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May 04, 1941 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


T H E MI C iGAIN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

Forum Series
Will Sponsor
JT H. 'Holmes
Anerican Civil Liberties
Union Head To Discuss
America's. Part In War
John Haynes Holmes, one of Amer-
ica's leading orators, will appear .on
the Michigan campus May 13 in the
Rackham Auditorium when he will
speak on "America's Part in the Euro-
pean War."
The lecture is being sponsored by
Ihter-Guild Council and the Hillel
Foundation's forum series.
Holmes has been head of the Amer-
ican Civil Liberties Union~since 1917,
and is especially noted for his work
in this organization.,
His varied and colorful career in-
cludes the position of Chairman of
the City Affairs Committee of New
York and the presidency of the All-
World Ganhi Fellowship. f
x He is at present pastor of the well-
knbwn Community Church of New
York and is one of the foremost
Protestant ministers in the country.
John Haynes Holmes graduated
sunma cum laude from Harvard Uni-
versity in 1902, where he was honored
with membership in Phi Beta Kappa.
He then followed up with post-grad-
uate work at Harvard, the Jewish In-
stitute of Religion, and St. Lawrence
University.
He is a famed and prolific author
whose many works include such vol-
umes as "The Revolutionary Func-
tion of the Modern Church," "New
Wars for Old," "Patriotism is Not
Enough," and collaborated on a play,
"If This Be Treason."

Ann Arbor Dramatic Festival'
Will Be Twelfth Annual Series

CONRAD NAGEL
Growing bigger and better every
year, the Ann Arbor Dramatic Season
Festival will this year present its
twelfth annual program.
Eleven years ago Ann Arbor play-
goers saw their first Drama Festival,
highlighted that year by Margaret
Anglin's performance in "Electra."
Since then scarcely a playwright
of distinction in American letters or
English literature has been omitted
from the Festival's list of plays, and
the finest actors of this era have been
presented in Ann Arbor.
Many Playwrights Represented
Shakespeare, Ibsen. Coward, Dul
Maurier, Wilde and many others have
been authors of plays brought here
for the Spring festival. And 1941 adds
to the list Samson Raphaelson, James
Thurber and Elliot Nugent, the bril-
liant G.B.S., and otlhers.
. Equally well-known have been the

L
.

:4f{
MADGE EVANS
actors presented here-Philip Meri-
vale,,Nazimova, Jane Cowl, Blanche
Yurka, Ruth Chatterton, Whitford
Kane and Cecil Humphreys to men-
tion but a few. This year's Festival
will add Conrad Nagel, Madge Evans.
Sylvia Sidney, Ilka Chase and many
others to the roster.
The Season will open May 19 with
the James Thurber-Eliot Nugent
comedy of campus life, "The Male An-
imal." Conrad Nagel has the leading
role. Ilka Chase will star in the sec-
end play, Samson Raphaelson's "Sky-
lark."
A mystery play, "Ladies in Retire-
ment," will. be the third presentation,
and will star Ruth Gordon. George
Bernard Shaw's "Man And Super-
man," will be presented the fourth
week, and will star Madge Evans.
'Golden Boy' Ends Season
Concluding the season will be Clif-
ford Odets' Broadway hit, "Golden
Boy," with Luther Adler re-creating
the role he made famous in New York.
Sylvia Sidney of screen and stage
fame, will play opposit him.
Prof. Valentine B. Windt of the
speech department, director of the
season last year, will return as direc-
tor. Mrs. Lucille Walz will be busi-
ness manager, and James D. Mur-
nan, company manager.
Starting tomorrow tickets for the
individual plays will be on sale in
the box office of the Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre, rather than in the
Garden Room of the League.

DAILY OFFICIAL
(Continued from Page 6)
church and then go to the Island for
their meeting.
6:30. The Roger Williams Guild
will meet in the Guild House, 5031
E. Huron. Prof. George Myers of
.he Department of Vocational Edu-
cation, will speak on the subject,I
"Choosing a Vocation," the second
in a series of discussions on "Cru-
cial Student Decisions."
First Congregational Church: 9:30
a.m. Junior and Intermediate Depts.
of Church School.
10:30 a.m. Kindergarten and Pri-
mary Depts. of Church School.
10:45 a.m. Services of Public Wor-
ship. Sermon entitled, "They Say,"
by Dr. L. A. Parr.
4:30 p.m. Student Fellowship will
hold an outdoor summer meeting
Sunday at Island Park. After a pro-
gram of games and a picnic supper,
vespers will be conducted.
First Church of Christ, Scientist:
Sunday morning service at 10:30.
Subject: "Everlasting Punishment."
Sunday School ate 11:45 a.m.
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church;
Sunday: 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion;
11:00 a. m. Holy Communion and
Sermon by the Rev. Henry Lewis;
11:00 a.m. Junior Church; 11:00 a.m.
Kindergarten, Harris Hall; 7:00 p.m.
College Work Program, Harris Hall.
"Bishop Williams-Man of Social
Vision." Games and refreshments.
Wednesday, Holy Communion at 7:30
a.m., Harris Hall. Tuesday and Fri-
day, tea from 4-5:30.
Ann Arbor Society of Friends meets
Sunday in Lane Hall. Silent meeting
for worship at 5:00 p.m., followed
by supper at 6:00. All interested are
invited.
First Presbyterian Church: Morn-
ing Worship, 10:45 a.m. Sermon, "The
Romance of Religion" by Dr. Lemon.
Westminister Student Guild, 6:00
p.m. meeting at 7:00 p.m. Supper at
6:00 followed by meeting at 7:00-
Forum discussion on "Christianity in
the Light of Dale Carnegie's Book on
How to Make Friends and Influence

not be held in check, "well-justified
alarm will bring us to war. step byI
step." f
After listing the military and ideo-
logical differences between the first
World War and the present conflict,
Professor Slosson predicted that a
militarized United States would be
reduced to the level of Continental

Addrc-sing the final assembly of Europe's conscript countries in the
the Michigan Interscholastic Press event of an Axis victory.
Association's annual three-day meet- Professor Slosson asserted that the
ing, Prof. Preston L. Slosson de- next German campaigns will be an
clarede ysterdav that if Hitler can- attempt to conquer Suez and Gibral-

0

Professor Slosson Lists Effects Of ar On U.S.

tar, although the closing of the Medi-
terranean to Britain would not be
conclusive. He maintained that the
war will be decided by the fleet con-
trolling the North Atlantic, which
he called the true life-line of the
British Empire.
If the Germans fail in an all-out
offensive, or are starved by the
blockade, he pointed out, there is a

'77
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What with the May Festival, The N
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possibility of insurrections allowing
Britain to gain an entering wedge
on the Continent.
The meeting closed with the pre-
sentation of awards for typographi-
cal and editorial excellence to the
Jackson High School Reflector and
Edison Institute Herald.
Lieut. Lohla Joins Staff
First Lieut. John A. Lohla, Corps
of Engineers, of Laurium, Michigan,
has joined the staff of the military
department of the University.

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bit of lingerie to make her private life
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People." All Presbyterian students and
Delta Sigma Rho their friends are invited.
President Is Muehi Unitarian Church. 11 a.m. Sunday
Morning May Forum. First of series,,
"Labor and Industry in the World
William Muehl, '41, was elected Crisis."
president of the local chapter of Speakers: Prof. Z. Clark Dickinson
Delta Sigma Rho, national forensic of the department of Economics-
fraternity, following initiation of new "The Government as Conciliator."
members, Thursday in the League. Mr. Ralph H. Marlett of Flint, pub-
Other officers elected were Janet ho relations director of the UAW-
Grace, '42, vice-president and R. Er- CIO of that area-"The Place of the
win Bowers, '41, secretary-treasurer. Union.
Question period will follow.
Prof. Howard S. Woodward of West-___Questionperiodwillfllow.
ern Reserve University, national
president of the organization, con- Grace, '42, June de Cordova, '41, and
ducted the initiation of Chester Mys- Rosebud Scott, '42.
licki, '42, Arthur Biggins, '42, Janet The organization which was found-

''

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