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May 30, 1941 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-30

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TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE -THREI

Nine Clinches Share Of Title; Netmen Advance

In Match

4

iIIG iI
By ART IlHLL
EVANSTON, Ill, May 29.-It was
a plenty happy bunch of Michigan
ball players that tramped off the
Northwestern diamond today after
Mase Gould's great relief pitching
had given them a strong hold on their
first Big Ten baseball championship
since 1936.
There wasn't any ostentatious show
of emotion but it was easy to see
that the boys were mighty pleased
with themselves. The locker room
banter was just a little gayer than
usual and not one of the players
seemed to have a care in the world.
There won't be any celebrating
tonight however. The Wolverines
have another contest with the Wild'
cats scheduled for tomorrow and
they aim to win it. If they do the
Conference title will be theirs for
sure, but even if they lose this one,
Iowa will have to win four straight
to tie them for the championship.
And judging from what the Hawk-
eyes have shown so far, it isn't very
likely that they will accomplish this
feat.
No, it loks as if they can start
egraving the names of the Michigan
players on those little gold baseballs
they hand out to the club which cops
the crown.
There were eight or nine big league
souts in the stands at today's battle
and they were there to look at just
two ball players, Northwestern's grid-
iron great, Bill de Correvont, and
Michigan's Dick Wakefield.
There wasn't much doubt about
who got the best of the hitting duel
between the two. De Correvont
went hitless in five trips to the
platter wihile Wakefield clouted
two of the longest home runs seen
iII these parts in many a year.
He hit the first one so far over
the Wildcat right fielder's head that
hb had rounded the bases before the
gardener had overtaken the rolling
pellet. His second time up Dick hit
a long fly to right.
Tencame the payoff. When the
Michigan long distance clubber step-
ped up to the disk with two men
aboard in the fourth inning, Dick
Fd tz, the Wildcat right fielder was
playing so deep that adnear sighted
gentleman in the stands thought he
was visiting friends in Oak Park.
It didn't do him any good, though.
Wakefield stepped into one of Bob
Motl's fast balls and it was three more
runs for Michigan. It may not mean
anything, but, at just about the time
of that hit, a few drops of rain fell
in downtown Chicago.
Best crack of the trip thus far
came from Whitey Holman before
the team had even left Ann Arbor.
Departure was delayed because a
Detroit paper wanted the boys to
put on their uniforms for a pic-
ture, to be used when they won the
championship.
So they dutifully climbed into their
suits and started warming up while
waiting for the photographer to ad-
just his apparatus. Holman was play-
ing catch with Capt. Bill Steppoh,
who has been out of the Iineup for
weeks with an injured foot. After a
few tosses, Whitey remarked:
"Well. Bil, you seem to be in pretty
fair shape except that your face
loops sort of like dried glue"
That wasn't the only gem, how-
ever. Coach Fisher came through
with a honey after Wakefield had

Michigan Tops Wildcats
Tilt AtEvanston, 9-7
Chamberlain Paces Batsimeii In C")-it
Atack; Wakefield J3e hs Two HoIers

(Continued from Page 1)
the next two men had fouled out,
both Hennerich and McKinnon tallied
on Sampson's single to left.
Michigan completed its run mak-
ing in the eighth when Nelson singled,
advanced on a sacrifice, and came
home on Chamberlain's clean base
hit into right field,
In the Wildcat half of the eighth
Stoddard pitched a single to Hen-
nerich and walked Irv Madsen. Gould
then replaced him on the hill and
promptly forced :Russ Wendland to
hit an easy grounder to Steppon.
Bill grabbed the ball, tagged Mad-
Box Score

en and, threw to first for double
>lay, Hennerich tallied on Sampson's
tingle but Gould hela the home club
scoreless for the remainder of the
game.
The Wolverines will face North-
western tomorrow in the second game

