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April 26, 1941 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

P: sx

TIHEI MICHIGAN DAILY

SNITAPAT,

Traveling Board
Will E xamine
Cadet Applicants
Campuses To Be Visited
By. Army Examiners
For CadetFlying Corps
Anticipating a June graduate rush
of applications for Army Air Corps
Flying Cadet appointments, two Fly-
ing Cadet travelling examining
boards will take their facilities and
personnel to college campuses and
towns during May and June, Brig.
Gen. Charles H. Bonesteel, command-
ing the 6th Corps Area, announced at
his headquarters in Chicago today.
These boards are equipped to give
complete tests to Army Air Corps
Flying Cadet applicants between the
ages of 20 and 26, making it no longer
necessary to journey to Air Corps
stations for such examinations. The
Michigan board will be preceded by
an advance agent who will be at
ROTC headquarters April 29 to
May 1.
Visitors May See Carillon
Visitors may see theCarillon
played from 12 to 12:10 noonson
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays,
Prof. Percival Price,ndCarillonneur,
announced yesterday. Large groups
cannot be admitted because of lim-
ited accommodations, and children
must .be accompanied by their par-
ents, Prof. Price said.
CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY
TAILORING & PRESSING- 12
STOCKWELL residents - Skilled al-
terations promptly done. Just
across the street. Phone 2-2678.
A. Graves. 28c

Commencement Nears
For Graduates Of '41

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Senior Ball, Lantern Night
To Be Two Highlights
Of June Exercises
By ROBERT SPECKHARD
(To The Class Of '41)
The world is changing quickly
hese days outside the campus -
robably there were never so many
ray clouds in a June sky before -
ut commencement activities will go
n as usual this year without any
ubstantial change.
They're not far off, seniors. Com-
encement day itself will fall on the
1ht day of June - the first day, of
ummer. President Ruthven is work-
ng already over the manuscript of
is annual address.
Better Read DOB
Better read the DOb notices care-
ully these days; you wouldn't want
o slip up on one of those f requent
echnicalities. The folks would be aw-
ully disappointed if you missed the
oat after four long years. Which
hould also remind you to see about
odging facilities for the folks, right
ow.
If, perchance, you don't plan on
eing at the exercises, a petition for
such permission is in order. Though,
f you'll pardon out saying, so, the
Jniversity has never been advertised
s a correspondence school before, so
why not stay and enjoy graduation
week-end. %
There will be only one like it for
you and yours, and it's packed, with
etivities with the Senior Ball head-
ing the list. The concluding hit of
he drama season, Clifford Odet's
lay, "Golden Boy," starring Luther
Adler and Sylvia Sydney, will ruin
fternoons and evenings.
Alumni Sing
Along with all the returning alumni
you, can try your voice in Michigan
ongs at the Alumni Sing and Lan-
ern Night and danch at the annual
Witte Will Address
GroupHere May 5
Louis Witte, professor of sociology,
at the University of Chicago, will bej
he principal speaker at the annual
meetings of the Division of Social
Sciences on May 5 in Ann Arbor.
The lecture will be a part of the
regular University series of lecturesj
and weill be delivered at 4:15 p.m.
May 5 in Rackham Amphitheatre. A
uncheon will follow at 6:30 p.m.
Dr. Witte is chairman of the Social
Science Research Council committee'
>f University Social Science Research
>rganizations.

reunion dance 9at the Huron Hills
Country Club. Your folks can inspect
all the buildings and places they
heard about in your letters home, and
if they're alumni too, there is a host
of reunion luncheons, dinners and
teas to attend.
Saturday Is Big Day
Saturday will be the big day, and
at 5 p.m. a bugle call will signal the
formaticn of the commencement pro-
cession which will proceed to Ferry!
Field for the exercises at 6:15 p.m.
In case .of rain - which has only,
marred the exercises once in the last
fourteen years - the platform exer-
cises will be held in the adjacent
Field House. The musical whistle at
the Power House will indicate incle-
ment weather by two blasts at 4:45
and 5 p.m.
After the President's commence-
ment address and awarding of hon-
orary degrees, graduates will file
across the commencement platform
to receive recognition of graduation.
Diplomas will be distributed immed-
iately following the commencement
exercises from designated tables in
the large gymnasium of the Intra-
mural Building. Contrary to popularI
conception, this takes but a few mo-
ments, and must be done immediately
to avoid confusion and trouble for,
you and the University, which would
be an unpleasant beginning into a
world which already has an overdose
of trouble and confusion itself.
Friends Group
To Hear Talk

