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May 15, 1941 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-15

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DA-L Y

THURSDAY, MAY 15, 1941

NOUNiiiii illlimllil

Dr. C. A. Fisher
Will Address
State Teachers

Student Opinion Poll Indicates
Increasing Intervention Trend

Visual:
Will
Film

Education Institute'
Open Tomorrow;
Showing Planned

School administrators and teach-
ers from all over the state will con-
vene in Ann Arbor tomorrow for the
annual two-day Visual Instruction
Institute sponsored by the Bureau of
Visual Education and the University
Extension Service.
The conference will open at 9:30
a.m. tomorrow with a registration
period in the lobby of the Rackham
Building. At 10 a.m. Dr. C. A. Fish-
er, director of the Extension Serv-
ice, will keynote the Institute with an
address in the Rackham Lecture
Hall on "The Purpose of the Visual
Instruction Institute."
Highlight of the first session will
be a talk by Dr. J. A. Hollinger,
director of 'Science and Visualiza-
tion, Pittsburgh Public Schools, fol-
lowing Dr. Fisher's opening address.
His subject will be "What Experience
Has Taught Us About Aids to Per-
ceptual Learning."
A luncheon will be held at 12:15
p.m. in the League, at which time
several documentary films, including
"The City" and "War and Order"
will be shown.
The afternoon session will feature
a panel discussion at 2 p.m. in the
Rackham Lecture Hall on various
phases of visual education. Dr. Hol-
linger will lead the panel.
From 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., and again
from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., the new films
of the Extension Service will be
shown. These will include social
study films on geography, and his-
tory, and films on science.
fi

By GEORGE W. SALLADE
University students are better in-
formed than the average citizen in
the United States and show an in-
creasing trend towards intervention
in the European War according to the
records compiled by the Bureau ofj
Student Opinion after two years of
intensive polling on the campus.
In a series of polls conducted ev-
ery six months since the war began
in September, 1939, the campus has
shown a marked trend toward in-
tervention in proportion to the in-
creasing victories of Adolf Hitler's
armies. In March of this year, how-
ever, 65 per cent still were against en-
tering the war even if Germany was
defeating England.
In May of 1940 when the blitzkrieg
was at its height 80 per cent were
against entering the war. (Neverthe-
less, 64 per cent felt in March of this
year that the United States would
be in the war within a year as com-
pared with only 36 per cent in Oc-
tober, 1940.
Campus Well Informed
In all the polls on current affairs
up to the present time a smaller per-
centage of indifferent answers were
obtained than in Gallup polls of a
similar nature. This indicates a better
informed public opinion on the cam-
pus as compared to the average com-
munity in the country.
In special surveys on the lease-lend
bill 46 per cent of the people inter-
viewed favored passage of the mea-
sure. In the same interviews students
were asked if they favored the Hoov-
er proposal for sending food to the
five small democracies. 50 per cent
were for and 34 per cent against this
plan.
In the November poll on the presi-

CLASSIFIED ADVEHTISIMG

dential election Willkie received 48
per cent and Roosevelt 38 per cent.
Of those preferring Willkie 32 per cent
thought the United States would be
involved in war withi na year and 51
per cent were uncertain. Of the Roose-
velt supporters 35 per cent felt war
would come to the United States with-
in a year while 54 per cent were firmly
convinced that war would be avoided.
Bureau Going Since '37
The Bureau of Student Opinion has
been in operation since 1937. It was
begun by James Vicary, '40 and is
now under the direction of Frank A.
Bender, '43. The first txyo years were
devoted mainly to experimental work
on religious questions.
The same technique as that of the
Gallup Poll is used. A representative
group of 5 per cent of the total cam-
pus enrollment is selected for ques-
tioning. This group is broken down
into the right proportion for each
college and school and the right pro-
portion of men and women in that
school.
The selected group is then further
subdivided into the correct proportion
of classes and religious sects. Fre-
quent tests are made to determine
if the stdents are representative or
not.
One of these tests is based on the
ROTC. The selected, group is asked
how many are military science- stu-
dents and if the proportion is the
same as the all-campus proportion
the group is representative. The last
test was correct within .6 per cent.
Gold Life Pius
Still Available
500 Yet To Be Claimed
By Seniors At Union
Any man student completing at
least four years of accredited aca-
demic work this June is entitled to
a Michigan Union gold life member-
ship pin. More than 500 of the pins
have yet to be claimed according to
Jack Grady, '42, secretary of the
Union.
Life membership entitles Michigan
men to all the privileges of the Union
at any time after leaving the campus.
This includes use of the pool, bil-
liard room, bowling alleys, Pendleton
Library, and in the regular week-end
dances. Life members are also per-
mitted to cash checks at the Union
whenever desired.
The pins may be obtained by calling
at the Michigan Union Business Of-
fice on the basement floor any week-
day between 3 and 5 p.m.
Graduating seniors who attempt to
claim pins after a year from this June
will be forced to pay $50 for the life
membership. Since the installation of
the plan in 1926, more than 13,000
pins have been distributed to former
Michigan men.
Garg's June Edition
To AppearTuesday
Life with all its complications and
vagaries will be the subject of the
June issue of Gargoyle making its
appearance on newsstands next Tues-
day.
Dave Donaldson, '41, editor, has
promised a special, full page close-
up of Alexander G. Ruthven, intro-
ducing an illustrated expose of the
president's intimate past and present
life.
This will, however, comprise only
a fraction of the estimated 150 photo-
graphs assembled into this issue of
the magazine. The rest will be devot-
ed, among other things, to a sculpture
exhibit, R.O.T.C. drills and campus
peace rallies.

