100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 30, 1941 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

y

FRIDA<Y, MAY 30, 1941

"TH MICHIGAN D A IVV

"At'lla VWXY

M.THE M ,,.TC.H... .a....rt: . .a alYa

-- E FIVE

5

$100

Or

New

York

Trip

To

Award

Jop

Script

NWriter

C> _______________________________.

Miss Hirsch Tells

Experiences,

Play

Synopses

Qualities, Duties Of A Costumer

Anything that has to

do with

needles comes to me, said Miss Emma
Hirsch, Dramatic Season costume'
head, from patching pockets and sew-
ing on buttons to making rugs, from
the common duties of a wife to the
complicated duties of a costumer.
Right iow Miss Hirsch is busy with
costumes for next week's play "Ladies
In Retirement." While most of the
costumes have been rented from the
original production, two dresses to
be worn by Ruth Gordon have to
be made over, and sundry odds and
ends must be repaired on the others.
1880 Bustle Styles
"Ladies in Retirement" is set in the
period around the 1880's, at a time
when the bustle type of dress began
taking a back seat in deference to
the convention styles heralded in by
the '90's. The location of the play is
a sparsely populated section of Eng-
land where change in style is retarded
by the nature and temperament of the
people.
The only male in the play is a
sleek villain and he wears a typicalr
loud checkered suit to fit his roguish
character. The murdered lady Leonora
wears ared wig which is obviously a
wig and a fussy dressing gown, in
which, Miss Hirsch said , laughing,
no college girl would be seen. Over-
loaded with jewelry, Leonora depicts
a rather subdued actress who has
seen better days but strives to fool
herself and others into believing she
is still on top.
Heavy Atmosphere
Of the two sisters who are definitely
mad but not dangerous, the strongerl

and more purposeful one wears a
heavy, straight costume while the in-
effectual sister wears an array of
lace and ruffles plus the bustle char-
acteristic of the period.
On the whole, the play breathes
a heavy atmosphere which is light-
ened somewhat by lace, ruffles and
bustles.
Costumer's Duties
The main duty of a costumer, Miss
Hirsch said, is. to fit the costume
to the character of the actor, his men-
tal mnake-up, and his part in the show.
The first thing that must be done,
she continued, is to study The ,how
as a whole, placing it into its period
and confining the color and back-
ground of the production to the possi-
bilities within the period.
Now the psychology of costuming
and color, she went on, are all very
fine as theories but each show pre-
sents a different problem. For exam-
ple, she told haw white is considered
taboo on the stage, yet last year, white
was used successfully in "Trelawny"
and the result was superb.
Actual sewing knowieage, she add-
ed, is absolutely useless in some cases
as in the construction of tall medieval
head-dresses or when glass and wood
are used and a sense of carpentry
is most vital.
Furstenburg To Speak
Dean Albert C. Furstenburg of thea
Medical School will address the On-
tario Medical Society today in Wind-
sor, Ont., on "A :Discussion of Lud-
wig's Angina and Cellulitis of the
Neck."t

To Be Written
Before July 1
Writer To Consider Production
Needs: Provision For Huge Cast,
Opportunities For Songs, Dances
An all expense paid trip to ,New
York or $100 in cash will be offered to
a Michigan playwright in return for a
clever play suitable for the annual
Junior Girls' production, announced
Janet Lewin, '43, publicity chairman
for 1942 JGP.{
The contest is pen to all under-
graduates of the University, A syn
sis of the play must be submitted
by each contestant to the central
committee on or before July 1. The
finished script must be ready by No-
vember 1.'
Specifications Named
JGP plays demand certain speci-
fications which it would be wise for
each coxtestant to keep in mind in
planning his play. They should have
three acts with a finale at the end of
the second or third act. The play-
wright should keep in mind the large
cast used in JGP productions..and
I should plan to provide from ten to fif-
teen leading roles.
Contestants must, of course, avoid
the risque. But above all, the play
must be planned to afford numerous
opportunities for bongs and dances.
May Be Comedy u
There are few limitations as to the
subject matter, Miss Lewin asserted.
The play might be a comedy or per-
haps a satir on some phase of Uni-
versity or present day life. Originality
and ingenuity of plot will be greatly
welcomed as long as JGP require-
ments are kept in mind.
The committee wishes to encourage
collaboration. To stimulate group in-
terest in' writing the play, tickets to
big campus affairs, such as May Fes-
tival and J-Hop, are to be given
as prizes to collaborators, Miss Lewin,
revealed.
Margaret Avery Is
Wyvern President
For Coming Year
Margaret Avery, '43, has been hon-
ored with election to the post of presi-
dent of Wyvern, junior women's hon-
or society, it was announced yester-,
day.
Lorraine Judson was named secre-
tary and Elizabeth Gram is the new
treasurer.
Following her election, Miss Avery
announced that the ,junior honor
society will meet for luncheon in the,
alcove of the League cafeteria Mon-
day noon to assign each Wyvern
member one of next year's freshman,
alumni scholars as a personal charge.'
Summer correspondence will inaug-
urate the adviser-charge relationship.;
All members of Wyvern, whether'
selected as orientation advisers or
not, will return for orientation week
in the fall, Miss Avery said. At that
time a tea will be held for the alumni'
scholars and society members will.
be personally introduced to the new-'
comers.