Hillel Offers
Scholarships
For Semester
Applications Are Accepted
Now For Two Awards;
May 5 Is Final Deadline
Applications for two $150 scholar-
ships for next semester are being
accepted at the Hillel Foundation,
Irving Zeiger, '41, assistant to the
director, announced yesterday.
District Six of the B'nai B'rith is
offering one of the scholarships to
the applicant who shows the best
qualifications scholastically, and has
demonstrated interest in Foundation
activities. The award will also be
made from the standpoint of neces-
sity.
The Hillel Hostess scholarship is
offered by the Pisgah Lodge of the
Detroit B'nai B'rith Women's Auxili-
ary on the basis of need and general
qualifications for the position.
The hostess serves at, the Founda-
tion afternoons during the school{
year to greet visitors and supervise
minor social functions such as use
of the extensive record collection.
Application blanks are now avail-
able at the Foundation, and must be
submitted before May 5. The recipi-
ents of the scholarships will be an-
nounced at the Hillel Banquet.
The Hillel Hostesses this year were
Joanne Cohen, '42, and Mildred Ger-
son, '42. Martin Dworkis, Grad., was
the winner of the other scholarship.
Alpha Phi Omega
Convenes For State
Conference Today
Members of Alpha Phi Omega
chapters on various college campuses
in Michigan are attending a confer-
ence on "What Place Does Alpha
Phi Omega Have on the College

A program of simplifying and low-t
ering the overhead costs of Michi-
gan's governmental structure by re-
ducing the number of local units
is recommended by Frank M. Landers t
of the Bureau of Government in ai
Bureau publication, "Units of Gov-l
ernment in Michigan" released yes-t
terday.
By reducing the local units there
will also be an improvement in ad-
ministration of governmental serv-
ices, and the operations of govern-
ment will be more effectively con-;
trolled by the voters, according toc
Landers. Landers warns againstt
economy at the expense of govern-;
mental services and urges that it be
sought through modernization of the
governmental structure instead.
Demand For Low Costs1
"With the inevitable future in-f
crease in federal taxes, there will be
a corresponding demand for reducing
state and local costs," Landers says.
Michigan has 8,294 units of govern-
ment, and this number is greater thant
the average number in most states.-
Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Wiscon-1
sin, N. Y. are the only ones with more1
On July 1, 1939, there were 83 coun-1

ties, 1,266 townships, 309 villages, 166 1
cities, 6,466 school districts, two port
districts, and one metropolitan dis-
trict besides the state government in
Michigan. Obvious defects, Landers
points out, are the wasteful duplica-
tion, and the necessity of long ballots
and frequent elections by the voter.
Financial Weakness
Many of these small units, be-
cause 6f financial weaxness are un-
able to employ competent personnel,
and also because of the great number
of units it is very difficult to dis-
tribute state aid satisfactorily, especi-
ally in the case of school aid.
Although duplication in government
is almost unavoidable with the large
area and the uneven distribution of
population and taxable resources that
exist in Michigan, Landers concludes,
if the cost of government is to be
lowered, these duplications must be
kept at a minimum.
However, it must be remembered
that reduction in the number of
governmental units should be :com-
bined with budgeting, accounting,
personnel recruitment and purchas-,
ing reforms.

Architecture Competition
Offers Five Awards
A contest offering five magazine
subscriptions as prizes is being spon-
sored by the Architectural Council
of the College of Architecture and De-
sign, according to Paul Rogers, '41A,
publicity chairman of the Council.
A prize will be given to the student
submitting! the best problem in Arch-
itecture 8, 9 or 10.
The , two students handing in the
best problems in the department of
decorative design will be given prizes,
and another award will be given in'
the landscape department.
All entries must be registered with
Sue Holtzman, '42A, in the second
floor drafting room of the Architec-
ture Building any Monday, Wednes-
day or Friday up until May 2.
Entries will be judged May 5.
Judges of the contest will be Don
Metz, '41A, Bill Harrison, '41A, Wes-
ley Lane, '41A, Prof. Ralph Hammett
and Prof. Jean Hubbard.

