126. Final arrangemen
of laboratory sections will be mad(
- at this time.
- Discussion sections in these course
l will meet this week.
Laboratory sections will have their
l first meetings next week.
e German Make-up Examination. A]
n students must bring written permis
- sion from their instructors and reg
ister in the office 204 U.H. befor
- Friday, February 21, to be eligibl
n to take the make-up examination,
y in German I, II, 31, and 32 to b
announced later.
I-
s Required Hygiene Lectures for Wo
- men, 1941: All first and second sem
- ester freshmen women are require
to take the hygiene lectures, whic
d are to be given the second semeste:
C Upperclass women who have not com
pleted the hygiene lectures, or thei
h equivalent Hygiene 101, should als
e. enroll for these lectures, at the timr
y, of regular classification at Waterma
p Gymnasium. Any women who di
n, not complete the lecture series i
a previous year are urged to atten

Students should enroll for one of
the following sections. Each section
vill meet at the same hour and day
each week for seven weeks.
Section No. 1, Monday, 4:15-5:15.
Date of first meeting, February 24;
Room: Natural Science Aud.
Section No. 2: Tuesday, 4:15-5:15.1
Date of first meeting, -February 25;
Room: Natural Science Aud.
These lectures are a graduation re-
quirement.
Margaret Bell, M.D.
Medical Adviser to Women
Concerts
University Musical Society will pre-
sent the Budapest String Quartet;

Josef Roismann, First Violinist; Al-
exander Schneider, Second Violinist;
Boris Kroyt, Violist, and Mischa
Schneider, 'Cellist, in the Ninth Chor-
al Union concert, Thursday, February
20, at 8:30 o'clock in Hill Auditorium.
The program will consist of com-
position by Brahms, Schubert, Wolf
and Beethoven.
Sonata Recital: Wassily Besekirs-
ky, Violinist, and Joseph Brinkman,
Pianist will present a Facult Concert
tonight at 8:30 in the Lydia Mendels- E
son Theater. The program, compli-
mentary to the general public, will
consist of sonatas by Beethoven, Si-
belius and Franck.
Organ Recital: George Faxon,
guest artist on the Organ Recital
Series, will present selections by

carly Italian masters and American
composers Wednesday, Feb. 19, at
4:15 p.m. in Hill Auditorium. The
concert will be open to the general
public.
Lectures
University Lecture: Mrs. Elizabeth
Prytz, Secretary of the University
Library of Oslo, Norway, will lecture
on the subject, "Conditions in Nor-
way Since the German Invasion" (il-
lustrated) under the auspices of the
University Library and Department
of Library Science at 4:15 p.m. to-
day in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
The public is cordially invited.
University Lectures: The Honorable
Edwin Lowe Neville, recently Ameri-
can Minister to Thailand, will give

the following lectures under the au-
spices of the Political Science De-
partment at 4:15 p.m. in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre:
February 24: "TIhe Far Eastern
Background."
February 26: "Frontiers in East
Asia."
March 3: "The Consolidation of
Japan."
March 5: "Far EasternReactions to
Western Penetration."
The public is cordially invited.
University Lecture: Dr. Georg
Steindorff, Professor Emeritus of
Egyptology and former Director of
the Egyptological Collection, Uni-
versity of Leipzig, will lecture on the
subject, "Masterpieces of Egyptian
Sculptors," under the auspices of
the Institute of F-ine Arts at 4:15 p.m.

on Tuesday, February 25, in the
Rackham Amphitheatre. The pub-
lic is cordially invited.
University Lecture: Dr. Reinhold
Schairer, formerly Lecturer in Com-
parative Education, London Univer-
sity, will lecture on the subject, "Re-
construction of Europe by Education"
under the auspices of the Department
of German at.4:15 p.m. on Thursday.
February 27, in the Rackham Le-ture
Hall. The public is cordially invited.
University Lecture: Charles E. Kel-
logg, Chief of Soil Survey Division,
U.S. Department of Agriculture,
Washington, D.C. and member of
Association of American Geographers,
will lecture on the subject, "The Sci-
entist and Agricultural Policy in a
(Continued on Page 7)

,zt .

A

CO-ED

Speaks Her Mind
When a Michigan man takes us coeds out, the
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to see her date in a freshly laundered shirt done
in a professional manner, and you just can't get
that professional touch from home laundering.
But you don't have to be a millionaire to wear pro-

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1 Pair of Pajamas
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3 Shirts
6 Handkerchiefs
3 Pai rs of Socks
2 Bath Towels

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