Slack
Cool,

Fo Summ
* * *

Suits Are
Attractive

F

v
;::;
.,",
.
::
..

* 00 00000000000 0
**
* 0 e
" 0
* 0
S deal
0 5
NHOMES, most ice is .used for the preservation of foods, *
* u there are many additional uses which interest every *
home maker. Successful hostesses use real ice freely in *
S the preparation. of crisp salads, frozen dessert, unusual 0
* dishes of all kinds.{
0 Air-C onditioned Ice Refrg~erotor
* 0
* Phone 3914 4 16 West H-uron '
S
I.M- 1 11iiI~ii I ! i blbl 1+ 1!1+

f, r.

* * *
Summer vacation is just about a
month away and whether you are go-
ing mountain climbing or just sun-
ning on the beach you will need some
comfortable and attractive play
clothes.
The slack suit illustrated here
should fit the bill for many occasions,
including this final week of cram-
ming. The polka-dotted rayon -ma-
terial comes in several color combina-
tions and will be cool and comfortable
for those sultry days when you feel
like lounging around
Slacks Are Well-Cut
This particular outfit is especially
flattering as the jacket top and the
well-cut slacks disguise what are all
too apt to be unattractive underpin-
n ings.
tr one may havew aslack suit of
light blue denim with the always
popular middy blouse, which should
bear up well under all the rigorous
duties of a novice sailor.
California Fashions
California is the fashion center for
summer wear and this year it has
lived up to its reputation. Movie
starlets are being seen in new long-
styled shorts that remnind you of the
short trousers your nine year old
brother wears. With these shorts
can be worn a dressy print blouse of
synthetic material, or for more rough
wear, a plain white blouse, with a
hip-length jacket of the same mater-
ial as the shorts, over it.
Whether you decide to stick to
slacks or follow the trend toward
longer shorts, you'll find that play
clothes this year have been designed
to meet all practical needs of sam-
mer vacationers.
New Design Contest
To Offer $25 Prize
For Uniform Dress
For fashion conscious collegiates
who aren't too worried by exams,
Mademoiselle offers another contest.
Competitors are asked to submit by
June 16 designs for a "campus uni-
form," a dress that will meet the
needs of the undergraduate.
Contest blanks and swatches of
the two fabrics which may be used
will be sent upon request from Made-
noiselle,East 57th Street, New York
City. The first prize winner will re-
ceive $25 and the dress she designs,
as it emerges from the shop of the
dress manufacturer who produces it.
Results of the contest, with names
of winners and a photograph of the
prize design, will be in the August
college issue.
- - - _ . _ . . _ _ _ _ _ .. _ _ _ -_ '

Bazaar Contest
Deadline To Be
Friday, June 6
New Literary Talent Is Sought;
Winning Essay Or Short Story
To Receive $100, Publication
The deadline for the writing con-
test for college students which 's
being sponsored by the editors ' of
Harper's Bazaar will close Friday,
June 6, it has been announced. Con-
testants may submit entries in short,
story form or an essay, which will
be judged from the point of, general
interest of subject, originality and
style.
The editors of the magazine are
looking for new literary talent among
college students and are prepared to
encourage a start towards a career in
writing with the award of $100 to the
winning essay or short story, which
will be published in the August issue
Harper's Bazaar.
Subjects Discussed
Among those subjects suggested to
the editors for an essay, which mnust
be within the 1200 to 3000 word limit
set for both types of entries, are those
dealing with the attitude of the col-
lege student toward the war or world
problems.
The editors would also be interested
in getting a student's opinion on his
plans for the future as they have been
altered by present-day conditions or
on whatbchanges he thinks should be
instituted in the college of tomorrow.
Rules Are Listed
The following rules pertaining to
entries in the Harper's Bazaar Writ-
ing Contest must be followed: all en-
tries must be typewritten, with the
name of the entrant appearing on
every page. Contestants should send
their summer home addresses as well
as their college addresses as the win-
ner will be notified by July 10.
Entries should be mailed to Harp-
er's Bazaar Writing Contest, 572 Mad-
ison Avenue, New York City. The edi-
tors assume no obligations to return
the non-winning entries. They also
reserve the right to edit and revise
the winning article.
Travel Board
Offers Rides
To All Points
Michigan Union's travel board -
with lists of available auto rides from
Ann Arbor to all corners of the con-
tinent - is now in the main lobby.
Students desiring rides or passen-
gers to any point may post notice
on the board through the Union Stu-
dent Offices. Only those cards
stamped by the Union will be allowed
on the board.
Hundreds of students obtain rides
- expense sharing trips - at each
vacation time, according to Bob Bur-
stein, '43, of the Union executive
staff.
Both drivers and passengers must
sigr a statement absolving the Union
of all responsibility in case of acci-
dents, Burstein said.
The board will be up until June
11 and cards may be posted at any
time before this date. Union workers
will stamp the cards every day from
3 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Student Of-
tices.

-Y
p
TO T O
.to the latest
R ECORDS
VICTOR DECCA
BLUEBIRD
COLUMBIA OKEH
(J fo.w.,.,., r ~l.0

dwindle with it; only three organiza-
tions have scheduled them for to-
day, and two are planned for tomor-
row.
The Newman Club will present an

Erikson and Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Dell
have been invited to chaperon.
Delta Delta Delta's dinner dance
will be presented from 7:30 p.m. to
midnight tomorrow at the Bartorn

Groups Will Hold Radio Dances,

-adni asVv tnmr vrrnw alash i Th Vaa
informal dance from 9 p~m. to mid- Hills Country Club. Chaperoning will
night in St. Mary's Auditorium, be Prof. and Mrs. Preston Slosson,
Chaperons will be the Rev. Msgr. Mrs. Margaret S. Whitsell and Mrs.
A. J. Babcock and Dr. and Mrs: E. J. A. Orbison.
Kempf. Phi Beta Pi has planned a radio
Theta Xi will have a picnic and a dance from 9 p.m. to 12 p.m. tomor-
dance from 4 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the row at the chapter house. Chaper-
Island and at the chapter house. ons for the affair will be Mr. and
Lt. and Mrs. M. C. Demler and Lt. Mrs. Fred Basom, Jr. and Dr. and
and Mrs. Harold Watson will chaper- Mrs, H. C. Weller.
on. Sigma Nu will have a homecom-
Triangle fraternity will hold a radio ing tomorrow for the alumni and
dance from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. at the their families.
I' ..A.._ _ _ __ _ _ _ _.__ . _ _

Formal As

N ~> "v~~~ >,

%%}
Dresses, coats and suits reduced for immediate clear-
ance. We must make rpom for summer merchandise,
so we've "CUT TO CLEAR".

\ \

'A,

%%
' .. CI ' /

DRESSES . .. COAT

Social Season

Jacket dresses, redingotes and casuals
that are perfect for travel. Better
coats and suits. Limited sizes.
(Former values to $29.75)

'%
77,

Ends

The season dwindles, and dances chapter house. Prof. and Mrs. E. L,

Less than Cost!

For All-Occasion Wear!
DRESSES
(Value; to $16.95)

DRESSES
.49
(Values to $10.95)

',j
%
/Y
'7

/7
*~<VVA' N'

f/he

C~ Cizabe~h

7DiLO1/

shop

'round the corner on S/ate

After 1)ecor atin Day

SA.1

E

__ .

)

CHURCH
DIRECTORY

0

S
I
t
t
r
V
C
J
f
r.
t;
t
n
C
C
a
d
0
p
c

Dresses
Coats
'Suits
Skirts
Ski rts
Jackets
Reversibl rsb
ReesiblS

Formerly
. 8.95 to 25.00
.' ormorly
1695 to 25.00
Formerly
12.95 to 25.a0

1/2
1/2
1/2

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine,
The Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector,
The Rev. Frederick W. Leech, Assistant,
George Faxon, Organist and Choirmaster.
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. High School Class, Harris Hall.
11:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon by
the Rev. Henry Lewis (Coroprate Commun-
ion of the Youth of the Church).
11:00 A.M. Junior Church.
11:00 A.M. Kindergarten, Harris Hall.
COLLEGE WORK PROGRAM
7:00 P.M. Open House, Harris Hall.
Wednesday, Holy Communion 1 :30 a.m.
Tuesday and Friday, Tea from 4:00 to 5:30
p.m.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Washtenaw Avenue,
William P. Lemon, D.D., Minister,
Lillian Dilts, Assistant,
William N. Barnard, Director of Music.
9:30 A.M. Church School. Classes for all age
groups.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon "God
and the Emergency" by Dr. W. P. Lemon.
10:45 A.M. Nursery during morning worship.
6:00 P.M. Westminister Student Guild. 6:00
p.m. supper and fellowship hour; 7:00 Can-
dlelight Consecration Service. Robert Gels-
ton in charge of the program.
8 :00 P.M. Th'Ye Sunday Evening Club.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State Street between Washington and Huron,
Ministers: Charles W. Brashares and
J. Edward Lantz,
Music: Hardin Van Deursen, director.
Mary Eleanor Porter, organist.
1n Rfl A tI f l......-. .. l~.t. f1 £'. . l. !~.

Formerly to, 3.95
Formerly 5.95
Corduroy - Flannel
Formerly to 6.50
s FrmCorduroy
.S For'merly to 12.50

Price
Price
Price
1.95
3.95
3.95
7.95
4.95
Price

'

Corduroy
Formerly to 7.95

)+£
I

Spring Hats in Black and
Navy straws, Pastel felts.
i fs n n _ _. __r

Hats

Black, Navy, Brown, Red
Straw and Felt

'/

No Approvals - No Exchanges - All Sales Final

11111

I liii

I

I I

I1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan