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April 24, 1941 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PACE EIGHT
Dur. J. Priestley
Will Address
MedicalGrou
'Cancer Of The Stomach'
To Be Discussion Topic
Of Annual Mayo Talk
"Cancer of the Stomach" will be
discussed by Dr. James Taggart
Priestley, assistant'professor of sur-
gery at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester,
Minn., in the annual Dr. William J.
Mayo lecture at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow
in the second floor amphitheatre of
the University Hospital.
Dr. Priestley's talk is expected to
deal with the end results of surgical
treatment' vxhich is given to cancer
sufferers.
Juniors and seniors in the School
of Medicine will be excused from
classes to attend this lecture.
An authority on abdominal and
urological surgery at the Mayo Clinic,
Dr. Priestley is a member of the
American College of Surgeons ad
the Central Surgical Association. He
graduated from the University of
Pennsylvania School of Medicine in
1926.
The Mayo Lectureships in Surgery
was established in 1924. At that time
a fund was set aside to endow an
annual lecture or series of lectures
on some subject related to surgery.
Because the income from the fund
is still small, the Mayo Clinic has
furnished the speakers for this lec-
tureship during recent years.
Aeronautical Group
Will Discuss Trips
Plans for the trip to the Stout En-
gineering Laboratories, the Stinson
factory and Wayne County Airport
will be discussed at a meeting of the
Institute of Aeronautical Sciences at
8 p.m. today in Room 1042 East En-
gineering Building, Leslie J. Trigg,
'41E, president, announced yester-
day.-
The trip to Chanute Field, Illinois,
and the. coming banquet will also be
discussed. Five subscriptions to the
Intitute Aeronautical Review will be
drawn for.
Forestry School To Hold
Annual Picnic Tomorrow
The School of Forestry and Conser-
vation will hold a picnic from 3:30
to 9:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Sagi-
naw Forest, several miles west of
Ann Arbor. In-order that all may at-
tend, trucks will leave from the Na-
tural Science Building at 3:30 p.m.,
4:30 p.m., 5:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Supper will be sered in the open,
and zinging and games will consti-
tute 'the entertainment program.

T MHE M I CHIG/N DAYLY TURSY, APRIL 24, 1941

Professor Hobbs Refutes
Statement Of Lindbergh

ASSOCIATED
war-
P 0 C om ow
II V RE

PRESS

Sharp issue with a recent state-
ment by Charles A. Lindbergh mini-
mizing the utility-of Greenland-now
a United States protectorate-for
naval and air bases was made last
week by Prof. Emeritus William H.
Hobbs of the University, an inter-
nationally recognized authority on
that northerly island.
A geologist and the leader of three
expeditions to Greenland, Professor
Hobbs rebuked the famous aviator,
recalling that under his leadership
"an excellent landing field" had been
constructed in "west Greenland which
might have been, and now could be.
made miles in length and at least a
half mile in width with a perfect level
floor of hard clay."
Lindbergh, who has made a Green-
land flight for Pan American Airways,
had asserted that "Greenland's to-
pography and climate made the island
unusable as an air or naval spring-
board for an invasion of North Ameri-
ca from Europe," and, "flying condi-
tions in Greenland would be among
the most difficult in the world and
that naval operations would be handi-
apped because of ice."
Hobbs Scores Lindbergh
Hobbs took issue with the flier on
all points, and said that "if Lind-
bergh were better informed'and were
interested to promote rather than
obstruct the defense of this hemi-
sphere, he could have told the coun-
try what experience has shown, that
the climate of Greenland is on the
whole not unfavorable for flying, and
that the topography in some sec-
tions of the coast land (fortunately
in the strategic ones) is well adapt-
ed for both naval and air bases."
On the basis of his geological train-
ing and.actual experience in Alaska,
Professor Hobbs stated his refuta-
tion of Lindbergh's position thus:
"In the year 1930-31 seaplanes of
the British expedition to east Green-
land flew over wide areas of the coast
and also the inland ice throughout
every month of the year and without
a single major accident. For years
the Danish government has with suc-4
cess employed seaplanes for mapping3
the coastland of this great island ex-
tending well into the hinterland, both
on the west and in the remote north-
east.
"This certainly could not have been
done if flying conditions were so un-
favorable as is asserted by Colonel,
Lindbergh.
Suitable Areas Available
"There are moreover a number of
areas suitable for landing fields for
planes with wheel undercarriages andI
in 1929 I myself prepared an ex-i
cellent field of this type. Anne Lind-i
bergh's book shows) that Lindberghl

flew over this very field and so must
have seen it.
"As regards the climate of Green-
land it is almost without fog---20
foggy days a year within the most
strategic area-and though the storm
winds are both frequent and fierce,
they clear the winter snow off the
landing fields.
"The handicap' of ice in reaching
Greenland applies especially to the
-ast coast (which Lindbergh has seen)
out within the strategic area of south
Greenland 'the ports remain open
throughout the year.
Germans Established Stations
"The Colonel tells us that Green-
land is 'unusable as a springboard for
in invasion of North America from
Europe,' yet the Germans in 1929-30
nd 1930-31' established stations in
Greenland and subsequently a 'film-
ing' expedition there, under one of
1-Iitler's friends, carefully looked up
the best landing fields and saw to it
that the Danes at once carried out
weather observations on each of these
fields for several years."
As reported in an editorial of the
Chicago Daily News entitled, "Hobbs
vs. Lindbergh," the majority of both
interventionists and isolationists are
"delighted with the Greenland acqui-
sition as a protectorate." Hobbs.
himself, conceives of Greenland as
a 1*-lfway point "to the British Isles
within American waters," from which
"both planes and destroyers based on
south Greenland can play a large
role in running down German raiders
of all types, and from which cargoess
bound for Britain can proceed."
Prof essor Brown
Attends Conclave
Prof. G. G. Brown of the chemical
and metallurgical engineering depart-
ment will be im, Dallas, Tex., today
and tomorrow for meetings of a con-
vention of the Natural Gasoline Asso-
ciation, Prof. A. H. White, chairman
of the department, announced yes-
terday.
Although he is not presenting a
personal paper at the meeting, Pro-
fessor Brown has been asked to head
a discussion on "Hydrates of Natural
Gas," and will act in this capacity.
The convention started yesterday and
will run through Friday.
Union Employs Students
Forty five university students are
regularly employed in the Main Din-
ing Room of the Michigan Union
in addition to several times that num-
ber in other parts of the Union.

WALL STREET-Robert
L. Stott (above), 41, has been
nominated for chairmanship of
New York stock exchange board,
the election scheduled for May
12. This board will choose an
exchange president to succeed
Wm. McChesney Martin, drafted.

WHAT MAKES A k M Y WHEELS GO 'ROUND-Pa, ma, and brothers galore
grabbed the chance to see an army from the inside when "open house" was held at Camp Shelby,
Mississippi. This is the look-see parade past demonstration tents and some guns.

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

TRANSPORTATION
H. B. GODFREY
MOVING - STORAGE - PACKING
Local and Long Distance Moving.
410 N. Fourth. Ave. Phone 6297
29c
HELP WANTED
TWO WEEKS part-time trial period
leading to full time summer work.
Apply Room 302 Mich. Union, 3-5
Wednesday. 341
WANTED TO BUY- 4
WANTED - ANY OLD OR NEW
CLOTHING, PAY FROM $5.00 to
$500 FOR SUITS, OVERCOATS,
TYPEWRITERS, FURS - PER-
SIANS, MINKS. PHONE ANN AR-
BOR 6304 for APPOINTMENTS.
SAM.
TYPING
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. l'c
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
MISCELLANEOUS
THESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. 19c
BEN THE TAILOR pays the best
price for used clothes. 122 E.
Washington. 1c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 5c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-

C H E R 0 K E E D A M M A K E S H E A D W A Y--Eight months after construction work began, the Tennessee Valley Authority's
Cherokee dam near Knoxville, Tenn., looked like this. In the background is the site of the dam itself, and the bridge in the forpground
was, built to permit swift, uninterrupted movement of heavy loads of rock. The four penstocks of the powerhouse are already in position.
The Cherokee will dam the Holston river, form a part of the vast water control system operating in the Tennessee valley

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