100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 08, 1941 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-06-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

VTIAT. , 3UN'E S, 1941

N,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FAGS NINA

U I

Engineers Will Convene Here
T o discuss Education Problems

Engineering, professional and fac-,
ulty men from all over the country
will meet in Ann Arbor June '23
through June 27 for the forty-ninth
annual meeting of the Society for the
Promotion of Engineering Education.
Addressing the first of the four gen-
eral sessions to be held at the confer-
ence on "Science and Technology in
the Engineering Curricula," will be
President Alexander G. Ruthven,
while Dean Ivan 1C. Crawford of the
College of Engineering will give the
address of welcome.
Adding to the activity of the five-
day conference will be inspection trips
to nearby automobile laboratories, as
well as tours through the various cam-
pus labs.
General sessions will be held every
morning, while conference of the dif-
ferent engineering branches will be
scheduled for the afternoon program,
Prof. E. L. Eriksen, chairman of the
engineering mechanics department
and chairmannofnthe local central
committee, announcesi.
The engineering subjects to be tak-
en up at the meeting will be aeronaut-
ical engineering, chemical engineer-
ing, civil engineering, comprehensive

examinations, cooperative engineer-
ing, electrical engineering, engineer-
ing drawing, engineering economy,
engineering research, English, evening
engineering education and industrial
engineering.r
Further subjects will be instruction-
al methods, junior colleges, labor re-
lations, mathematics, mechanical en-
gineering, mechanics, mineral tech-
nology, personal development, physics
and technical institutes.
Serving as chairmen of local com-
mittees are Professor Eriksen, Prof.
C. T. Olmsted of the engineering
mechanics department, housing; Prof.
S. S. Atwood of the electrical engin-
eering department, registration; Prof.
C. F. Kessler of the mechanical en-
gineering department, schedule; Prof.
C. C. Brandt of the English depart-
ment, entertainment.
Draftee Quota Increased
LANSING, June 7.-1P)-Michi-
gan's July quota of draftees today
was increased to 5,655 with notifica-
tion of the state selective service
headquarters that 177 Negroes would
be added in the call.

a
_ j
1 o f
V
'dN .r
m'
I, "
t. x
,'
O.
1 - r
.
:r, ,,
7 n s.+ "
/" tiX u
:: 2 a;+ F: {:
ti
' } i.
}
}. ,
"
'
..

Summer Clinic
For Band smen
To Be Offered
Study, Concerts Planned
In Three-Week Course;
Revelli WillSupervise
More than 100 high school band
students are expected to attend the
sixth annual Band Clinic sponsored
by the School of Music which will be
held here from July 5 to 27.
The clinic will again be under the
supervision of William D. Revelli,
conductor of the Michigan Bands
and associate professor of wind in-
struments in the School of Music. He
will be assisted in instruction by sev-
eral members of the music school
staff.
Intensive study of new band com-
positions, participation in concerts in
Hill Auditorium and Ferry Field, and
private instruction and practice on
musical instruments will compose the
program of the three-week Clinic.
Morton Gould, composer and con-
ductor from New York City, will take
a post as guest conductor as will
lMark Hindsley, of the University of
Illinois, Dale Harris. director of in-
strumental music in Pontiac public
schools and Cleo Fox, director of in-
strumental music in Kalamazoo pub-
lic schools.
Public performances of the band
during the Clinic include two con-
certs in Hill Auditorium, two half-
hour broadcasts, a solo and ensemble
recital and a grand concert at Ferry
Field at which time the Clinic Bad i
and the University Summer Session
Band;, a total of 300 pieces, will be
combined.
Housing of those attending the
Clinic will be in residence halls of
the University-Mosher-Jordan for
girls and West Quadrangle for boys.
i-i7 -- - -
s. -i I
and all around the town! No
matter how numerous the er-
rands, how lengthy the shop-
ping list, Kali-sten-iks Madam-
ettes stay comfortable. A shoe
made for foot health and
smartly styled as well.
HILP KEEP GOOD FEET HEALTHY