Alumni ClubsJ
Plan To Honor
Prep Students
Fifty High School Juniors
To Be Campus Guests
For First Award Day<
University of Michigan Clubs from
more than 15 cities will sponsor their
first Michigan Junior Award Day
at the University tomorrow.
At this time, the University will+
play host to more than 50 high school
juniors, selected by the alumni or-
ganizations in their respective citiesI
to receive the special two-day visit
to Ann Arbor.
Through interviews with secondary+
school principals and junior class ad--
visers, the winning students were cho-
sen, and alumni made arrangements
for their transportation and ex-
penses.
Arriving in Ann Arbor Friday af-
ternoon, the students will be pro-
vided rooms and guidance by the
Union facilities at special rates or to
otherwise amuse themselves.
Saturday's program will consist of
conducted tours of the campus, inter-
views with professors and administra-
tive officers, a luncheon and at-
tendance at the Michigan-Indiana
baseball game. Evening entertain-
ment will, as before, center about the
Union.-
Alumni Association, in promoting
this innovation, has set forth a double
purpose. University of Michigan Clubs
will be able to become better ac-
quainted with the high school juniors
in their vicinities, and the students
who are given an opportunity to see
the University can plan the rest of
their high school program with some-
thing more definite in view and help
their classmates do the same.
Kiopsic Made
New Manager
For Glee Club
At the annual banquet of the Var-
sity Glee Club held last night at
the Union, Clarence Klopsic, '42BAd,
was named manager of the Glee Club
for the coming year.
Klopsic, who succeeds James Ber-
ger, '41, was on the orchestra com-
mittee for the Capitalists' Ball and
took part in last year's Mimes Opera.
Other officers, elected Tuesday,
are president, Cary Landis, '42; vice-
president, James Crowe, '43; secre-
tary, Kenneth Repola, '43, and treas-
urer, Donald Whitney, '42E.
Following the dinner, movies of
the spring trip were shown. Guests
at the banquet were Dean of Stu-
dents Joseph A. Bursley; Assistant
Dean Walter B. Rea; Herbert G.
Watkins, assistant secretary of the
University and business manager of
Glee Club; Charles A. Sink, president
of the University Musical Society;
Prof. Earl V. Moore, director of the
School of Music; T. Hawley Tapping,
general secretary of Alumni Associa-
tion, and Hardin A. Van Deursen,
assistant professor of voice.

Benton Bailey

Detroit AIEE
Speaking on "The Development of
Electrical Engineering in Michigan,"
Prof. Benton F. Bailey of the electri-
cal engineering department will give
a talk at Past Chairmen's Night of
the American Institute of Electrical
Engineers Tuesday, May 20, in De-
troit.
As he practically grew up with the
electrical engineering industry, Pro-
fessor Bailey is well qualified to lec-
ture on this topic, having been en-
gineer for the Detroit Edison Com-
pany at the turn of the century,
(when Henry Ford was chief engin-
eer) and later chief engineer. of the
Fairbanks Morse Company, pioneers
in the development of alternating
current motors.
Several Michigan men figured
prominently in the development of
electrical engineering, according to
Professor Bailey, among them Profes-
sor Langley who taught at the Uni-
versity; Charles Brush, a Michigan
graduate; a forgotten genius by the
name of VanDepoole who lived in
Detroit for a time, and of course,
Thomas A. Edison, at one time a
Michigan resident.
Newman Club
,Holds Election
Albini Schinderle Elected
P~resident Of Society
president of the Newman Club at its
annual election of officers Sunday in
St. Mary's Student Chapel. The New-
man Club is a national organization
of Catholic students in non-sectarian
colleges.
Other officers include: James
Landers, '43, men's vice-president;
Catherine Norton, '42, women's vice-
president; Sally Walsh, '43, secretary;
and James Keenan, '41BAd, treasurer.
The retiring officers are Burns
Huttlinger, '41, president; Albin
Schinderle, '42, men's vice-president;
Mary Jane Kenney, '41, women's
vice-president; Geraldine Granfield,
'42, secretary; and John McNaugh-
ton, Grad., treasurer.
A communion breakfast for all
Newman Club members will be held
Sunday, May 25, after 10:00 mass.
Iterviews Continue
Interviewing for central committee
positions for JGP and for Theatre
Arts will continue from 5 p.m. to
6 p.m. today and from 3 p.m. to 5
p.m. tomorrow. Eligibility cards are
required.
The final examination schedule
for the College of Literature, Sci-
ence and the Arts appears correct-
ly on page 11 of the Supplementary
Announcement. It differs, however
from the one on page 24 of the
regular Announcement. The dates
under "Time of Examination"
should be increased by two.