Landers Advocates Reduction
In Local Governmental Units

Contest Entries
Due By May

2

II ___________________________________________________________________________________________________

THE fiLLENEL HOTEL
O//!rJ a Compldeilo Srice
We specialize in\accommodations for private parties.
Private Dining Rooms Excellent Room Service
FINE FOODS-.BEER and WIN~E

Jesse
Qn

Holmes Will Speak
Science InReligion

TRANSPORTATION
H. B. GODFREY
MOVING - STORAGE - PACKING
Local and Long Distance Moving.
410 N. Fourth Ave. Phone 6297
29c
a
HELP WANTED t
WANTED-A cook for week-ends for
family, of adults. Either man or
woman. Call 2-2916. 348 r
YOUNG WOMAN WANTED-To op-
erate rental library. Local Univer-|
sity graduate, under 30 preferred. I
Apply at Follett's Michigan Book
Store between 9 and 11 a.m. 345 S
WANTED TO RENT -6 Q
ROOMS WANTED for high school
girls for nights of May 1 and 2 at
756 per night per girl---Phone 4121,
Extension 485 or mail card to 213
Haven Hall. 346
WANTED TO BUY--4
CASH for used clothing; men and
ladies. Claude H. Brown, 512 S
Main St. Phone 2-2736. 31:
WANTED - ANY OLD OR NEW
CLOTHING, PAY FROM $5.00 to
$500 FOR SUITS, OVERCOATS.
TYPEWRITERS, FURS - PER-
SIANS. MINKS. PHONE ANN AR-
BOR 6304 for APPOINTMENTS.
SAM.
TYPING
TYPING -Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 K. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. Ile
VLA STEIN -Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone' 6.27. 706 Oakland.
MISCELLANEOUS
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing
Brumfield & Brumfield, . 308 8.
State. 19 C
BEN THE TAILOR pays the best
price for used clothes. 122 E.
Washington. l
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL----
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 5c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St., Phone 3916. 10c
STUDENT BUNDLES-3 shirts, 3
pairs of sox, 6 handkerchiefs fin-
ished, 2 suits underwear, 2 bath
towels, 1 pajama suit fluffed-99c.
Ace Hand Laundry, 1114 S. Uni-
versity. 15c
FOR RENT
SUITE with private bath and shower.
Also lovely double room with ad-
joining lavatory. Available now,
summer school, or September.
Phone 8544-422 E. Washington.
342
EXCHANG-Use of furnished cot-
tage on the St. Clair River at Al-

"Can Religion Be Scientific?" will
be the topic of a lecture to be de-
livered at 4:15 p.m. Monday at Lane
Hall by Dr. Jesse H. Holmes, Professor
Emeritus of Philosophy and Religion
at Swarthmore College, under the

sponsorship of the Ann Arbor Meet- Campus?" today and
ing of the Religious Society of Friends Dexter.
and the Student Religious Associa- The University's cha
tion. to the other chapters, it
Doctor Holmes will also speak at an of Michigan State, W
informal luncheon at 12:15 p.m. Mon- Teachers College and
day at Lane Hall, and at the regular!chapters from Wayn
meeting of the Fellowship of Recon- CenrasState Teachers
ciliation at 7 p.m.
Dr. Holmes is a graduate of John Michigan Normal.
Hopkins University, and had taught Among the speaker
at Swarthmore for 34 years prior to Knight of Michigan Stat
his retirement in 1934. He has served Kent Schaeffer, ofthe
as president of the National Federa- pha Phi Omega office,
tion of Religious Liberals, and in 1938 O. Case. of the Unive
ran for governor of Pennsylvania on of the local chapter..
the Socialist ticket. 'were made by Irving

tomorrow at
apter is host
ncluding those
Arestern State
d prospective
e University,
' College and
!s are Prof.
.e College, Mr.
national Al-
and Dr. Lee
ersity, adviser
Arrangements
Schoel, '42E.

126 East Huron

Phone 4241

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CHURCH
DIRECTORY

An Overture to Summer Styles

Composer:

I
III
'
!
d6

George Gershwin

Conductor: Jack Rue
Lyrics: Visualized in Fashions
from Ann Arbor's Men's and
Women's Clothing Stores.
Presented by the Michigan Daily
Michigan Theatre

t0
Ry i.: '1} i

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector
The Rev. Frederick W. Leech, Assistant Min.
George Faxon, Organist and Choirmaster
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:30 A.M. High School Class, Harris Hall.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon by the
Rev. Henry Lewis.
11:00 A.M. Junior Church.
11:00 A.M. Kindergarten, Harris Hall.
8:00 P.M. College Work Program, Harris 1all.
Installation of Officers' and Cabinet and re-
di edication of Bishop Williams Memorial
Chapel,
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL CHURCH
South Fourth Avenue.
Tic'odore &unale, Pastor.
9:00 A.M. Service in the German Language.
9:30 A.M. Church School.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship. Sermon topic: "By
the Grace of God".
6:00 P.M. Student Guild supper and discussion
hour.
6:15 P.M. Young People's League. Welcome sup-
per for the Confirmation Class. Speaker:
Victor Schoen.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 South Division Street
10:30 A.M. Sunday Service.
11:45 A.M. Sunday School.
Free reading room at 206 E. Liberty St. open
daily except Sundays and holidays from 11:30
A.M. to 5 P.M. and on Saturdays till 9 P.M.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw---Dial 2-4466
William P. Lemon, D.D., Minister
Lillian Dilts, Assistant
William Barnard, Director of Music
9:30 A.M. Church School. Classes for all age
groups.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship. "A World Riddle"
is the subject of sermon by Dr. Lemon.
10:45 A.M. Nursery during morning worship.
600 P.M. Westminister Guild - supper at 6:00
-_ i...., -. 7 nn A m Ph . Pmn Pn~~

E FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

9:30 A.M. Student Class: Dr. George E. Car-
others, leader.
10:40 A.M. Church School for Nursery, Begin-
ners, and Primary Departments. Parents may
leave children there while attending Church.
10:40 A.M. Morning Worship. Dr. Brashares'
subject is "Seeing the World."
6:00 P.M. Wesleyan Guild. Theme for consid-
eration: China. Food and Fellowship folloW -
ing the meeting.
THE LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Sponsored jointly by
Zion and Trinity Lutheran Churches.
Zion Lutheran Church,
E. Washington St. at S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 A.M. Church Worship Service. Sermon
"The Risen Shepherd" by Mr. Roland Wied-
eranders.
Trinity Lutheran Church,
E. William St. at S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 A.M. Church Worship Service. Sermon
"The True and Tested Leadership" by Rev.
Henry 0. Yoder.
Lutheran Student Association,
Zion Lutheran Parish Hall.

State and Williams Sts.
Dr. Leonard A. Parr, Minister.
Willis B. Hunting.
Director of Student Activities,
Director of Music, Mrs. Mary
bins.

McCall Stub-

9:30 A.M. Junior and Intermediate departments
of Church School.
10:30 A.M. Primary and Kindergarten depart-
ments of Church School.
10:45 A.M. Services of Public Worship. Dr. Parr
will preach on the subject, "The Sin of Ac-
cidia."
5:30 P.M. Ariston League High School group
will meet for a potluck supper at Pilgrim
Hall.
7:00 P.M. Student Fellowship will hold a joint
meeting with the Ypsilanti group in Pilgrim
Hall. Miss Esther Ewell, state director from
East Lansing, will lead a discussion on "The
Tie That Binds."
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State St. between. Washington and Huron.
Ministers: Charles W. Brashares, and
J. Edward Lantz.
Music: Hardin Van Deursen, director; Mary
Eleanor Porter, organist.

Thursday, May 1

at 4:15

No Admission Charge

i

i

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