Brookin's Shoes
108 E. Washington
phone 2-2681

Prof. Elmer Mitchell To Serve
On U.S. Recreation Committee

By EDMUND GROSSBERG
Prof. Elmer D. Mitchell, director
of intramural sports, was recently
chosen to serve with prominent fig-
ures in the sports world on an Army
and Navy athletic committee of the
Welfare and Recreation division of
the armed forces.
Professor Mitchell is now in Wash-
ington attending the organization
meeting of the Subcommittee on Ath-
letics, which Elmer Layden, com-
missioner of professional football;
Lou Little, Columbia University foot-
ball coach; Clark Griffith, owner of
the Washington Senators baseball
club; Grantland Rice, famous sports
writer; and others have been invited
to serve on.
Purpose of the committee is to act
as an advisory body to chiefs of the
Morale Branch of the Army and Navy
on problems of athletic recreation.
Lieutenant-Commander Gene Tun-
ney, Commander John Reynolds of
the Navy and Major Theodore Bank
of the Army will be able to call on
individual members of the committee
for help and advice in different sec-
tions of the country.
Joint Army and Navy Committee
on Welfare and Recreation was or-
ganized in February at the request
of Secretary of War Henry Stimson
and Secretary of the Navy Frank
- a

y .. .

Knox in order to obtain civilian ad-
vice and assistance on the leisure-
time activities of the armed forces.
Representatives of various special-
ized fields of interest are being drawn
together into subcommittees such as
the Subcommittee on Education un-
der Clarence Dykstra's chairmanship,
and the Subcommittee on Entertain-
ment under the chairmanship of Rob-
ert Sherwood.
Other members of the athletic
subcommittee are Major John Grif-
fith, chief of the Western Confer-
ence Service Bureau; John Kieran,
sports editor; Dana X. Bible, Uni-
versity of Texas football coach;
sports writer Bill Cunningham;
sportscaster Bill Stern, and sports
writer Wilbur Smith.-
Bomber Parts
At Ford Plnt
Company Will Produce
Large Landing Gears
In 'Educational Order'
DETROIT, June 'I.-GP)---The Ford
Motor Company expects to be turning
out massive landing gears for the
28-ton B24-D bomber planes months
before the huge plane parts plant
it is erecting near Ypsilanti, Mich.,
is ready for production.
This was disclosed today by Edsel
Ford, president of the Ford Motor
Co., when he said that work on "an
education order" already is under way.
Because the tricycle landing gear
presents one of the "tough" produc-
tion problems, he said, the Ford Com-
pany has set aside a section of its
tire building factory at the River
Rouge to get work on the so-called
"Oleos" started with a minimum of
delay.
"Within a week or 10 days," Ford
said today, "the first of the three part
strut sections of the landing gears
will be completed. While these parts
are being inspected by the Army Air
(?orps, we'll be organizing a depart-
ment in the tire plant " to produce
landing gears for five bombers a
day."
The entire production unit can be
moved to the new bomber plant later,
he added, when it is ready for occu-
pancy late this year.
Actual production at the bomber
plant probably will not be undertaken
until after next January 1, although
considerable progress is being made
in the construction work.

Sorority Is Granted
Per mt F orAddition
The Beta Delta Chapter of Kappa
Kappa Gamma, national sorority, has
been granted a permit for a $28,000°
addition and remodeling of its house
at 1204-08 Hill Street, Mrs. William.
C. Walz, national housing director,
announced today.
The new addition will replace an
older adjoining building which has
already been razed. The new annex
will include a kitchen, upper floor
study halls and a small dormitory.
A basement recreation room is also
planned.
One of the oldest national college
sororities, the campus chapter of
Kappa Kappa Gamma celebrated its
fiftieth birthday last fall.

Des . thk

news
1/It
dorms't

I AILY 0F1;FICIAL 1.Z
BUL LETIN
(Continued from Page 7)
10:30 a.m. Kindergarten and Pri-
mary Depts. of Church School.
10:45 a.m. Services of Public Wor-
ship. Dr. L. A. Parr will preach on
the subject, "Are We Zidonians?"
Unitarian Church: Summer Ses-
sion services will begin on July 6r
both morning and evening.
Ann Arbor Society of Friends meets
today in Lane Hall. Silenit meeting
for worship at 5:00 p.m. All interested
are inyited.

4

By GLORIA NISHON
Activities have hit a new low in
the dorms on campus. Perhaps it's
the weather, no doubt, no doubt . .
In the women's dorms, social events
have been narrowed down to a couple
of birthday parties. Stockwell held
theirs Wednesday and Mosher Thurs-
day.
Adelia Cheever held a special din-
ner for outgoing seniors Thursday.
Dolores Sterzik and Sonia Savage
were the members of the class of
41 who were honored. Mrs. Ed-
ward M. Bragg and Mrs. Thorpe,
both members of the Board of Pa-
tronesses of Adelia Cheever, will
give the presents to the seniors.
Mrs. Byrl Fox Bacher was also a
guest at the dinner. The seniors
presented the house with a record of
the song they sang for the Lantern
Night Sing in which they won first
prize. Additional honors made by
Adelia Cheever girls were also recog-
nized.
A rChitectrre College
Anno unees Wininers
In Design Contests
Winners of several awards in de-
sign were announced recently by the
office of the College of Architecture
and Design.
Duplicate prizes of $5 each for com-
petition in advanced courses in de-
sign were given to Ralph Peterson,
Jr., '41A, and Walter Johnson, '42A.
The project for these courses was the
design of an open-air theatre.
John Boone, '42A, and Charles
Lauzon, '43A, were winners respec-
tively of $10, $6 and $6, for design-
ing a wooden passerelle over a high-
way. These students competed with
others from basic courses in archi-
tectural design.
A one year subscription to the
American Artist magazine was given
to both Dorothy Visscher, '44A, and
Albert Chipman, '44A. This prize
was awarded to the two freshmen
who showed the most promise this

y
// E
ORIGINA LS
FOR JUNIORS
. o
C~s- -.e- ow I.n t"
Bows and beaus go hand in
hand with this bow-printed
S"'dress of Pebble Beach spun
rayon. The tailored blouse with
its scalloped pique collar closes
with amatching bow. inverted
" t; ~ pleats released below its pique
pockets predestine action.
China blue, bella rose
, ,; ' '-: ' ,caramel. Sizes 1I-17,.~,O
4 7
a/
(Others at 2.98 to 9.95)
217 S. Main 9 Nickels Arcade

r

RE.V L T F P.
I 4
Have you ever heard of a woman who
couldn't always use another pair of
hose? Of course you haven't! That's
why we suggest TOWNWEAR--Stock-
ings of Matchless Beauty. Noted for
their flawless sheerness, perfect fit and.
longer wear these famous TOWNWEARS
are a gift that any woman will really
appreciate. 'S9e and $1.00

1 .
i
.
a
1
7
'y
T
S{

_ N

(3 pairs for $2.85)
May we suggest
JEWELRY
GLOVES
SL P Sn.

3L1 L'

HO USECOA TS
NEfCKWEAR

BELTS
Priced around $1 and $1.95

--jIyear in decorative design.,_ v
FOR TLL lE Gr 1DI r TEr
_ ,
j A pure silk slip with' 4,
step-ins to match,
Daintily trimmed
, ,^5 't& wi th lace or em-
Y.kf ' broidery./
1 ,<White or teca-rose.
4,;:
%' ! }J.
f'7,
?/ ,
{-
9''.(1JL ' ' -1

F FOR A LL S U
e~
i ai
an
eyec
~ . ,
spar
. .
" :n.:

t

,cinrj
excellent
atcher
kling cool

White

M MER FE STIVIT IES

SYpori i
a comlimen
to taned omplxion

W LX 7.[ l a^ [ . v .. r.: a., [z i.a. i. ... ,,

,

1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan