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April 30, 1941 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-04-30

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRILĀ°30,1941

Michigan Comes From Behind In Ninth To Down Sta

te, 4-3

6

don wirtehafter's
DAILY DOUBLE
This week's Doubles are being written by members of the junior staff. To-
day's column is by Art Hill who covered hockey during the winter and is now
handling tennis.
Hill Speaks On Baseball...
B ASEBALL FANS, put away your pencils and papers and stop worrying
about what's goingto happen and how they're going to finish in the
Major Leagues this year. Because, in response to an almost negligible de-
mand, we have consented to put that information down on paper for all
and sundry.
In the American League, generally speaking, the draft will hit two
clubs harder than the Detroit Tigers, in spite of all the Greenberg head-
lines. The Bengals are fairly well fortified in the outfield but the Chicago
White Sox, who lose John Rigney, will have a hard time coming up with
another fifteen-game winner.
And then there are the poor old Washington Senators. The Nats are
threatened with the loss of Buddy Lewis and Cecil Travis, which will leave
Manager Bucky Harris with a franchise, a headache and little more.
Taking the American League teams one by one, in the order in which
they'll finish, here's what's going to happen:
CLEVELAND-The Indians will win the flag not because, as has been
claimed, they all love each other like blood brothers but simply because of
the addition of one player to their roster. In Gee Walker, the Tribe has
picked up a man who loves to win and who can give the old apple a ride.
Walker will bat .326 and drive in 106 runs. He will be picked off base six
times but the fans will love it . . if Cleveland fans are capable of any
such emotion. First-baseman Hal Trosky will continue to field everything
that hits him in the chest.
DETROIT-The Tigers lose Greenberg but they have capable out-
fielders in Stainback, MCosky, Campbell, Ned Harris and Pat Mullin,
the latter now with Buffalo. After May 7, when Hank will shoulder a
musket and march off to play ball for the 32nd Division, Stainback will
be in center, McCosky in left and the other three will alternate in right.
Mullin will finally win the position because of superior fielding.
Rudy York will hit .315'and lead the loop in home runs with 38. Frankie
Croucher will develop into a fine shortstop and, with his position safe, will
stop making errors.
NEW YORK-The Yankees will continue to murder all kinds of pitch-
ing but their opponents will start murdering Yankee pitching before long
and the Bronx Bombers will have to be content with the show spot. Joe
DiMaggio will top all competitors in batting with a mark of .362.
The highly-touted keystone combination of Gerry Priddy and Phil Riz-
zuto will be topped only by Cleveland's Boudreau-Mack duo in the field but
neither of the lads will hit .300. Joe Gordon will become one of the best
first-basemen in the league.
ST. LOUIS-Fred Haney's lads are finally destined to leave the
second division. Lack of enough first-rate pitching will keep them from
going any higher. But Auker will be one of the best pitchers in the
league and young Bob Harris will win an even dozen games. Surprise
player of the little Brownies will be Bobby Estalella who will shove Chet
Laabs out of his outfield position before mid-season.
CHICAGO-The Sox would rate one spot higher if they could have Rig-
ney all season. But they can't. Uncle Sam has spoken. He also has Rigney,
or will soon. But Jimmy Dykes, the Midway Magician, will continue to win'
about every other game if he has to play himself. And don't think he might
not have to before the season is over.
BOSTON-The saddest pitching staff in baseball continues to be the
saddest pitching staff in baseball. Jimmy Foxx will hit, Joe Cronin will hit,
Bobby Doerr will hit, Ted Williams will hit and probably, before the season
is over, they'll all have a try at pitching. There is no truth, however, to
the rumor that the Boston management will charge extra for left field seats
in an effort to take advantage of the fun-loving fans who show up just for
the spectacle of Williams trying to field a ground ball.
PHILADELPHIA-Connie Mack has celebrated his birthday this
year so the Sage of the Quaker City can put away the noise-makers.
There'll be no merry-making at Shibe Park this season.
WASHINGTON-First in war, first in peace and last in the American
League. George Case, the living, walking, talking refutation of the old
theory that all it takes to be an outfielder is speed, will lead the league in
stolen bases with 31, or possibly 32. Washington fans will be forgiven for
going wild over each and every pilfered sack because that's all they'll have
to cheer for.
The most valuable player in the league will be Joe DiMaggio, followed
in the balloting by Bob Feller and Rudy York.

