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June 08, 1941 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-06-08

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SUJNDAYJUNE 8, 1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Craig

Wood

Captures National

Open Golf Championship

...

AP Baseball
Summaries
In A Nutshell
AMERICANS
Indians Keep Lead
Cleveland, June 7.-(P)-Jim Bag-
by today became the first Cleveland
pitcher other than Bob Feller to win
a game, in the last two weeks by
hurling a 6 to 2 triumph over Phil-
adelphia. Bagby gave up only four
hits, to keep the league-leading In-
dians two games ahead of the win-'
ning Chicago White Sox. Bagby's 4
to 2 win over St. Louis May 24 was
the last non-Feller Cleveland win.
Tigers Beat Senators .
DETROIT, June 7.-UP)-The De-
troit Tigers made it two successive
victories over the Washington Sen-
ators by winning today 10 to 6 on
a six-run wrally in the sixth inning.
Archie McKain, who came in to re-
lieve starter Johnny Gorsica, won his
first victory of the season. Steve
Sundra was the loser.-
Red Sox Streak Broken
CHICAGO, June 7.-(IP)-The Chi-
cago White Sox drove' Jack Wilson
from the mound today with a three-
run attack in the sixth inning to
beat the Boston Red Sox 5 to 4. The
defeat broke Boston's six-game win-
ning streak. Edgar Smith won his
sixth victory of the season on a nine-
hit performance.
NATIONALS
Cards Take Lead .
NEW YORK, June 7.-{)-Jimmy
Brown, Coaker Triplett and Terry
Moore each blasted four hits today
as the St. Louis Cardinals waded into
four Giant pitchers for 19 hits and an
11-to-3 victory that boosted them into
the leadership of the National League.
Reds Sink Dodgers
BROOKLYN, June 7.-{P)-Cincin-
nati scored six runs in the eighth inn-
ing today to pound Luke Hamlin from
the hill and beat the Dodgers 8 to 3.
SMajor League
,Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

r
" * Curtains For 1940-41
* Yost's Last Great Year
,e '& y HAL WILSON
Daily Sports Editor
AST COLUMNS of the year are usually saturated with sentimentality. But
a this one won't be.
Instead we'd just like to mention a few things about the past year and
then finish up with a few short items. Last September Coach Fritz Crisler's
football team traveled out to the Pacific Coast to raise the curtain on the
Wolverines' 1940-41 sports year with a 41-0 victory over California in the
Bears' huge stadium in Berkeley. Next_ week another crew of Michigan
athletes, eight trackmen, will drop that self-same curtain in the same stadi-
um at the National Collegiate track meet. In the nine months separating
these two events, a vast amount of Michigan athletic history has been
written.

Western Conference champion-
ships have been won in three sports,
tennis, baseball and swimming, and
another may be forthcoming later
this month when the golf title will
be settled at Chicago. Matt Mann's
natators also copped the National
Collegiate crown and took second
in the National AAU's. Tom Har-
mon was unanimously selected as
the outstanding football prgyer of
the nation. And so on and on. It
would take this entire paper and
more to tell all that happened. ".
Our point, however, is simple and
just this: Fielding H. Yost retires
later this month as active Director
of Athletics. Last fall the grid
squad man for man dedicated their
season to Yost's last year in active
office. It has been a great Michi-
gan sports year. And somehow we
like to feel that every bit of it was

dedicated' to the Grand Old Man
who made it all possible.
SPORTS HASH: IT's beginning
to look like husky Dick Wakefield
is going to cash in on his athletic
talents even more than Tom Har-
mon . . . the slugging sophomore
outfielder has already received a
bid of $20,000! just' as a bonus for
signing . . . and he told us that
the final figure will be at least
$25,000.
When the Chicago Tribune gets
around to booming the football All-
Star game sometime this summer,
you might remember that a con-
siderable number of Wolverine sen-
iors are eligible if they get the
votes necessary for participation
. . . Harmon, Evashevski, Frutig,
Fritz and Sukup all are definite
possibilities.

Victor Edges
Denny Shute,
Shooting 284
New Champ Has To Wear
Brace To Protect Back;
Shiite Cards 287 Total
FORT WORTH, June 7.-()-
Craig Wood, playing in a polo belt t'
protect a torn back muscle, shot a
great final 70 over the gruelling Co-
lonial Club course today to win the
U. S. Open Golf Championship with
a 72-hole score of 284, three strokes
in front of Denny Shute. It was his
second major victory of the year, for
he won the Augusta Masters in 'April.
Under a broiling sun and before
galleries that totaled some 10,000
steaming Texans, the 39-year-old vet-
eran from Mamaroneck, N. Y., stole
the championship right out from un-
der the noses of thQSe Texans who
had been sure this was going to be
the Lone Star State's own golfing
show.
Bracketed in a first-place tie at
36 holes with Denny Shute, 1940
champion Lawson Little, and Clayton
Heafner, Wood broke that deadlock
by matching par for the course with a
70 on his morning round.
This afternoon, playing last among
those with a chance to take the
title, he appeared to be wavering oc-
casionally but each time got back to
par. He closed out his round with a
thrilling 30-foot putt on the home
green that brought a ringing cheer
from the bahked ranks of spectators
and gave him another 70 for 284.
Thus the man who until this year
had been known as the "great runner-
up" captured the biggest prize of them
all - worth $1,000 of the U. S. Golf
Association's prize money, but worth
far more than that in prestige.
Two weeks ago, in a freak accident,
Wood tore one of his back muscles
and couldn't hit a shot for the next
week or ten days. There even was a
possibility he wouldn't be able to
start.
But he came down to Texas several
days ahead of time, bought a polo
belt to support his back, and pro-
ceeded to fire successive rounds of
73-71-70-70 over a course on which
only two men were able to break par
- Shute with a 69 the first day, Ben
Hogan with a 68 in today's morning
round.
ATTENTION STUDENTS
Let the Transcontinental
Freight Co. handle your per-
sonal effects, and household
goods. Service to all principle
cities. Specialists in transpor-
tation since 1898. For further
information and pick-up call-
7102 or 4491.

Ted Williams Paces American
League Batting With .436 Mark

CHICAGO, June 7.-( A)-The reign;
of terror young Ted Williams is cre-
ating among American League pitch-
ers shows little sign of abating.
For a month now the lanky, 23-
year-old Boston Red Sox outfielder
has been hitting sensationally and
over that period owns a .519 average.
He fell below that figure the last
week when he collected 10 hits in 21
tries. However, his endeavors still
were good enough to boost his sea-
son's mark seven points. Averages
that included Friday's games gave
him .436 for the year - 103 points
more than he boasted four weeks ago.
Sixty-seven points behind came Bill
Dickey of New York. The Yankee
catcher retained second place with
.369 despite a seven-point decline
when Roy Cullenbine of St. Louis
and Joe Cronin of Boston also slipped
by about the same margin. Cullen-
bine still was third with .367 and
Cronin next with .365.
Cleveland's Jeff Heath displaced
Cecil Travis of Washington when the
latter slumped 16 points to .353.
Heath had .358. Then came Travis,
followed by Barney McCosky, Detroit,
.352; Dom DiMaggio, Boston, .349;
Dick Siebert, Philadelphia, .348, and
Sam Chapman of Philadelphia and
Bruce Campbell of Detroit, each with
.340.
Lou Boudreau of Cleveland and

Sam Chapman moved into a tie with
Cronin for the most doubles. Each
boasted of 17. Likewise Cleveland's
Ken Keltner advanced on even terms
with Travis in the matter of triples
when the Washington slugger failed
to increase his seven total. However,
Rudy York of Detroit and George
Case of Washington retained their
honors. York had 13 homers and 46
runs batted in, wliile Case still was
tops with seven stolen bases.
Bob Feller stood far "ahead in the
pitching division. He added two vic-
tories and fanned 17 more batters
over the week and now has 12 vic-
tories against two defeats and a total
of 101 strikeouts.
SGOIN' HOME ?...
Then send your baggage to ye old home-
stead by RAJLwAY ExPRsSS and take your
train with peace of mina,. We call and
deliver at no extra charge within our
regular. vehicle limits in all cities and
principal towns. Service is fast, econom-
ical-and sure as shootin'! Just phone
RAILWA XPRESS
AOENQv 1NC,
NATION-WIDE RAIL-AIR SERVICE

r

-

7

ANN ARBOR fligh School won five of a possible eight titles while compet-
ing in its 5-A Conference this past year . . . and several of its out-
standing stars are slated to follow Bob Westfall to University stardom .
it appears now that Rapid Robert Feller is going to get a slash in his salary
along about August . . . it's quite a drop from $45,000 a year for throwing
baseballs to $21 a month for shouldering a musket.
This is as good a time as any to pick the Indians to cop the pennant .. .
and when the Dodgers win in the National League, a new attendance record
in World Series games will be established, for Larry McPhail is already
planning to shift Brooklyn's games to Yankee Stadium . . . Cleveland will
have the huge Municipal Stadium in which to perform . . . and while we're
predicting we might as well take Joe Louis over Billy Conn, the American
League over the National in the All-Star game, the Chicago Bears over the
Collegians in the football ditto, Cornelius Warmerdam over 15 feet 6
inches, and Clouds over Europe.
That just about winds everything up, so "30" until next fall.
Sa SplitCaliforni Series

Cleveland .... .
Chicago.........
Boston .........
New York .......
Detroit ;.... . ....,
Philadelphia,..
St. Louis"...,....
Washington......

W
32
28
24
26
27
24
16
16

L
20
20
20
22
23
24
30
34

PCt.
.615
.583
.545
.542
.540
.500
.348
.320

GB
2
4
4
4
6
13
15

CASH
FOR
YOUR
BOO A

Yesterday's Results
Detroit 10, Washington 6
Cleveland 6, Philadelphia 2
Chicago 5, Boston 4
New York 11, St. Louis 7
NATIONAL LEAGUE

EAST LANSING, June 7.-()-
Michigan State divided its two-game
baseball series with the University of
California, giving the Golden Bears
an 8-5 victory today to offset an
MSC shutout Friday.
Frank Mekules, the Spartans' No.
1 pitcher, yielded 12 hits before he
was removed in the seventh inning,
while the Bear hurler, Elmo Koll,
gave up eight hits.
Both teams came out of the first

inning tied at four-all, the Bears be-
ing aided to their scores by two Spar-
tan infield errors, while Wy Davis
homered with one on base to put
M.S.C.in the running. Ray Amling
opened the Bears' half of the third
with a home run, Eddie Ongerth,
California center fielder, scored on
a Spartan error in the fourth, and
the visitors picked up two final tallies
in the seventh.

St. Louis..... ..
Brooklyn .......
New York .......
Cincinnati......
Chicago.........
Pittsburgh ......
Boston..........
Philadelphia .....

W
34
33
22
23
20
17
15
15

L
14
14
22
25
24
23
27
30

PCt.
.708
.702
.500
.479
'°.455
,.425
,357
.333

GB
%
10
12
13
16
17%

I .. ... .. ~.. - I

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Yesterday's Results
Chicago 5, Boston 1
Cincinnati 8, Brooklyn 3
St. Louis 11, New York 3
Philadelphia 2, Pittsburgh 0
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