100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 28, 1941 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THRES

Nine

Beats

Ypsi, 5-4; Netters

Leave

For

Big

Ten

Meet

Errors Allow
Hurons To Get
Four Markers
Coach Fisher Tests Wise,
Gould, Stoddard, Muir
Before Wildcat Series
(Continued from Page 1)
Stoddard -worked Dennis for passes
and then pulled a double steal, but
they were left on base when Nelson
and Holman failed to hit.
When Normal came up in the last
of the fourth, something went amiss
in the Wolverine infield. Andy New-
lands, first up for the Hurons, was
safe when Ruehle missed his ground-
er. He advanced to third when Mike
Drusbacky, big Ypsi shortstop,
knocked a double to center off of
Stoddard, the second Varsity hurler.
After Joe Borovich had popped out
to Christenson, Chuck Oxley crossed
up the infield and worked-tlie squeeze
play bringing Newlands in for the first
run for Normal. Drusbacky went to
third on the play.
Double Steal Works
Then when Oxley tried to steal sec
ond, he was caught in a hot box.
While they were trying to run him
down, Drusbacky broke for home and
beat Sofiak's throw to the plate. Ox-
ley was safe at second. John Sha-
da, Normal second baseman, ground-
ed to Bud Chamberlain, who threw
him out at first. On the play Oxley
headed for third and Ruehle, tried to
pick him off, but his throw to third
was wild and Chuck came home.
Michigan came back and tied the
game up in the next frame when
Dick Wakefield hit a single to left
and Chamberlain got a hard hit to
right center to score Dick. Cham-
berlain was out at second trying to
stretch the hit into a double.
Nelson Gets Third Hit
The Woverines went into two-run
lead when they got a run in both th
seventh and eighth innings. In the
seventh Wakefield got a single, stole
second, went to third on a sacrifice
and scored on George Harm's long
fly!
Nelson hit his third single in the
eighth, but was replaced by Bill Cart-
mill because Davey's old leg injury
was bothering him agin. The
"Wheel" then scored when New-
lands, Huron center fielder, dropped
Wakefield's fly ball.
In the last of the eighth Ypsi
scored their last run on Cartmill's
two-base error, a fielder's choice and
a long fly. In the ninth Normal
threatened after two were out when
they got runners on second and
third, but Wise bore down and struck
out the last batter.
Northwestern Next
Michigan- failed to use many of
their scoring chances today as they
consistently got the first or second
man up in each inning on base but
couldn't get him around. They left
a total of 13 men on the base paths.
The ;Wolverine nine's next series
will be with Northwestern at Evans-
ton tomorrow and Friday. Michi-
gan needs only one win in this series
to clinch at least a tic for the Con-
ference championship, as they now
have a substantial lead over Iowa,
their closest rival.
Northwestern Next

SPORTFOLIO
T he California Brochure
* Bear-Wolverine Rivalry
By HAL WILSON
Daily Sports Editor
OUT OF THE GOLDEN WEST last week came an impressive blue and
white brochure expounding the mighty feats of the University of Calif-
ornia's touring baseball nine, which swept the State Intercollegiate associa-
tion before it left the Coast for a 30-game junket throughout the Midwest.
No Chamber of Commerce publicity job, this neatly bound volume,
nevertheless, equals anything that has ever come out of the Pacific Coast
praising oranges, movie stars, or California weather.
.And, furthermore, the California outfit backs up its ten-carat adjec-
tives with cold statistics. Before the Golden Bears. left on their Midwestern
?aunt, they swiped the marbles in 25 of the 30 games they played. During
the regular season, which began back in February while the rest of the
baseball world was still warming its feet in the Hot Stove League, the Calif-
ornia powerhouse tied with St. Mary's in the standings at 11 victories and
four defeats. But in a three-game playoff series, the Berkeley outfit
snagged two games to cop its seventh title since 1930.
Thus far on its quest into the interior for more laurels the Bears have
been highly successful. Last week they shut out Minnesota's Gophers, 2-0.
Included on their itinerary is a two-game series with Coach Ray Fisher's
Big Ten Conference-bound Wolverines, June 4 and 5, a week from today
and tomorrow at Ferry Field.
Ace backstop of the high-riding Bears is 194-pound Carl Hoberg, who
has had contact with Michigan athletes before. It was last September
and the husky Californian, who was holding down a berth on the Bears
football team, still smarts under the 41-0 drubbing administered by Fritz
Crisler's grid machine.

_

CALIFORNIA FANS can point,
however, to last Saturday's
track victory over Michigan's two-
mile relay quartet in the Los An-
geles Coliseum Relays. Thus, this
third meeting of BeartWolverine
athletic representatives will serve
as a sort of playoff test to deter-
mine 1940-41 sports supremacy.
Clint Evans, California coach,
has sent a great many of his pro-
teges up to the big time during his
tenure as Bear baseball mentor.
Perhaps the greatest of these was
Orvie Overall, who hurled for the
world's champion Chicago Cubs

during the fabulous Tinker-to-
Evers-to-Chance regime. Regarded
as one of the sport's all-time
greats, Overall graduated from
California in 1904. Latest of Ev-
ans' pupils to' make a place for
himself in the Majors is Sam
Chapman, who patrols the out-
field for Connie Mack's Philadel-
phia Athletics.
Chapman, who also received
All-America football honors in his
undergraduate days, was a promi-
nent member of the touring Calif-
ornia nine which lost an 8-6 de-
cision to the Wolverines back in
1938.

Weirmen Seek
Wildcat's Title
In Windy City
Capt. Tobin Ends Career
In Conference Matches;
Jin Porter To Compete
By DICK SIMON
Michigan's tennis team departs at
noon today for Chicago and the West-
ern Conference tennis championships
which will be held on the University
of Chicago courts tomorrow, Friday
and Saturday.
Coach Leroy Weir is taking along a
seven-man squad consisting of Cap-
tain Jim Tobin, Lawton Hammett
Jim Porter - whose injured foot ha
healed sufficiently enough to allow
him to play - Wayne Stille, Ton
Gamon, Alden Johnson, and Gerr3
Schaflander.
Wildcats Defending Champs
The first six will play singles ir
that order, and in doubles Tobin anc
Hammett will play number one, Por-
ter and Stille number two, and Gain.
on and Schaflander number three.
Last year Northwestern won th
title with a total of 20 points, Chi-
cago was second with 15, Ohio Stat
third with 8, and Michigan finishe
in fouth place with 6 points.
The situation before the meet thi
year, however, is much different
In dual meet competition with Bi
Ten teams, the Wolverines have ye
to be beaten. Northwestern ha
dropped two matches - one to Mich
igan and one to Ohio State - whie
the Buckeye have lost only to the
Wolverines.
Seymour Greenberg, Wildcat num
ber one man, will be back to defen(
his singles crown. The little south
paw, 19th ranking amateur in the
nation, has yet to lose a match in
Big Ten competition.
Tobin Will End Career
On the other hand, whoever win
the first bracket championship wil
have had a tough fight on his hands
Cal Sawyier, Chicago number on
man, won the third division crowi
last year, and has shown much im
provement during this season. Also i
the first division play-offs will b
Sherwood Gorenstein, Wisconsin firs
singles player, who won the secon
division title in last year's matches.
Tobin, finishing his tennis career a
a Michigan player, has been playing
brilliant tennis in recent matches anc
should be up there giving Greenberg
Sawyier and Gorenstem - the only
Conference men to beat him thi
year - a lot of trouble.
Sig Eps, Dekes Go
Into Softball Finak
In one of the wildest games eve
seen at South Ferry Field, Sigm
Phi Epsilon yesterday nosed out
stubborn Pi Lambda Phi team 14-11
and gained one of the places in th
finals of the fraternity league. Three
errors by Pi Lamb and a dispute
homerun by Doug Gould of the Si
Eps in the sixth inning gave th
winners eight runs and a victory
Jimmy Glick, Pi Lamb, led the hitter
with a double, triple and homer.
The Delta Kappa Epsilon hous
also gained the fraternity finals b
virtue of a 12-4 win over Delta Ta
Delta in the semi-final round. Ra
Dwyer held the losers to five hit
and struck out 12.
The dormitory Staff nveneci thei:
series against, Williams House with
a 24-9 trouncing. They will pla3
again Monday to decide the winne
of the series.
- - -

ACCORDING TO THt PROSPECTUS, Evans "likes to take each genera-
tion of baseball players on some sort of a trip." And, in Evans' opinion,
"some sort of a trip" evidently means a real journey, for the Bears traveled
to Japan in 1921, 1927, and 1929, to Honolulu in 1926, and to Mexico in 1932,
in addition to their 1920 and 1938 treks east.
Sport shorts included in the brochure tell of the record of the Bears'
leading pitcher, lean Mike Koll, who has been the leading hurler in the'
conference for two years. A southpaw, he won 10 while dropping only one
in the regular season just concluded.
Other shorts describe California's home playing grounds, Edwards
Field, "the best collegiate baseball plant on the Coast." With a seating
capacity of 6,000, the stadium provides plenty of space for the outfielders to
romp around in. Distances are 600 feet to centerfield. 330 feet to the
rightfield wall, and 530 feet to left.
Most pleasing victory of this season from a California standpoint was
the 10-9 defeat the Bears handed the professional Oakland club of the
Pacific Coast League. The hard-hitting collegians measured four Oakland
moundsmen for 13 hits to win the bitterly-fought tilt.
* * * *
Lyle Bond, Wolverine hurler of last year and regarded as Michigan's
number one pitcher until he was hospitalized during the winter, may get the
opportunity to watch the Maize and Blue-California series next week. Still
laid up in Northfield Sanitarium, the willowy right-hander is hoping to be
able to watch the battle and is pulling hard for the Wolverines in their
crucial two-game series with Northwestern at Evanston tomorrow and
Friday.

E
s
Y
r
s
v
t
Y
1
E
E
d
s
t
s
e
e
d
e
a
II
2
I't

i

Senior MClub
Members Win
Blanket A ward
Forty-three members of the M
Club were presented with blanket
awards by Head Football Coach1
Fritz Crisler at a banquet last nightI
in the Union.
The awards were given to those
senior members of the M Club who,
haveearned at least two varsity let-
ters. Those athletes who earned the
blankets are Wes Allen, Charles Bar-
ker, Bob Barnard, Ed Barrett, Bill
Beebe, WarrenBreidenbach,CHerb
Brogan, Don Canham, Bill Combs,'
Ed Czak Fred Dannenfelser, John
Dobson, Howard Egert, Forest Eva-
shevski.
Other seniors who gained the award
are Ralph Fritz, Ed Frutig, Joseph
Glasser, Geoffrey Hall, Tom Har-
mon, Fred Heddle, Francis Heydt,
Bill Holmes, Bob Hook, Paul Kromer,
John Kutsche, Tom Lawton, Jack
Leutritz, James Lovett, John Paup,
Charles Ross, George Ruehle.
The list continues with Gilbert
Samuelson, Mike Sofiak, Bill Step-
Pon, Maynard Stoddard, Richard
Stodden. Milo Sukup, Joseph Thaxter,
Jim Tobin, Tom Weidig, Jim Welsh,
Karl Wisner and Jack Wolin.
Numerically, track heads the list
with 13 cindermen represented. Only
two men, Forest Evashevski and
Mike Sofiak, earned as many as six
Varsity letters during their Michi-
gan careers. Mike won his M's in
baseball and basketball, while Forest
starred in football and basebat.
Tigers Win Again
On Canpbell's Hits
CLEVELAND, May 27.-(P)-Bruce
Campbell beat Cleveland for the sec-
ond straight time by lining two hom-
ers in Detroit's 9 to 6 victory today.
Outfielder Campbell, who defeated
his ex-mates yesterday with a two-
run double, produced a homer good
for three of the five tallies in a sev-
enth-inning Tiger rally and the In-
dians never caught up. Also clout-
ing for the circuit were Schoolboy
Rowe, the winning flinger, and Cleve-
land's Ken Keltner and Ray Mack.
Rowe was relieved by Johnny Gor-
sica in the seventh inning, but re-
ceived credit for the victory.
'ITe biggest littlef
Radio vaue ever sod
RCA preferred tubes

Big powerful
table radio
Excellent tone.
The foreign corres-
pondent 7-tube
performance.
5-tu be econIomy.
Free
leather,
carrying
case
26.54 value
$20.00
complete

Frosh Trackmen Show Promise
Of Being Future Point-Getters

By ERIC ZALENSKI [
Great oaks from little acorns grow.
And so from the unheralded crop of
freshman thinclads developed by
Coach Chester A. Stackhouse during'
the 1940-41 season will come the
Michigan varsity track stars of future
years.
Coach Stackhouse will turn over a
frosh squad of 25 numeral winners to
Varsity Mentor Ken Doherty, includ-
ing a dozen outstanding prospects
in both track and field events.
Heading the list of track aces is the
speedy Detroiter, Len Alkon, who has
been clocked in 9.9 seconds for the
100 and 21.5 seconds for the 220-yard
dash. Alkon is regarded as a great
prospect, only a few degrees removed
from the crack varsity sprint trio
of, Captain-elect Bud Piel, Al Thomas
and Bob Ufer.
Quarter and half Prospects
In the quarter and half-mile, Coach
Stackhouse has four men who can be,
counted on for great varsity perform-
ances, The quartet includes John Rox-
borough, Warren Hart, Jim Sears and
John Ingersoll. Three of the runners
have already cracked two minutesin
the 880-yard run and all four have
bettered 51 seconds in the gruelling
quarter-mile dash.
Perhaps the most likely or the
freshman prospects is Ernie Leonardi,
who runs the mile and the two-mile
races equally well. Leonardi has cov-
ered the mile in 4:27.2 and the two-
mile in 9:41, something no freshman
has done since the days of Ralph
Schwarzkopf. Not far behind Leonardi
in both the long distances are Roland
Thornton and Arnett Tait. The for-
mer has run a mile-in a shade over
4:30 and the two-mile in 9:51.
Pinney Good Hurler
Last of the sprint stars is Chuck
Pinney, who has twice equalled the
freshman record of 24.2 seconds in the
220-yard low hurdles.
Heading the stars in the field events

Major L
AMERICAN LEAGUE

is Pete Wege; the greatest javelin
thrower in Michigan history. Wege,
who cracked Phil Northrup's 17-year-
old record earlier in the season, broke
his own record of 191 feet, 3 inches
this week with a heave of 196 feet,
six inches. In the broad jump, there
is Roosevelt Stiger who with very little
practice has leaped 22 feet, eight and
one-quarter inches.
Weak In Pole Vault
Although there are ..no great frosh
prospects in the pole vault and the
high jump, there may be excellent
Varsity material in the shot put and
discus among the four consistent per-
formers, Merv Pregulman, Chuck
Kennedy, Chuck Haslam and Walt
Lindstrom.
Nine other trackmen who may de-
velop into point-getters for the tWol
verines are Allan Mactier, Johnny
McCarty, Herb Collins, Bob Urbanek,
Jim Davidson, Henry Schmidt, George
Brown, Joe Leahy and Paul Massey.
I-M Department Names
New Sports Managers
Intramural managers for the 1941-
42 athletic season were announced
yesterday by Earl N. Riskey, Assistant
Director of Intramural Sports. Taking
over the positions of senior managers
are Bob Krause and Bill Carruthers,
who succeed Gene Gribbroek and
Chuck Esler.
New junior managers are Don Mal
ton, Fred Gipson, Frank Hanauer;
and Mel Silver. John Allen and Lew
Cohen are the new additions to the
Sports Building's sophomore staff.
The new managers will assume their
duties with the opening of next year's
fall athletic season.

league Standings
F NATIONAL LEAGUE

Michigan AR R,
Nelson, cf........5 . 1
Cartmill, cf . .....0 1
Holman, if ......1 0
Christenson, 2b . 4 0
Wakefield, rf' .... 5 2
Chamberlain, 3b . 4 0
Ruehle, lb ........2 1
Sofiak, ss ........2 0
Harms, c.........4 0
Gould, p ......... 0 0
Stoddard, p...... 0 0
Muir, p.......... 1 0
Wise, p.......... 1 0

H
3
0
0
1
2
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0

4
4
0
1
4
3
0
6
0
7
0
0
1
1

A
0
0f
0
0f
0
w2
0
1
0
2
2
0
1

E
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0

Cleveland.......
Chicago .......
New York ......
Detroit........
Boston ........
Philadelphia
Washington ...
St. Louis .......

W
28
21
21
20
17
18
14
12

L
14
15
18
19
17
20
25
23

Pet.
.668
.583
.538
.513
.500
.474
.359
.343

GB
4
51!2
61/2
7
8
12%/
12% /

St. Louis......
Brooklyn ......
New York . .... .
Chicago ........
Cincinnati.....
Pittsburgh....
Boston ........
Philadelphia

W
27
26
18
16
17
12
12
10

L
9
12
14
18
20
20
20
25

Pet.
.750
.684
.563
.471
.459
.375
.375
.286

GB
2
7
10
10'%2
13
13
161/

*}
rytr
Suits an Spr ot
SUITS REUCED
'2. c ~/Q arI t' ore
0-5
Vriees to $o3 20
s,
Se tW rto
TU oD SUITS
5.1ztC sleeveless
VAS /9 AAi .w

_
x -'
,
,;
x ,.
' ''
ti
1
5
. is
4
. tt
f
1
t
f
i
F , .
e y
r
a
-'
i
. ;;i
'
a.a
" nr
rr.
i
i
,.
c,:;
'.
.'
s5
k
S a!
i':
,,..':

Tuesday's Results
Detroit 9, Cleveland 6
St. Louis 5, Chicago 2
New York 10, Washington 8
Boston 5-1, Philadelphia 2-11

Tuesday's Results
Brooklyn 6, Philadelphia 0
Boston at New York (night)
Chicago at St. Louis (night)
Only Games Scheduled

Totals ........29 5 9 27 7 3I

Mich. Normal AB
Siera, rf ........ 4
Newlands, f ... 5
Drusbacky, ss .... 4
Borovich, lb...... 3
Oxley, If ....... 4
Shada, 2b........ 4
Lamiman, c..... 3
Grady, 3b ........2
Dennis, p........ 3
Nemith, x .......1
Woisicki, xx ......1
..Totals 34.

R
0
1
2
0
1
0,
0
0
p
0

H
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
0

0
0
1
4
13
1
3
4
1
0
0
0

A
0
1
3
0
0
2
0
2
0

E
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0,

Relax.
in clothvs
likc these -
We won't go into the usefulness of
these popular Ensembles - every-".:
body knows you can wear them for
everything - from golf to bridge.
But we do want to point out that
they possess all the smart tailoring
details of only the better garments
and are priced reasonably from
$4.95 to $7.95.

Vacation
Clothes
FOR EVERY NEED

.4. .6.27.16. .1

Coopers Sox

4 pair $1.001

Michigan ... 100 110
Normal ....000 300

110-5
010--4

Sport Shirts $1.00 to $2.00
Wash Slacks $1.65 to $2.95

Two base hits: Drusbacky, Dennis,
Lamiman. Home runs: Ruehle. Sac-
rifice hits: Holman 3, Chamberlain,
Sofiak. Stolen Bases: Christenson,
Ruehle, Sofiak 2, Stoddard, Drus-
backy, Oxley. Left on Bases: Michi-

Gabardine

Slacks
$5.95

to $6.95

Ensembles $3.95 to $9.50

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan