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May 09, 1941 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MAY J, 1941

_ _

Detzer To Give
Reply Sunday
To Isolationists
Editor Of Reader's Digest
To Lecture At Meeting
Of Ann Arbor -Group
Karl Detzer, one of America's color-
ful career men, and present Roving
Editor of the Reader's Digest, will
answer the isolationist arguments in
a lecture, "Let Us Face The Truth,"
to be given at 4:30 p.m. Sunday in
the Rackham Lecture Hall.
The talk is sponsored by the Ann
Arbor chapter of the Committee To
Defend America by Aiding the Allies,
Prof. Bradley Davis of the botany de-
partment, chairman.
Born and schooled in Indiana, Det-
zer has led a full and varied life.
Prior to the World War, in which he
was an infatry captain, he had been
a Fort Wayne reporter. In 1919, he
Karl Detzer and Prof. James K.
Pollack of the political science de-
partment will discuss "Shall We
Let Hitler Win?" from the campus
Studios in cooperation with WJR
at 9:45 p.m. Sunday. The broad-
cast is to be an answer to the views
presented over WJR last Sunday
by isolationist Senator Burton K.
Wheeler.
was 'with the Division of Criminal
Investigations (American Secret Po-
lice in Europe)
Detzer has been highly successful
as a writer. Author of some hundreds
of fiction stories, he has been made
an honorary member of the Michigan
State Police in recognition of his
stories about that organization in the
Saturday Evening Post.
His later work with Hollywood has
resulted in a technical directorship
and in the production of his screen
play, "Car 99." Other well-known
works by Detzer are: "True Tales of
the D.C.I.," "The Marked Man," and
"Pirate of the Pine Lands."
ASDL Leader
To Broadcast
On Food Plan
Martin Dworkis, Grad., president
of the local chapter of the American
Student Defense League, will take
part in a nationwide broadcast, con-
sidering the Hoover Food Plan, at
10:15 p.m. (EST) Sunday.
On the program with Dworkis will
be students from the University of
Texas, Dartmouth and Brooklyn Col-
lege and two prominent adults. +
The broadcast is sponsored by the
Student Defenders of Democracy, with
which the American Student Defense
League is affiliated. The speakers
will present an answer to the Hoover
Food Committee's youth program of
about a month ago.
Campus discussion groups are be-
ing organized to consider the points
brought forth in the broadcast. Any
individuals or groups who wish lead-
ers or materials to help in the dis-
cussions should contact Leroy Con-
tie, '42, vice-president of the ASDL.
Similar groups are also being or-
ganized around a radio address on
"Today's Challenge to the Youth of
America," which will be delivered by
Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt at 9:15 p.m.
Tuesday, May 13.

The First Lady's talk will keynote
a nationwide rally of the Student De-
fenders of Democracy in which the
Michigan chapter will cooperate.

To Speak Here

ROTC's Key Faculty Members
May Be Listed For Deferment

Ann Arbor

Forestry Club Will Elect Officers

here Is
In

Today's
Summary

News

KARL DETZER

Lecture

Series

Will Be Given
For Engineers
41 Aeronautical Students
Will Hear Five Talks
On Aviation Problems
A series of lectures designed to
round-out the regular program of-
fered by the aeronautical engineer-
ing department, and give the grad-
uating engineers a more thorough
and comprehensive knowledge of the
problems confronting the aviation in-
dustry has been announced by Prof.
Edward A. Stalker, department chair-
man.
All lectures will be offered at 11
a.m. in room 1042 East Engineering
Building.
Ezra Kotcher of the Air Corps En-
gineering School at Wright Field,
Dayton, Ohio, will present the first
lecture May 15 on "The Compressi-
bility Burble and Its Relation to the
High Performance Airplane."
"Airplane Stability" will be the
topic of a talk to be given May 20
by Vernon Outman, Chief of Aero-
dynamics of the Glenn Martin Co.
On May 22, the third lecture, "De-
sign of Seaplanes and Flying Boats,"
will be delivered by J. T. Ellis of the
Dow Chemical Co., formerly with the
Vought-Sikorsky Aircraft Co.
"Rational Methods of Calculating
the Magnitude and Distribution of
Air Loads Due to Pitching and Rolling
Manuevers" is the subject of William
H. Meller's USNR lecture May 22.
The final talk, May 29, will be giv-
en by C. S. MacNeil, Chief Engineer,
Aeroproducts Division, General Mot-
ors, on the topic, "Design and Selec-
tion of Propellers."
Women Debaters
To Compete Today
Four members of the women's in-
tercollegiate debating team will travel
to Wayne University in Detroit today
where they will discuss the question:
"Resolved: That Liberal Arts Col-
leges Shculd Admit Only Those Per-
sons Who Were in the Upper 25 Per
Cent of Their Secondary School
Graduating Classes."
Elizabeth Shaw, '41, and Jean Max-
ted, '41, will uphold the negative
while Mildred Ward, '41, and Virginia
Holland, Grad., wil take the affirm-
ative, against two Wayne teams.
Any freshmen or sophomores
who are interested in the Gar-
goyle business staff are asked to
meet at the Gargoyle office in the
Student Publications Building at
3:30 uesday afternoon.

By HOMER SWANDER
(This is the third of a series on the
Selective Service Act, written in col-
laboration with Prof. Louis Hopkins,
Chairman of the University Commit-
tee on National Defense.)
Members of the Reserve Officers'
Corps who are key members of the
University faculty may, as a result
of a recent order of the War Depart-
ment, be deferred from active service
at the request of President Alexander
Ruthven.
The order comes from the realiza-
tion that an educator may do a
greater service to the nation in his
civilian status.
"The present conception of modern
warfare," the War Department states,
"recognizes the contribution to na-
tional defense that is made by the
established educational institutions
engaged in the training of technical
personnel necessary in the produc-
tion of national defense items ofj
equipment and supply."'
Must Be 'Key' Man
To be transferred to the Reserve
Officers' Pool, however, it must be
clearly shown by the president of the
institution that the educator in ques-
tion is "a key member of the faculty
actually engaged in the instruction
primarily of junior and senior stu-
dents; that these students when
graduated are necessary in the pro-
duction of national defense items of
equipment and supply; and that the
officer cannot be satisfactorily re-
placed."
Of course, the War Departmient at
all times reserves the right to ap-
prove or disapprove a request and
to reverse a favorable decision when-
ever the service of the individual is
required in the armed forces of the
country.
Transfer Request Needed
A separate transfer request, in tri-
plicate, must be addressed to the
Assistant Secretary of War for eachl
faculty member. Such information
as the following is required in each
case: rank and military organiza-
Iion; marital status and number of
'dependents; present position and
length of time therein; subjects and
classes taught; justification of classi-
fication as a key employe; and how
the training of the student person-

nel taught is related to national de-
fense.
The age of the applicant will also
be an important factor. The Reserve
Corps has been divided into four age
groups in the order of their value to
the military service.
The first group, 21 to 25, are young
officers who are more familiar with
the latest military tactics and at the
same time, are probably the least
valuable to educational institutions.
The majority of the second group,
26 to 32, are also considered more
necessary to the armed forces than to
the teaching profession.
Men In Third Group
Most of the key men in the uni-
versities and colleges are in the third
and fourth age groups-33 to 44 and
45 and over respectively. These last
classifications are generally consid-
ered more valuable to education than
to mili ary service. However, even
here it hxust be shown that they are
key faculty members.
No blanket classifications are being
contemplated by the War Depart-
ment. Also, the procedure applies only
to the Reserve Officers' in the United
States Army. It does not include
enlisted reservists, National Guard
personnel, or Naval or Marine Corps
commissioned or enlisted reserve per-
sonnel.
E. D. Round, Flyer,
To Talk On Aviation
At Institute Meeting
Edson Donald L. Round, a graduate
of the University and of Pensacola,
will give a talk on his recent flying
and training experiences at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday before a meeting of the stu-
dent branch of the Institute of Aero-
nautical Sciences in room 1042 East
Engineering Building, Le'slie J. Trigg,
'41E, president, announced yesterday.
Other business that will be trans-
acted is an election of officers for
next year, and the appointment of
committees for the Institute banquet
May 27 at which Robert Woods, de-
signer of the "Aircobra," will be the
feature speaker.

Kiwanis Club members will turn
newsboys tomorrow and take over thq
city street corners to sell the annual
edition of the Ann Arbor News to
raise funds for aiding crippled child-
ren.
James McCarthy, chairman of the
sale, has set a goal of $1,000 for mem-
bers to shoot.at. Money raised will be
used to aid unfortunate and needy
children in the University Hospital.
Ann Arbor schools will hold their
own at May Festival Monday in Hill
Auditorium when orchestras, bands,
chorus' and glee clubs will participate
in a huge songfest.
Featured soloist of the evening's
program will be Thelma Lewis, vocal
professor in the University School of
Music.
When his hat blew into the back
seat of his car, Theodore E. Pratt,17,
route 1, reached for it. The car struck
a tree and Pratt is in the hospital
suffering from bruises and shock.
His condition is reported as good.

._^ _.

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Voting for the 1941-42 officers of
the Forestry Club will be held from
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today in the forestry
seminar room of the Natural Science
Building.
Candidates nominated for the po-
sitions were announaced yesterday.
For president, William C. Finley,
'41F&C, and John E. O'Leary, '42-
F&C, were nominated. For the com-
bined position of vice president and

II

social chairman, Chester J. Ewing,
'42F&C, Lawrence E. Howard, '42-
F&C, and Alex Yorman, '42F&C, will
be the candidates.
Men Get Heads Together
LANSING, May 9.-VP)--Two work-
ers were fatally injured today in an
odd accident which reportedly caused
them to fracture each other's skulls
in a head-to-head collision.

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