Wolverine NeLt
Squad Leading
western Meet
Northwester Is Second;
flammnlett Is Vanquished
II Upset; Tb Wis
(Contilued from Page 1)
Playing his first match in 10 days,
Jim Porter was carried to three sets
before he finally downed Earl Crane
of Iowa 6-0, 4-6, 6-2 in the thirdt
division.
Wayne Stille also had a hard strug-f
gle on his hands in beating Bill Lip-
ton of Chicago. 6-3, 5-7, 6-1. In the
second set, "Dubre" had a 5-2 ad-
vantage over his steady opponent but 1
couldn't hold it. In the afternoon,
he and Porter teamed to beat Ed
Koehl and Bob Negendack of Wis-
consin 6-4, 5-7, 6-1. Again in the
second set, the Michigan duo was
leading 5-2, but couldn't hang on to
their advantage.-C
Tom Gamon's backeourt game was,
tco much for Dick Moore of Minne-
seta, and he won easily, 6:-3, 6-2.
In the; last singles battle, AldenI
Johnson ran his victory streak to
10 straight by downing Dick Cole
of Ohio State, 6-2, 4-0, 6-0, in a
match that was much closer than the
score indicates.

0 / e1e-seasoin Pessimism
* Michigan Baseball Year
By HAL WILSON
Daily Sports ELditor
MOSTLY ABOUT BASEBALL: When Coach Ray Fisher first looked
over his Wolverine baseball squad in the Field House batting cages lastl
winter, he didn't fall overboard on chances for a Big Ten title . . . nor
was this reticence just a manifestation of a coach's natural pessimism . . .
for no one knew better than Ray the rough spots of his squad, and the
problems that had to be overcome.
In the first placc. there was pitching, often said to be from 60 to 80
per cent of a team's relative strength . . Lyle Bond, the mound depart-
ment's leading carry-over from the previous season, was forced' to leave
school to undergo a serious operation . . . that left Ray with only one
veteran, Mickey Stoddard, from 1940's fifth place Conference outfit . :
and even Mickey had not had starting experience . for he gained most,
of his fame in a relief role.
Another sore spot was the third outfield berth . . for the left and
centerfield positions Ray had Don Holman and Davey Nelson. both of
whom had performed, creditably as sophomores the preceding season . . .

Micigan Ace
To Enter AAU
Meet At Ypst
Michigan's ace half-miler, sandy
haired Warren Breidenbach, decided
yesterday to enter the outdoor Michi-
gan AAU track meet, along with the
others of the Wolverine track squad
who are making the short jaunt
to Ypsilanti tomorrow.
Breidenbach, who holds the record
for having ruri the fastest half-mile
in Michigan's track history, plans to
compete in both the 880 and the
4quarter mile tomorrow. However, if
the weather turns out to be too warm,
the smooth-striding star miay concen-
trate on the sprints, running, M he
440 and the 220.
Late Entrant
Another late entrant who will carry
the Wolverine colors into the meet is
Gene Hirsch, sophomorp weight man.
Hirsch, who has consistently put the
shot 44 ft. in practice, will enter
the shot put and discus throw.
The Wolverines, who because of the
nearness of final exams are not enter-
ing a team in the meet, can be count-
ed on to dominate the field in the
events in which they are entered.
Capt.-elect Al Piel gave notice in prac-
tice this week that he will be ::unning
for keeps, when he turned in a 9.8
seccnds 100 yard dash, which was the
winning time run by Northwestern's
great Myron Piker in the :Big Ten
meet.
Canham, Allen Favored
Capt. Don Cannam and Wes Allen
are almost certain to place first and
second in the high jump and the
Wolverine javelin stars Perry :Kim-
ever and Johnny Wise are going along
to show their wares to the field in
this event. Frank McCarthy will
probably double in the high hurdles
and broad jump and Wilbert Wede-
noja is slated to compete in the pole
vault.

Northwestern AB
DeCorrevont, cf .. 5
Erdlitz, rf........4
McKuinon, ss .... 5
Hennerich, 2b .... 5
Madsen, 3b .......3
Wendland, lb .... 4
Sampson, if .... 4
Arnold, c.3
Moti, p..........2
Porth, p .. ....... 2

R
0
1
1
3
0
1
l
0
0
0

H
0
1
1
3
0
0
3
'1
0
0

Totals ......37 7 9

O
3
2
2
1
2
8
4
5
0.
0
27
0
2
1
4
0
3
8
2
7
0
0

A
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
1
0
Q
0
0
3
5
0
0
Q

E
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
E
1'
0
0
0
0
0)
3
01
1
0

Michigan AR
Nelson, of ...,.... 5
Holman, if....3
Steppon, 2b4..4
Wakefield, rf. 4
Chamberlain, 3b ..,5
Ruehle, lb.......3
Sofiak, ss........4
Harms, c.........5
Stoddard, p.......3
Gould, p1........1

R
2
1
21
2
2
0
0
0
0
0

H
2
1
'1
3
4
1
0
2
0
0

Totals .... 37 9 1327 9 5
Score By Innings
Michigan....... 202 400 010-9'
Northwestern 030 003 010-7
Runs batted in: Wakefield 4, Ruehle
2, Chamberlain 2, Steppon 1, Samp-
son 5, Arnold 1, Hennerich 1. Two
base hits: Sampson, Erdlitz, Cham-
berlain. Home runs: Wakefield 2,
Chamberlain. Left on bases: North-
western six, Michigan 8. Sacrifice
hits: Holman, Sofiak, Stoddard. Hits:
off Stoddard 7, in 7 innings; off
Gould 2 in 2; offnMotl, 9 in 4 in-
nings; off Porth, 4 in 5. Bases on
balls: off Motl, 3; off North, 3; off
Stoddard, 2; off Gould, 1. Struck
out: by Stoddard, 4; Gould, 2; by
Motl, 2; by Porth, 2. Winning pitch-
er, Stoddard. Losing pitcher, Motl.
Stolen bases: Nelson, Ruehle.
clouted his homer in the first in-
ning. As Dick walked to the
bench, ,Fisher loked at him reprov-
ingly.
"Listen, Dick," he said, "when they
get two strikes on you, stay in there
and swing. Don't choke your bat
like that."
The only sour note of the after-
noon came when Nelson scored on
Steppon's fly to left field in the first
inning. Pitcher Motl was covering
home and, after Davey had crossed
the plate, the husky hurler tagged
him none too gently in the face. There
were some heated words exchanged
between Fisher and several of the
Wildcat players but the incident was
soon forgotten. Nelson'-was pretty
badly dazed but he came out of it
in fine shape.
,.
L

BUD CHAMBERLAIN
of the series, which winds up the Big
Ten season for the Michigan team,
If the Wolverines win, they will auto-
matically become undisputed cham-
pions of the Western Conference for
the first time since 1936.
Iowa has the only team which can
touch Michigan in the Conference
race. If the Wolverines lose tomor-
row's game and the Hawkeyes win
their remaining four games, the two
teams will go into a tie for first place.
It is very unlikely though, from the
Iowans' past record, that they will
win the number of victories necessary
to give them a share of the title.
INDIANAPOLIS, May 29.-P)--
While most of this inland 2ity and -Its
influx of visitors yielded tonight to
carefree carnival, thirty-three race
drivers - all Americans -- sought
sleep and rest on the ave of their
perilous journey for $100,000 in prize
money in the Indianapolis Motor
Speedway's annual 500-mile test of
nerve, speed and endurance.-
Headed by Wilbur Shaw of Indian-
apclis, seeking his -fourth speedway
victory and his third in succession,
the field of cntranits will r~oar away
from the starting line at 10 a.m.
(CST) tomorrow.
Major Lea giwe
S 't #iii (hugOs

Waners Make
Last Stopover
I n Big Leag;ue
By BUD HENDEL
Baseball's most famous brother act
has been restored.
For when the Boston Braves signed
Paul Waner to a contract the other
day they brought together, for what
will probably be the last time in the
major leagues, the renowned outfield
duo of Paul and Lloyd Waner.
We're not forgetting that former
great pitching team of the St. Louis
Cardinals, Dizzy and Daffy Dean. Nor
are we overlooking that once potent
Boston Red Sox battery of Wes and
Rick Ferrel. But the test of time has
scored a jackpot homer in favor of the
Waners -- only they have survived
the diamond wars for over a decade -
only they can be called the greatest
of all time.
And now it seems as if the Waners
have reached the end of their dia-
mond days. Playing with the Hub
City's senior circuit entry, sport-
ing the strange Boston uniform, Big
and Little Poison, as the sports scribes
long ago dubbed them, are fading out
of the baseball picture.
Wins Batting Crown
But it wasn't alwas so. In 1926
the Pittsburgh Pirates went to the
Pacific Coast to bring a hard-hitting
young outfielder into the Buccaneer
fold, buying Paul Waner from the
San Francisco Seals.
After brother Paul had won the Na-
tional League batting crown in l'is
first year of big time competition
with a .386 average, he went to the
Pittsburgh front office and told them
that he had a younger brother play-
ing for San Francisco who was as
good or better than lie was. The
Pittsburgh management lost little
time in grabbing op the other half
of thle Waner combination, Lloyd
Lcd by the pot nt bats of indom-
inatable spiritof the Waners, te.
Steel City aggregation walked off
with the 1927 lonant. And until
last, year when frankie Frisch took
over the managerial reins of the
Corsairs, Big and Little Poison were
fixtures in the Pirate outfield.
But Frisch was seeking new blood,
young blood with which to make the
Pittsburgh entry a serious flag con-
tender. Age was creeping up on the
Waners. So this last winter :Frich
cut Paul loose and kept Lloyd around
as a pinch-hitter.
Paul Cast Adrift
The elder Waner caught on with
Brooklyn, but just a couple of weeks
ago he was cast adrift. He didn't fit
in with the youthful plans of the
Dodger administration. And when the
Bucs discovered a pressing need for
pitchers, they traded Lloyd to Bos-
ton about three weeks past for hurl-
er Nick Strincevich.
As brother Paul had opened the way
to the big leagues for Lloyd in 1927,
so Lloyd opened them for him not
so long ago. 9n his recommendation
the Braves put Paul's name to a
dotted line.
And now, no longer with their be-
loved Pirates, Paul and Lloyd Waner
are making a last ditch stand to stay
in the major leagues the last stand
of baseball's greatest brother act.
EMPLOYMENT
Some excellent positions are
open to the college graduate
through the office of the Na-

but the other spot was wide open.
ON THE WHOLE the outlook was a
none too bright at the begin-
ning of the season . . . most of the
experts emphasized that the Wol-
verines carried too many "ifs" to
rate as one of the outstanding con-
tenders for the crown . . .
It took but little timedfor the
Michigan squad to explode these
pre-season potentialities into base
hits, fine fielding and champion-
ship calibre hurling, however . . .
once they had swung into the Big
Ten pennant scramble they actu-
ally speeded up the torrid tempo
maintained in the Southlands . . .
and from that first Conference
series right up through yesterday's
Northwestern clash, Fisher's fight-
ing crew has never been headed.
THERE IS STILL a slight possi-
bility that Iowa may sweep its
final four games and tie the Maize
and Blue outfit if the Wolverines
drop today's season finale at Evan-
. . . but the chances of this hap-
pening are slimmer than a tooth-
pick on a diet . .. 1
Where then does the credit be-
long'for the Wolverines' first Con-
ference title since 1936? . . . for
the answer just turn over a couple <:

columns to the box score, and
glance at the names . . . add in
the all-important l and indispens-
ible coaching element . . . and
there stands the formula . . . it
was a team victory through and
through.
,PECIAL CREDIT can be given
to a great many of the Wolver-
ines . . . to George Harms, for in-
stance, who added a potent bat to
his achievements of last year, in
addition to handling Fisher's hurl-
ing,,staff with remarkable finesse
and to Bud Chamberlain for
his vast improvement over last'
season which has landed him right
at the top of Conference third- g
b.asemen.
George Ruehle could be singled
out for his steady first-basing . . .
and Mike Sofiak for his improvea
throwing arm and fiery spirit . . .
Nelson and Holman for their re-
liable hitting and fielding .
credit must go to Cant. Steppon
and the sophomore who replaced
him in the lineup when a foot in-
fection forced him out, Wayne
Christenson . . . Stoddard and re-
liefer Neil Muir both produced in
exceptional fashion on the mound.

flU T IT WILL be slighting no one to give an extra special boost to another
trio of Wolverines . . . first is the big, slugging sophomore, Dick
Wakefield, who has staged a one-man batting onslaught against Conference
pitching seldom equaled in Big Ten baseball history ...Art Hill has ex-
eelentiy described his feats of yesterday direct from Northwestern . . . and
those big league scouts weren't in the stands because they like the Evans-
ton variety of peanuts.
The second to whom a little extra. boost is fully deserved is another
sophomore, lanky Cliff Wise, who shoved his powerful frame into Fisher's
pitching gap and plugged it completely . . . big Cliff's right arm has been
a prime factor in Michigan's title drive . . . and no matter how he fares
at Evanston today the Whizzer's contribution to the team must be termed
invaluable.
rRHIR)D OUTSTANDING ASSET on this 1941 edition of the Maize and
Blue outfit is little Mase Gould . . a senior, Mase has ridden the
Wolverine bench for two years ... last season the diminutive southpaw
didn't even make the spring trip traveling squad . . that hurt . . . but
it, failed to dent his determination to become a leading moundsmnan for
Michigan . . . this winter Mase started early and worked hard . . . his
record now stands at five wins ... yesterday came his crowning achieve-
ient.. . . for the fighting little senior relieved Stoddard, silenced the mien-
acing Wildcat bats with a superlative job of relief hurling and protected the
lead which his slugging mates had built up.
The best way we can praise Ray Fisher's coaching is merely to refer to
all of th above . . . the way his veterans improved with another year of
his tut oring . . . the way his sophomore sensations blossomed forth into
charnum>ionship pertormers . . . the way his entire club kept a sustained drive
toward a single objective and succeeded, never slackening its pace for a
second . . . all stand as overwhelmingly impressive testimony of day'
ability s a coach . . . It has been a great Wolverine baseball year.

AREf YOU SICK
of"
Seavling Bt~ters
We invite you to come in
and see why we say
PARKER
65.9
Forever does away with
need for blotters.
11O11 T& ralisher
ANN ARDOR
205 5. Fourth Ave. Ph. 3955

1

AMERJICAN LEAGUE

'17: L
"Up

Cleveland ......
Chicago . .. .. .. .
New York ....... .
Detroit .,..... . .
Boston ..........
I'lliladelphia .
St. Louis
Washing ton ......

W
29
22
22
21
18
19
13
14

L
15
16
18
t20
18
21
24
26

Pet.
.659
.579t
.550
.512
.500
.475
.351
.350

GB
4
5
N7
8
121/2
1J3

' .. ... _

Thursday's Results:
Cleveland 9, Detroit 0.
New York 2, Washington 2 (called
at end of fifth, rain) ,
Boston 6, Philadelphia 4.
Chicago 4, St. Louis 0.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Y TRELAT
THE
H EAT
with as little courtesy as
you wish by defying it and
eating one of our "cool"
meals, which are designed
to make you enjpy eating
in hot weather.

ST P

f

1)]

:....... .,.a.. ,...w,,.,.,... . . ,x ,...,.n

mum~

EVERYONE enjoys the smoothness, the mellowness and

W
St. Louis ,,....... .30
Brooklyn .. . ..... 27
New York ........ 20
Cincinnati.... ...17
Chicago ... . ... . ..16
Pittsburgh.......13
Boston ........ ,. 12
Philadelphia . . . 10

L
9
12
14
22
20
20
22
26

Pet.
.769
.692
.588
.436
.444
.394
.353
.278

GB
3
71/%
13
12
14
151%2
18 2

6

I

the goodness of good BEER.

A tall, glass of BEER,

with its rich body and flavor will hit the spot on these
warm summer evenings.
This s the season most ideal for the enjoyment
of sparkling brew. For the best in BEER, summer-
time's favorite beverage, remember our delightful
Taproom.

Thursday's Results:
St. Louis 10, Cincinnati 9.
New York 9, Boston 2.
Only games scheduled.
MICHIGAN WEEKEND
IN SPORTS
TODAY

GOOD FOOD
is even better with
GOOD WINE

11

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