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May 15, 1941 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THURSDAY, MAY 15, 1941

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE -

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PAGE FIVE

SPEE Meeting
To Be Openedf
He June 23
Science And Technology
In Engineering Courses
Will Be General Topics
Science and technology in the en-
gineering courses of American col
lgees and universities will be the gen-
era1 topic. of discussion in the forty-
ninth annual Mpeeting of the Society
for the Promotion of Engineering
Education to be held June '23-27 on
the University campus.
Outstanding educators in the field
of engineering from every part of
the United States will highlight the
preliminary program for the meet-
ing, more than 2,000 engineering
teachers from the 'nation's leading
education institutions being expected
here at that time.
Extensive preparations for the pro-
gram entertainment and housing are
being made by the local committe
headed by Prof. E. L. Eriksen of the
engineering mechanics department,
with fifty other faculty men assisting
in the plans.
In addition to the general sessions
featuring addresses by engineers'from
universities and industries, the meet-
ing will also offer conferences on
specific problems in engineering ed-
ucation, as well as inspection trips
to nearby industrial plants and lab-
oratoiies.
Among the speakers who will ad-
rdess the meeting are President Alex-
ander G. Ruthven, Dr. D. B. Prentice,
president of Rose Polytechnic Insti-
tute and president of the SPEE; R. A.
Seaton, director of engineering de-
fense training for the Unitd States
Office of Education; 'James W. Park-
er, vice-president aad chief engineer
of Detroit Edison; Dean A. A. Potter
of Purdue University, and Prof. R. A.
Dodge of the engineering mechanics
department.
Price To Play
Foreign Music
Carillonneur Will Feature
International Program
Music featured on today's carillon
program by Prof. Percival Price, of
the School of Music, at 7:15 p.m. will
be international in character.
The French impressionist spirit will
be represented by Claude Debussy's
"The Sunken Cathedral." This com-
position which paints in music a cath-
edral being submerged in the sea,
tolling all the while a majestic chant,
is especially suited for the carillon.
"Awake Sweet Fay," and "In Silent
Night," the first two selections in the'
aerman folk song group, are treated in
the manner of the art song. German
and English students used to sing
in happier days "Upidee," and "Hap-
py Is a Gypsy's Life," which will be
third and fifth songs in this group.
The fourth piece will be "True Love,"
which the young Werther heard on
the carillon.
A Chinese air, called "The Flute,"
is also to be played.
DRAFT INFORMATION
All students who desire informa-
tion concerning the Selective Serv-
ice Act, their status under it, ob-
taining of deferment and post-
ponement and similar matters are
invited to address their questions
to the Selective Service Depart-
ment, The Michigan Daily. A
member of the staff, in collabora-

tion with Prof. Louis A. Hopkins,
will attempt to answer all perti-
nent questions in the columns of
'he Daily.

Band

Leader

And Actress Wed

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ore o 'resent Cooley Cane '
At Tong Oil BanquetMay_211

Old Man Tradition will stick an-
other feather in his cap Wednesday,
May 21, when Sigma Rho Tau, engi-
neering speech society, will present
its most outstanding junior with the
famed Coley Cane during the annual
Tung Oil Banquet at the Union.
Named for Dean Emeritus Morti-
mer E. Cooley, the cane is one of two
left in existence, the whereabouts of
the other being unknown.
Once part of a fence around the
':ampus to keep neighboring cows off
the grass, the Cooley Canes took on
new significance one night when a
band of pranksters tore up the fence.
carrying the pickets into Dean Coo-
ley's class the next day, where they
were dubbed "Cooley Canes" by the
students.
Tung Oil Crown Given
Evidently effecting a mass confis-
cation, Dean Cooley used the pickets
as canes for a good many years. InI
the past he has been present for the
presentation ceremony, but it is
doubtful that he will be able to be
on hand this'year.
In addition to this award, another
equally as important will be the pre-
sentation of the Tung Oil Crown to
the faculty member who makes the
best impromptu speech for the occa-

sion. Last year's winner, Prof. A. D.
Moore, of the electrical engineering
department, will confer the honor.
Featured speaker at the banquetF
will be James W. Parker, vice-presi-
dent and chief engineer of Detroit
Edison, who will speak on some topic
of engineering interest. A member
of most of the professional engineer-
ing societies, Parker is very promi-
nent in the field of engineering.
The installation of new officers
will complete the festivity for the
evening. Norman Taylor, '42E, will
remain in the president's chair,
while other officers-elect will be
Alexander Pentland, '42E, vice-presi-
dent; Marvin Zeskina, '43E, home
secretary; Edward Rutan, '43E, cor-
responding secretary; 'Charles Cole,
'43E, recording secretary, and John
Hammelef, '42, treasurer.
Artificial Voice
Will Perform
At Exhibition
"Pedro the Voder," the machine

Band Concert
Tq Be Given
Here May 2
The Twenty-seventh Annual Spring
Concert of the University of Michi-
gan Band will be given at 8:30 p.m.,
May 27, in Hill Auditorium, it was
announced yesterday by Stuart Park,
'42, publicity director for the band.
Soloist for, the concert, which is
the high spot of the band's activities
during the year, will be Lucille Ben-
nett, violinist, who will play "Cu-
bana," a violin solo with band ac-
companiment.
The composition was written by
Miss Bennett's father, David Ben-
nett, who is an outstanding com-
poser of band music in this country.
The first half of the program, ac-
cording to Park, will be devoted en-
tirely to Wagner's works while the
music of the second half will be
contemporary.

Dean Russell Bunting of the
School of Dentistry will attend the
ann-al National Nutritional Con-
erenee which will be held May
26-27 in Washington, D.C.

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Official Senior
Announcements
ORDER NOW
at
Burr;' Patterson &iAuld
1209 South "U"
Ruth Ann Oakes, Mgr.

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Alice Faye, blonde film actress, and Phil Harris, orchestra leader,'
were married in Ensenada, Mex., they reported when they returned to
San Diego, Calif. They're shown dancing together before their marriage.
Cancer Statistics Are Reported
In University Hospital Bulletin,

that talks like a man, will be the
feature attraction at a lecture-dem-
Naval RO TC onstration to be given here Thursday,
May 22, by Dr. J. O. Perrine, assist-
ant vice-president of American Tele-
Unit Reviewed phone and Telegraph, entitled "Art-
ificial Creation of Speech."
Among the feats which Pedro will
District Reserve Director perform for his operator will be such
Inspct~s New Battalion things as jumping from the treble
IsetN _B tlo to a basso profundo with the flick
of a finger, speaking with any accent
Waterman Gymnasium was the requested, or even speaking infor-
scene of a colorful display as the j eign languages.
University's Naval ROTC unit was Dr. Perrine's accompanying lecture
Amsenwill use the machine as a demonstra-
reviewed by Capt. W. F. A tor to pointoutthe phonetic differ-
U.S.N. in a ceremony at 8 p.m. yes- ences between such words as "church"

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By HOWARD FENSTEMAKER
A total of 5,101 cancer growths
were recorded at the University Hos-
pital between February 1, 1936, and
Dec. 31, 1939, 1,341 of which were dis-
13vered during 1939, the University
Cancer Committee has reported in the
May issue of the University Hospital
Bulletin.
The committee, composed of Prof.
Fred Jenner Hodges and Prof. Isa'-
Fore Lampe of the roentgenology de-
)artment and Lawrence Barbier,
medical statistician, -operates at the
University Hospital in an organized
;linical investigation of all cancer
rases admitted there. The latest re-
port is the fifth in a series of sta-
distical releases.
Slightly less than half of the pa-
;ients surveyed since the inception of
.he investigation were reported liv-
ing on Jan. 31, 1941. Of the pa-
ients admitted during 1939, 786
were living and 515 dead on that date.
Not all the deaths were caused by
cancer neoplasms, however, the re-
ports pointed out, a small percentage
Ohio State Zoologist
Will Lecture Today
Dr. J. Allen Scott; of, Ohio State
University, will speak on "Manson's
Blocd-Fluke, a Public Health Prob-
lem in Venezuela" at 4:15 today in
:he Natural Science Auditorium in a
Jniversity Lecture sponsored by the
Department of Zoology.
Until last year, Dr. Scott, was a
representative of the field staff of
the Health Division of the Rockefeller
Foundation. From 1929 until 1937 he
studied Egyptian blood-flukes in that
country and from 1937 until 1940 he
investigated Manson's blood-flukes in
Venezuela.
Blood-flukes are a form of para-
sites prevalent in South America and
in the Orient where they often prove
fatal. They are similar to the para-
sites which cause swimmer's itch in
this country.

of the deaths being postoperative.
others having other causes.
General surgery service reported
the greatest number of cases, with
402 in 1939 and 1,548 during the
total period. Second was the de-i
partment of medicine, which reported
216 neoplasms in 1939 and 775 as a
total.
Wayne County led in the number of
patients, it was learned, with 718
from that county during the course
of the survey, 207 of whom were ad-
mitted for treatment during the year
1939. During the period of the or-
ganized investigation, 188 of the pa-
tients were from Washtenaw County,
52 of that group having been added
in 1939.
An extremely detailed table on the
diagnosis of the neoplasms has been
published with th2 report. The
growths have been classified into 221
distinct types, 30 of which were dis-
covered and added to the list during
1939. Included in the data for each,
type are average patient age, average
duration after admission, types of
treatment, number and causes of
death, and sex of the patients in each
classification.
Teachers Attend Meet
Prof. Richard Schneidewind of the
metallurgical engineering department
and Prof. E. J. Ash of the metal pro-
cessing department are attending a
meeting of the American Foundry-
men's Association which began Mon-
day in New York City and will
continue through today. Professor
Schneidewind has been named Gen-
eral Chairman of three committees.

terday witnessed by friends and par-
ents of the cadets.
Captain Amsden, director of Naval
Reserves for the Ninth Naval District,
was representing the Commandant of
the district in inspecting and review-
ing the unit. He had previously in-
spected the NROTC and its North
Hall headquarters during the day.
After the members of the corps,
headed by Battalion Commander Bur-
nett H. Crawford, '44, had been re-
viewed by Captain Amsden, the four
platoons of the unit vied with each
other in competition for a trophy
which will be awarded in the near
future to the platoon which leads
in drill and other accomplishments..
In a lecture at 4 p.m. yesterday in!
the Rackham Building, Captain
Amsden discussed the opportunities
for college men in naval aviation and
in other branches of the service. Only
two years of college is required for
admission to the Naval Reserve Avia-
tion program.

and "shirts," and will explain the
operation of the machine to the audi-
ence.
Constructed entirely of telephone
apparatus, with the exception of the
organ-like keybord, the mechanical
voice was on display at both the San
Francisco and New York World's
Fairs and created quite a sensation at
both places.
Ruthven To Be Honored
President and Mrs. Alexander
Ruthven will be the guests of honor
at a University of Michigan Club
banquet in Adrian today. The Presi-
dent will deliver a short, impromptu
talk on the University.

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS
AND INVITATIONS
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See our samples and let us quote prices.
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Come all ye..
to the
DOODLE
DANCE
the "Doodler's Delight"
*ART AWARDS
*SALE OF DRAWINGS
NOVELTY SOUVENIRS
LARRY DOUGLAS' SWING BAND
INFORMAL

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