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May 16, 1941 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

=PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY 16, 1941

- ~
I

Serles To Talk
At Pharmacy
Meet Tuesday
Illinois Dean Will Discuss
Problems Of Guidance
For Entering Students
Dr. E. R. Serles, Dean of the Uni-
versity of Illinois College of Pharm-
acy, will be the main speaker at the
Tenth Annual Pharmaceutical Con-
ference which will be held Tuesday
in the Rackham Amphitheatre.
Dr. Serles will address the group
on "The Problem of Vocational Gui-
dance for High School Students and
Pharmacists Entering Our College of
Pharmacy."
From 1923 to 1940 Dr. Serles was
dean of the Division of Pharmacy
of the University of South Dakota
until transferring to the University of
Illinois last September.
The second speaker of the after-
noon session will be Waldo M. Bow-
man of Toledo, who will speak on
"The Pharmacist and His Commun-
ity." Bowman's topic will be discussed
by Arthur Crippen of the University
Extension Service. -
The conference, held annually by
the College of Pharmacy, in coopera-
tion with the Michigan Branch of
the American Association, will open
at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday.
(Advertisement)
LATE NEWS OF RECORDS
By DORIS PRICE
Perhaps you would be interested
in knowing which of the May Fes-
tival numbers proved most pdpular
with the record buying public, as
reflected by our sales.
Beethoven's Symphony No. 7,
played by the New York Philhar-
monic underP
Toscanini, took
an early.lead
which was not
seriously threa-
tened until the
Sibelius Sym-
phony No. 1 was
played on Sat-
urday. Then,w
following the4
afternoon con- s
cert, an over- .
whelming de-.
mand for the DORIS PRICE
Sibelius First swept to a record
only two short of that set by Bee-
thoven's Seventh.
Neither the Sibelius Seventh nor
the Violin Concerto showed a sub-
stantial increase over normal sales.
Third place was taken by Liszt's
Piano Concerto No. 1; the Giese-
king recording was in greatest de-
mand, followed closely by the Le-
vitzki recording; the slightly long-
er interpretation of Emil Sauer
sold just two copies.
Among those who helped to put
Don Quixote in fourth place were
two members of the Philadelphia
Orchestra, who sent copies to their
friends. The fact that the Victor
recording was done by their or-
chestra conducted by Ormandy no

doubt gave it special significance
for them.
Fifth place was taken by the
recording of the Fire Bird done by
the Philadelphia Orchestra con-
ducted by Stokowski. Out-of-town
visitors accounted for most of
these sales; a great many of our
regular.customers already own the
Fire Bird.
Among single records, there was
a very active demand for many of
the numerous recordings of Lawr-
ence Tibbett, made when he was
perhaps in better voice than at.
present, and for the regrettably'
few but superlative recordings of
Dorothy Maynor. Needless to say,
the encore playing of the Emperor
Waltz not only stimulated the sale
of the several recordings of that
particular waltz, but also gave
great impetus to the two delightful
albums of Strauss waltzes played
by the Boston Pops Orchestra un-
der Fiedler and'the Minneapolis
Orchestra under Ormandy.
Among popular records, the fol-
lowing are most frequently reques-
ted: Intermezzo, played by Good-
man; The Things 1 Love, Jimmy
Dorsey; Maria Elena, Jimmy Dor-
sey; My Sister and I, Jimmy Dor-
sey; Let's Get Away from It All,
Tommy Dorsey; Music Makers,
Harry James; I Understand, Jim-
my Dorsey; The Spirit is Willing,
Glenn Miller; and Everything
Happens to Me, Tommy Dorsey.
Just arrived: the new Tommy
nnrse' twelre inch recording of

Det

roit Voter Increase Causes
Rise Of Democratic Strength

By GEORGE W. SALLADE
An increase in voting participation
has always meant an increase in the
Democratic party strength in Detroit
election, Dr. Edward H. Litchfield
concludes in the Bureau of Govern-
ment publication, "Voting Behavior
In A Metropolitan Area," released
yesterday.
Dr. Litchfield, of the :Brown Uni-
versity political science department,
points out that affiliation with the
Democratic party was highest during
presidential elections, and at the end
of the decade the city showed more
Democratic voters than at the begin-
ning.
The Polish middle class was the
most Democratic and the wealthy na-
tive whites the most Republican. The
most radical change was noted in the
Negro community vote. In 1930 it was
the least Democratic and now it is
close to the most Democratic.
Vote Remains Same
The Detroit electorate supported
"Michigan's Little New Deal" to about
the same extent in 1938 as it did in
1936. Third party voting, Dr. Litch-
field emphasizes, has not played a sig-
nificant role in Detroit's political life.
It has fallen off during the past eight
years, occasionally as much as 50 per
cent from one election to another.
Dr. Litchfield admits, after making
a study of the voting behavior in De-
troit over the past ten years, that
there are strong group interests. How-I
ever, these group opinions are neither
rigid nor conscious.
Negro Vote Slight
Negro voting in elections has been
below the average for the whole city
during most of the period studied
although it has maintained a con-
tinued increase while the city record

has fluctuated. Foreign born partici-
pation closely resembles that of the
city, Dr. Litchfield explains, but the
Russian group has maintained the
highest average.
This indicates the income influence
on voting, Dr. Litchfield writes. Those
in the higher income groups take
more advantage of their suffrage
rights than those in the lower brack-
ets.
A An Ar borI

ROTC To Give
Review cToday
Ceremony Is To Honor
Committee Members
Members of the faculty advisory
committee to the military and naval
science departments will be honored
at the review of the University ROTC
at 5 p.m. today at Palmer Field.
Col. A. H. Lovell, chairman of the
group and assistant dean of the Col-
lege of Engineering, will be accom-
panied by the other members of the
committee, Prof. Louis I. Bredvold,
Prof. Philip E. :Bursley, Prof. Fred-
erick A. Coller, Prof. Joseph R. Hay-
den, Prof. Elmore S. Pettyjohn, Prof.
Benjamin W. Wheeler, Prof. Alfred
H. White and Prof. John S. Worley.
All cadets are advised that if the
flag opposite the Library is still flying
at 4:30 p.m. the ceremony has been
postponed.
Faculty members, students and
townspeople are invited to attend.
Music will be furnished by the ROTC
drum and bugle corps.

LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St., Phone 3916. 10c
WANTED TO BUY-4

CLASFIEDADVETISING]

TYPING

TYPING-Experienced.

Miss Allen,

408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14C
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327l. 706 Oakland.

ASU Sponsors
Strategy Talk
World War To Be Subject
Of Yakhantoff Lecture
Gen. Victor A. Yakhontoff, retired
officer of the former Russian Im-
perial Army, will speak on the "Strat-
egy of the World War" in a lecture
sponsored by the American Student
Union at 4 p.m. today in Unity Hall,
at the corner of State and Huron
streets.
An analysis of the policies of the
major nations, England, Germany,
Japan, the Soviet Union 'and the
United States will be given by the
General, a recognized authority on
Far Eastern affairs. General Yakhon-
toff has spent most of his time since
the first World War in the Far East
studying China, Japan and Russia
and has written four books about
those countries.

i
r

FOR SALE
THOROUGHBRED English Setter
puppies, registered. Good hunting
strain. 3005 Plymouth Road. Ph.
5132. 366

Here Is Today's
In Summary

News

Otto W. Haisley, superintendent
of the city schools for the past 17
years has been dismissed from his
office by the board of education amid
off-the-record charges that he was
using "ultra modern" methods and
neglecting the three "R's" of educa-
tion in Ann Arbor schools.
Well liked by teachers, parents and
taxpayers, Haisley's 5 to 4 dismissal
vote was greeted by boos from the
audience, and a spontaneous protest
group is forming to arouse publicf
opinion against the board's action.
Under the terms of Haisley's con-
tract, he will continue in office until
September 1, and may appeal to the
State Tenure Board for reinstatement,
since the unanimous vote of the local
board is required for dismissal with.;
out right of appeal.
A person high in education circles,
in Ann Arbor said that the charges
were trumped up and there was no
real basis for the board's action.
* * *

'AIew s
of Mie
dorms

PA

By GLORIA NISION
and ROBERT MANTHO ]
Stockwell :hall held a tea from
3:00 to 5:30 pan. Wednesday.
On the same day Betsy Barbour
held its house elections. The new
officers are Betty Braugham, '42,
president; Mary Elliot hlaperkamp,
42, vice-president; Mary Jaworski,
'43, social chairman; and Dorothy
Anderson, '42, assembly representa-
tive. Miss Anderson was re-elected
to her position.
Jordan Halls Art Exhibit, which
was planned for the pleasure of par-
ents on Mother's Day, was kept up
this week for the benefit of the girls.
Included are eight prints which are
the beginning of a collection for a
lending library in the dorm, and sev-
eral art works by the residents of the
house.
The new student advisors for
next year were honored Monday in
hearing Dr. Harrid O'Shea, pro-
fessor of psychology at Purdue Uni-,
versity, speak on how to assist
freshmen in a psychological way.
A special dinner was held for her
before she spoke at which were
present 15 faculty members and the
upperclass women assistants of the
past year as well as the new ones.
Rain and roses are this week's
bright spotlight events as far as the
dorms are concerned . . . Ann Arbor
clouds are supplying all the raindrops
and the East and West Quads the
posies. Adams House of the West
Quad even gave the fathers flowers
during their Mothers Day Tea from
3:30 to 5 p.m. last week. Pop rated
daisies and mother received a cor-
sage.

CASH for used clothing; men and1
ladies. Claude H. Brown, 512 S.
Main St. Phone 2-2736. 31c
WANTED - ANY OLD OR NEW;
CLOTHING, PAY FROM $5.00 to
$500 FOR SUITS, OVERCOATS.
TYPEWRITERS, FURS - PER-
_SIANS, MINKS. PHONE ANN AR-
BOR 6304 for APPOINTMENTS.
SAM.
FOR RENT
ROOMS to rent for fall and sum-
mer. Approved house. Call 8726.
371
UNUSUALLY NICE 3 or 4 room, fur-
nished. Private bath. Heat and
hot water. 1327 S. State. 382
FOR RENT-Several rooms for men
students for summer school. Three!
minute walk from campus. Continu-
ous hot water, shower and excel-
lent beds. Congenial atmosphere.
Rates, $2.50 per week. Mrs. Harry
Mahey, 413 Thompson St. 3861
ONE DOUBLE and one single room
for men during the summer session.
Approved house near campus.
Rates reasonable. Call 8726 or in-
. quire 535 Walnut Street. 387
ATTRACTIVELY FURNISHED two-
room apartment-3-way ventila-
tion-Private bath7-shower. Re-
frigeration. One adult. 602 Mon-
roe. 365
TRANSPORTATION
H. B. GODFREY
MOVING - STORAGE - PACKING
! Local and Long Distance Moving.
410 N. Fourth Ave. Phone 6297
29c
RHEAD'S HOUSEHOLD PACKING
CO.-Let us move, pack, or ship
you to any point. Experienced
movers. Special rates for students'
storage. Dial 3515. 318 N. First'
St. 32c
SITUATIONS WANTED -2
SITUATION WANTED-Experienced
couple for fraternity cook and por-
ter. First class local reference.
Phone 6764. 350
EXPERIENCED COOK with good
references would like position in
fraternity for fall. Write Box No.
1, Michigan Daily.
LOST and FOUND
LOST - Female Dalmatian coach
dog. Answers to name of "Lady."

Week Days 2-4-7-9 P.M.
Today & Saturday !

VA

MISCELLANEOUS
SUMMER SCHOOL STUDENTS,
whether they are flat, round, or
square headed, for that "Person-
ality Haircut" or "Crew-cut" come
to our popular collegiate 7-chair
barber shop.hFree blotters and
campus pamphlets at the Dascola
Barbers. Between State and the
Michigan Theatre. 385
PAINTING, Decorating, Paper Hang-
er. Blending and stippling. Work
samples shown. Phone 2-2943. 363
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. 19c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 5c
WISE Real Estate Dealers: Run
listings of your vacant houses in
The Daily. Dial 23-24-1 for spe-
cial rates. 353

I

- Coming Sunday -
Come and
laugh like Y
the devil
with-

.1

I

Extra

Pete Smith's "Wedding Bills"
"Information Please"
"TOY TROUBLE", Cartoon
PARAMOUNT NEWS
MARCH OF TIME
"Crisis In The Atlantic"

PAJ AMAS
MAY SALE
Smartest Hosiery Shoppe
Michigan Theatre Bldg.

wih ROBERT CUMMINGS
CHARLES COBURN
EDIAUND GINENN

Reward. Call 2-3762.

384

I

I

0

j

6

L

$UMMER

$ANG

a

at

MARSHALL'S

Larg Siz

Camay
SOAP
4 for 19c

HAVE YOUR EVENING
SNACK DELIVERED!
Sandwiches - Ice Cream
Malted Milks
FREE DELIVERY!
on any order over soc
Call 5933
Service Until Midnight

Large Size
DREFT
21C

Electric
TOASTER
69c

Pennsylvania
TENNIS BALLS
3 for $1.09
Reg $1.50 Enameled
ALARM CLOCKS
98c

Well

Known Anywhere

500 Feather Soft
FACIAL TISSUES
ill19C

Friday's Fountain Special
Fresh Strawberry

Sundae

12c

IN BROWN BOTTLESj

The world-wide demand for Schlitz is a
fitting tribute to this magnificent beer. Its
absolute uniformity and supreme quality
have made it the unchallenged choice of
lovers of fine beer the world over. Until
_... r.- e ll ..- H ma a, rnaa hy

All Popular Brand CIGARETTES
2 for 25c -$1.19 carton

/i W . a 1 tr..-r - ' - - I .

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