Timely Hitting,
Muir's Pitching
BringVictory
Harms Doubles Winning
Run Home; Western Is
Wolverine Foe Today
(Continued from Page 1)
had only been able to solve for five
safeties and two runs.
Mekules opened the Michigan ninth
by getting Mike Sofiak to fly out
to right, but then he issued a pass
to Capt. Bill Steppon. Big Dick Wake-
field, who had scored the first Wol-
verine run on a tremendous home
run in the second, smashed a single
to left to move Bill to second, and,
after George Ruehle lined out to
second, Bud Chamberlain gunned a
hit to short to score Steppon and tie
it up. George Harms, hitless all day
up to that point, then stepped up
and punched a double into center
field, Wakefield crossed the plate
with the winning run and the ball.
game was over.
Hitting honors must go to Wake-
field, whose second inning homer off
one of Mekules' rare curve balls was
one of the longest blows ever hit at
Ferry Field. The b4ll carried well
over 400 feet on the fly, and was in
the tennis courts on one bounce.
Sofiak sparkled in the field, making
a beautiful stop of Wy Davis' ground-
er in the fourth to nip brother Will
at second, and came up with another
to rob Bill Fitzsimmons in the ninth.
The Wolverines face Western State
at 4 p.m. today. Sophomore Cliff Wise
will start the tilt against the Bron-
chos' All-American southpaw, Frank
(Stub) Overmire, one of the nation's
top collegiate hurlers.

Hurling Checked Spartan Sluggers

Fight Makes Barnard Winner
Team Man Combines Sheer Nerve, Determination
In Long Climb To Track Stardom
By HAL WILSON

Credit for the Wolverines' rousing 4-3 triumph over Michi-
gan State yesterday afternoon at South Ferry Field goes to, Neil Muir,
burly senior pitcher, who relieved Mickey Stoddard on the mound and
allowed only four hits in the last six innings. It was Catcher George
Harms' double in the ninth with Dick Wakefield and Bud Chamberlain
on base that turned defeat into victory for the Wolverines.

.

I

I

What! Harms Again?

II

Michigan State AB
Pellerin 2b ... ... 4
Duncan ss .......4
Will Davis rf . .. 4
Ladue if .........1
Wy Davis lf ...... 3
Fitzsimmons cf .. 4
Klewicki 3b .......2
Chlopan lb .......4
Wolkowicz c .... 3
Mekules p ...... 3
TOTALS........32

R
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
3

H O
0 3
0 0
2 1
0 0
0 1
0 1
1 1
1 18
0 1
1 0
5 *26

A
2
3
0
0
0
0
6
0
1
6
18

E
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,

Kolesar, Hatch
Test Bob's New
Grid Headgear
By HOE SELTZER
Down at the Field House they have
gone nuts.
A day or so ago this unsuspecting
writer happened to enter the equip-
ment room down there, which is
conducted by one Henry (Hank)
Hatch. And to his utter astonish-
ment he discovered Hank busily en-
grossed in smartly belting Varsity
football guard Bob Kolesar over the
head with a baseball bat.
Kolesar's head, to be sure, was en-
cased in an overly large football hel-
met, but nevertheless Henry's lusty
blows seemed to bear the murderous
intent of stoving in Bob's noggin.
Presently the two ceased their rare
sport, and during the ensuing armis-
tice explained 'the object of their
zany act:
Several times during the games
last fall Bob got clipped on or about
the region of the head by a driving
knee or shoe, and once by an art-
fully swung elbow, with the result
that he often used to hear the Car-
illon chimes ringing out when no-
body else did. It was decided to do
something about this, and until re-
cently Bob has been wearing/ an im-
provised, extra-well-padded football
hat pending the arrival of a spe-
cially designed headgear which was
to set a precedent in cranial pro-
tection.
And of course when the new bon-
net arrived it had to be tested for
practicability. Which is where Hank
Hatch and his Louisville Slugger
came in.
When asked if the novel headguard
had proved satisfactory, Kolesar re-
plied, "You can just quote me as
saying that the helmet is a thump-
ing success."

Yost Celebrates
70th Birthday
QuietlyToday
(Continued from Page 1)1
amazing active career of Michigan's
Grand Old Man must come to the end]
of the line this June. His eyes are
sad when he thinks about it. He can't
believe time has gone so fast.
A long, restful summer vacation re-
mains in Yost's plans, but after that;
he is not sure what may happen. He;
doesn't want to leave Michigan. That;
he is certain. "Retiring from all these;
wonderful associations 40 years have
brought me? No . . . Never," were his
heart-felt words.
"The lasting friendships that have
grown have long been sources of great
satisfaction to me and provide me
with fond memories which I shall
treasure always," he added.
And Michigan will never forget
its Grand Old Man.

Sheer nerve, determination and a
burning desire to succeed form the
rungs of the ladder on which Bob
Barnard has climbed to track star-
dom.
You have the word of Varsity Coach
Ken Doherty for that, and every sin-
gle one of the fighting little senior's
teammates will add their wholeheart-
ed affirmation.
Originally A Hurdler
Bob came to Michigan back in
1937 as a hurdler and has plugged
incessantly ever since to improve
himself. He hasn't devoted his talents
solely to timber-topping, however. No,
for Bob is a team man, and many's
the time he has been asked to shift
into another event in order that
Michigan might pick up another
couple points, maybe only a single
marker - but one that was perhaps
the decisive factor in winning a Wol-
verine title.
It was two years ago as a sopho-
more that Barnard received his first
crack at running a leg on the mile re-
lay team. Fifth man on the Wolver-
ines' crack quartet of Phil Balyeat,
Jack Leutritz, Ross Faulkner and
Warren Breidenbach, the well-knit
Winnetka, Ill., speedsterhoccasionally
filled in for Balyeat, who was fre-
quently bothered by an ankle injury.
Just Missed Letter
In the outdoor Conference meet
that year Bob missed winning his
varsity letter by scant inches when
he qualified for the 220-yard low
hurdle finals, but failed to nip the
fifth place man with a desperate
lunge at the tape. That hurt, sure,
but Bob never quit trying.
And it is this persistence that has
carried Bob to success this year. As
a full-fledged member of the Maize
and Blue, mile relay team, he has
never turned in a poor performance.
Shortly after the beginning of the
indoor campaign, Barnard was ser-
M CLUB MEETING
There will be an important M
Club meeting at 8 p.m. in the
Michigan Union this Thursday
evening. All members arere-
quested to be there.
Francis. Heydt, Sec'y-Treas.

BOB BARNARD
the relay for the low hurdles again
in dual meets against Notre Dame
and Ohio State. Bob likes to run the
quarter better, but Michigan points
come first.
Doherty Praises Bob
Doherty has lavish praise for Bob's
tireless efforts. "Barnard has devel-
oped his potential running ability as
far as any man I've ever coached,"
Ken says, "and this results largely
from his intense desire for improve-
ment and perfection in style."
That's high praise for any track-
man, but it's praise that took thou-
sands of hours of unceasing, unselfish
effort to attain.

iously spiked, incurring a wound
which required five stitches, but he
plunged back into competition more
determined than ever before.
Last Friday at the Drake Relays
Bob hit the peak performance of his
career with a 48.7 clocking for his
leg 'of the mile relay trial heat.
Now for the next two weeks he will
forgo the .open quarter and perhaps

*Two out when winning run scored.

Michigan Ali
Nelson cf ........ 4
Holman 1f'.......4
Sofiak ss .........4
Steppon 2b.......3
Wakefield rf .... 4
Ruehle lb .......3
Chamberlain 3b .. 4
Harms c .........4
Stoddard, p .......0
Pagel. ...........1
Muirp..........2
TOTALS.........33

R
0
0
0
1
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
4

H
1
2
0
0
2
0
2
1
0
0
0
8

0
0
4
1
2
0
13
3
3
1
0
0
27

A
0
0
3
2
0
1
5
1
1
0
0
13

E
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
0
0

*Batted for Stoddard in 3rd.'
Michigan State ....100 020 000-3
Michigan .......... 010 010 002-4
Runs batted in -- Muir, Mekules 2,
Wakefield, Chamberlain, Harms. Two

Seniors .. .

WE HAVE NEITHER THE SPACE n
League in full but they'll finish in
Louis, New York, Chicago, Pittsburgh,]
The Chicago Cubs, perennially the
in the business, are threatening to shoe
Major League
St andings

or the desire to deal with the National base hits Chavsbelain,He run
n this order: Brooklyn, Cincinnati, St. Wakefield. Stolen bases --- Wy Davis.
Boston and Philadelphia. Double play -- Pellerin to Chlopan.
most colorless and uninteresting club Left on bases -- Michigan State 4;
w a little life with the addition of Lou Michigan 5. Base on balls - off Muir
>Novikoff. But it isn't in the cards. 2; off Mekules 2. Struck out by Me-
The Russian willg barely top .300 al- kules 1; by Stoddard 1; by Muir 2.
though he will clout 22 round-trip- Hits off Stoddard -- 1 in 3 innings;
pers and aat 112 bowls of borscht. You off Muir -- 4 in 0 innings. Winning
can't be colorful unless you are also pitcher Muir. Time - 1:30. Um-
a good ball player. pires -- Lindsay and Knode.

I

Picice or Phone Your

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L
Cleveland........10 4
Chicago............8 4
New York .......... 9 6
Boston.............7 5
Detroit............ 5 7
Philadelphia........ 4 8
Washington..9
St. Louis ........... 3 7

Pt.
.714
.667
.600
.583
.417
.333
.308
,.300

Tuesday's Results
Detroit 5, Boston 3
St. Louis 3, New York 2
Cleveland 8, Philadelphia 3
Chicago 3, Washington 2
Wednesday's Games
Boston at Detroit
New York at St. Louis
Philadelphia at Cleveland
Washington at Chicago
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L ret.
Brooklyn ..........12 4 .750
St. Louis ...........9 3 .750
New York..........8 5 .515
Cincinnati ..........7 7 .500
Boston .......,. 6 8 .429
Chicago ........... 4 7 .364
Philadelphia ........4 10 .286
Pittsburgh......3 9 .250

TO ALL FRESHMEN
Is Your College Career
Coinpietel?
'lie Michigan Daily Business Staff offers you an
excellent opportunity to supplement your edu-
cation with practical experience. Valuable train-
ing is offered by the Daily in business and ad-
vertising. Gain the confidence so necessary for
a successful business career by becoming a mem-
ber of the Michigan D.aily Business Staff. All
freshmen interested should report to the me-
ing on Monday, APRIuL 28, 5 P.M.

I

Anno uncing
A NEW AND COMPLETE
GREETING CARD
DEPARTMENT
AT FOLLETT'S
You'll always find just the
right card in our careful-
ly selected line of GREET-
ING CARDS for all occa-
sions.

CAP

NOW

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GOWN Orders

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We have been selected the OFFICIAL OUTFITTERS
for ALL DEPARTMENTS of the University of Michigan.
NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED WITH ORDER
No Extra Charge for Swingout
~DOPS SoPS ANN

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