THURSDAY, MAY 15, 1941
VOL. LI. No. 160;
Publication in the. Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University.
Notices
Smoking In University Buildings:
Attention is called to the general rule
that smoking is prohibited in Univer-
sity buildings except in private offices
and assigned smoking ,rooms where
precautions can be taken and control
exercised. This is neither a mere arbi-
trary regulation nor an attempt to
meddle with anyone's personal habits.
It is established ano enforced solely
with the purpose of preventing fires.
In a recent five year period, 15 of the
total of 50 fires reported, or 30 per
cent, were caused by cigarettes or
lighted matches.Tobbe effective, the
rule must necessarily apply to bring-
ing lighted tobacco into or through
University buildings and to the light-
ing of cigars, cigarettes,, and pipes
within buildings-including lighting
just previous to going outdoors. With-
in the last few years a serious fire was
started at the exit from the Pharma-
cology building by the throwing of a
still lighted match into refuse wait-
ing removal at the doorway. If the
rule is to be enforced at all its en-
forcement must begin at the building
entrance. Further, it is impossible
that the rule should be enforced with
one class of persons if another class
of persons disregards it. It is a dis-
agreeable and thankless task to "en-
force" almost any rule. This rule
against the use of tobacco within
buildings is perhaps the most thank-
less and difficult of all, unless it
has the support of everyone con-
cerned. An appeal is made to all
persons using the University build
ings-staff members, students and
others-to contribute individual co-
operation to this effort to protect
University buildings against fires.
This statement is inserted at the
request of the Conference of Deans.
Shirley W. Smith
To the Members of the University
Senate: The second regular meeting
of the University Senate will be held
on Monday, May 19, aJ 4:15 p.m. in
the Rackham Lecture Hall.
AGENDA:
1. Questions concerning the codifi-
cation of the By-Laws of the Board
of Regents raised in a request from
several members for a special meet-
ing.
2. Hospitalization Plan, Vice-Presi-
dent S. W. Smith.
3. New Education Fellowship, Vice-
President C. S. Yoakum.
4. Statistics on Enrollment, Regis-
trar I. M. Smith.
Louis A. Hopkins, Secretary
Engineering Seniors: If you are ex-
Dr. Conger To Speak
Dr. Kyril Conger, professor of sur-
gery, will address the American Uro-
logical Association at its annual con-
vention which will be held in Denver,
Colo., May 18-22.

Will Address DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

pecting to graduate in June, 1941, you
should fill out the Diploma Applica-
tion in the Secretary's office, Room
263 West Engineering Building, not
later than May 21. No fee is required.
Graduation may be delayed if the ap-
plication is late.
C. B. Green,
Assistant Secretary
Senior Literary Students: It is
urged that all senior Literary stu-
dents wishing caps and gowns for
Swing Out place their orders as soon
as possible. It will be impossible to
fill orders unless sufficient time is
given: No deposit is required on
placing order.
'41 Literary Cap and Gown Committee
Summer Work, Sales: Several com-
pahties have good sales jobs available
for the summer and are interested in
interviewing men on campus in the
near future. Will students who are
interested please get in touch with
the Bureau of, Appointments, 201
Mason Hall, at once.
The University Bureau of Appoint-
ments and Occupational Information
has received notice of the following
Civil Service Examinations. Last
date for filing application is noted
in each case:
MICHIGAN CIVIL SERVICE
Fingerprint Expert A, salary $130,
May 28, 1941.
Fingerprint Clerk Cl, salary $95,
May 28, 1941.
Fingerprint Clerk B, salary $105,
May 28, 19411
Housemaid D, salary $75, May 28,
1941.
Watchman C, salary $80, May 28,
1941.
Telephone Operator C, salary $80,
May 28, 1941.
Laundry Worker D, salary $75, May
28, 1941.
Laundry Worker Cl, $95, May 28,
1941.
Laundry Worker B, $105, May 28,
1941.
Laundry Worker A2, $115, May 28,
1941.
NEW YORK CIVIL SERVICE
Hospital Attendants, salary $54 to
$66 plus maintenance June 3, 1941.
(Continued on Page 4)

LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St., Phone 3916. Ic
WANTED TO BUY -4
CASH for used clothing; men and
ladies. Claude H. Brown, 512 S.
Main St. Phone 2-2736. 31c
WANTED - ANY OLD OR NEW
CLOTHING, PAY FROM $5.00 to
$500 FOR SUITS, OVERCOATS,
TYPEWRITERS, FURS - PER-
SIANS, MINKS. PHONE ANN AR-
BOR 6304 for APPOINTMENTS.
SAM.
FOR RENT
ROOMS to rent for fall and sum-
mer. Approved house. Call 8726.
371
UNUSUALLY NICE 3 or 4 room, fur-
nished. Private bath. Heat and
hot water. 1327 S. State. 3821
SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS-
Large, comfortable rooms, two
blocks from campus, reasonable.
Call 4850 or inquire 806 Hill.
ATTRACTIVELY FURNISHED two-
room apartment-3-way ventila-
tion-Private bath--shower. Re-
frigeration. One adult. 602 Mon-
roe. 365
FORDU AM UNIVERSITY
SCHOOLO F LAW
NEW YORK
Case System
Three-Year Day Course
Four-Year Evening Course
Co-educational
Member of the Association of American
Law Schools
College Degree or Two Years of
College Work with Good Grades
Required for Entrance
Transcript of Record Must Be Furnished
Morning, Early Afternoon and
Evening Classes
For further information address
Registrar of Fordham Law School
233 Broadway, New York

TRANSPORTATION
H. B. GODFREY
MOVING - STORAGE -PACKING
Local and Long Distance Moving.
410 N. Fourth Ave. Phone 6297
29c
SITUATIONS WANTED -2
SITUATION WANTED-Experienced
couple for fraternity cook and por-
ter. First class local reference.
Phone 6764. 350
EXPERIENCED COOK with good
references would like position in
fraternity for fall. Write Box No.
1, Michigan Daily.
LOST and FOUND
LOST - Female Dalmatian coach
dog. Answers to name of "Lady."
Reward. Call 2-3762. 384
TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 14c
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
FOR SALE
THOROUGHBRED English Setter
puppies, registered. Good hunting
strain. 3005 Plymouth Road. Ph.
5132. 366
MISCELLANEOUS
BEN THE TAILOR pays the best
price for used clothes. 122 E.
Washington. le
EXPERT HOSIERY and garment re-
pair. Reasonable rates. Weave-Bac
Shop-Upstairs in Nickels Arcade.
PAINTING, Decorating, Paper Hang-
er. Blending and stippling. Work
samples shown. Phone 2-2943. 363
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. 19c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 5c
WISE Real Estate Dealers: Run
listings of your vacant houses in
The Daily. Dial 23-24-1 for spe-
cial rates. 353

You can buy
ARkROW shirts, ties
and underwear
downtown at

322 S. Main

Ph. 3228

U I'. . _

w

WTHEN GAY FORTUNE-
HUNTERS MEET'
A merry uproar involving
a gay widow-love-and
a million dollars!

. "-, ;.
. ,
,, -
.ae"'

Nothing's

WEEK DAY SHOWINGS 2-4-7-9 P.M. I

Refreshing as

Matinees 25c Incl. Tax
STARTS TODAY!

" AIAJEJTIC

foot i- th ilk00
anid the or
Sother fe
ROBERT
CUMMINGS
RUTHHUSSEY
JUDITH
ANDERSON
C. AUBREY SMITH
NIGEL BRUCE
REGINALD OWEN
ETOM CONWAY
Screen Play by
SMARVI N SOROWSKY
Directed by
GEORGE SIDNEY
Smo.

Sport Shirts for Athletes
(Armchai r and Otherwise)
YOUR old friend Arrow makes sport shirts good looking
and comfortable, fine for lounging as well as for active
sports. They haven't any doodads or flossy color scheme to
distract you or others.
The models include the in-or-outer type, short or long
sleeves, button-front or pull-over. And believe it or not, you
can get Arrow sport shirts in your exact collar size! Buy
some today and get ready for the great outdoors.
Cut and sown sport shirts $2 up; knitted shirts $1 up,
r
AR ROJ'VSHIRTS

ARBOR
SPRINGS

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WATEIR

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