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April 24, 1941 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-04-24

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THURSDAY, APRIL 24, 1941

T 14 F Ml C H lr . C AIV Yk A l TV

RTTI L' M ICIT1Ca E1 N TIA1 1 X

PAGE SEVEN

i

Trackmen Leave

For

Drake

Relays,

Netters For Chicago

don wirtehafter's
DAILY DOUBLE

Dis And Dat...
DON'T BELIEVE the silly headline
that appeared in several of the
metropolitan papers yesterday . . .
"DAILY DOUBLE pays off $3,610.80
on West Coast" . . . There's abso-
lutely no truth to the matter, dearl
patient creditors . . . Father and
Mother Double, two brothers and
rich Uncle back in Owosso haven't
got that much together . . . Norman
Sper, grid expert par excellence, was
in town yesterday with two Holly-
wood photographers taking pictures
of the Wolverine spring training . .
It's all a part of Producer Boris Mor-
ris's nation-wide stunt to predict
football tames via the cinema next
autumn . . . Sper, who will do the
prognos icating, says that Texas with'
Jack Grain and Pete Layden appears
the most powerful of all the teams
he has seen so far this year, and
there have been many . . . He is the
gent that correctly predicted the
Rose Bowl choices in September two
years ago.
HATS OFF to the Harvard Cor-
poration for its "no racial dis-
crimination" stand against the

Navy. ,. It seems strange that Mid-
die authorities refused to have their
lads play A against Lucian Alexis,
Jr., Crimson Negro lacrosse player,
while Army had no objections when
it met the Harvard team just a
week later . . . Fielding Yost cele-
brates his 70th birthday next Wed-
nesday . . . Rumors have it that
Joe Louis will quit the ring to join
the army in the fall . . With
bouts against Buddy Baer, Billy
Conn, Abe Simon and Lou Nova
still obi the Brown Bomber's sched-
ule, the stories say that if he wins
all four, it will be farewell to
gloves for the champion.
Campbell Kane, the Hoosier Hot-
shot who took the Michigan AAU
mile race in stride here a short time
back, has enlisted and will report to
the Naval Reserve aviation base at
Robertson, Mo., when school ends in
June . . . Perry Kimmerer, Michi-
gan's best javelin thrower, recently
injured his right shoulder and will
be out of competition for some time.
BASEBALL SEASON slid up on
the Double so fast that we
haven't had a chance to give you
our red-hot selections for the com-
ing year . . . Better late than nev-
er (perhaps), here they are .
In the American League: Cleve-
land, with pitch-stolen Rabid
Robert Feller, should overcome the
Yankee millions for its first pen-
nant since 1920 . . . Special note
to all Tiger fans-My mailbox shall
be open to all of your good wishes
for I frankly can't see how Detroit
can wind up any better than
fourth, if that high.
IN THE NATIONAL LEAGUE-An
all-Ohio series is in the making. The
Reds will come through again with
St. Louis, Brooklyn and Pittsburghl
bringing up the rear.gT

Titles At Stake
At Des Moines
CinderClassic
Mile And Two-Mile Relay
Crowns To Be Risked.
By Doherty's Thinclads
By HAL WILSON
Primed to pit their strength against
the cream of Midwestern and South-
western cinder talent, 21 Wolverine
trackmen entrain at 8:17 a.m. today
for the t famed Drake Relay carnival
at Des Moines, Ia., tomorrow and
Saturday.
Six r flay teams and individuals
in anpother half dozen events will
carry/Michigan's bid for meet honors.
Defending champions in the mile
and two-mile relays, Coach Ken Do-
herty's lads will form powerful com-
binations in both of these events in
addition to a crack sprint medley,
distance medley, 880-yard, and four-
mile relay quartets.
Canham Will Defend Crown
In the individual events Capt. Don
Canham will make an attempt to
defend his Drake Relay crown, with
teammate Wes Allen sharing the
leaping burden.
Sprinters Bud Piel and Chuck Don-
ahey'will see action in the 100-yard
dash in addition to pairing with Bob
Rputter and Al Thomas in the 880-
yard relay. Sophomore Frank Mc-
Carthy will double up in the broad
jump and high hurdles, while Karl
Wisner is slated to run the two-mile.
Big Bob Hook will face the nation's
best shotputter, husky Al Blozis, in
his specialty, and then compete in
the discus throw. In his initial var-
sity appearance, sophomore John
Wise will toss the javelin.
Wolverines Favored
Favored slightly to repeat last
year's victory, the slightly-altered
Wolverine mile team of Thomas,
Bob Barnard, Jack Leutritz and Bob
Ufer will face strong competition
while Michigan's two-mile quartet,
Dave Matthews, Jack Dobson, Johnny
Kautz and Warren Breidenbach, also
is rated a fairly good bet to repeat,
although strong opposition is ex-
pected from Texas' Longhorns.
The Lone Star entry in the sprint
medley relay is heavily, favored to
dop its event, but Michigan's lineup I
of Leutritz, Thomas, Piel and Breid-
enbach also looks good on paper. Bill
Ackerman, John Purdue and Herb
Leake will do double duty on the four-
mile and distance medley relays, with
Wisner filling in the fourth berth in
the former event and Bill Dobson in
the latter.

Golfers Frolic
After Flashing
Form In Wins
LYONS HOWLAND
Some jottings from the golfers'
SSouthern trip diary:
Admiration has come from many
quarters at the fine showing of Mich-
igan's inexperienced golf team
against their many veteran oppon-
ents. especially since their competi-
tors had much more practice in the
balmy southern sun while the Wol-
verines were still working out in the
driving nets down in the Sports
Building. The squad ended up their
spring trip with three wins out of
four rmatches.
Michigan's golfers have many times
expressed their gratitude for the fine
hospitality which they received from
the deep south, especially Captain
Fred Dannenfelser and Dave Osler,
who, Bob Fife says, "felt specially
honored at their reception by Knox-
ville dates."
Hightlight was the play of Dannen-
felser and Ben Smith against Ohio
State's Big Ten Champion Gilbert,
whom they both outplayed by four
strokes.
Humorous note was struck by
Coach Courtright and his inadvertant
delight when the Wolverines defeat-
ed Ohio State's Buckeyes. Courtright
says that the Ohioans had wanted to
sew up the Michigan match rather
than do anything else.
The golfers also expressed their
gratitude to the Michigan alumni in
Atlanta, who fixed up a big banquet.
The group was headed by Bob Snod-
grass, '25Law.
Interfraternity Baseball
Large scores and hard hitting char-
acterized the baseball games in the
fraternity division on the second day
of Intramural play.
Results of the ganes were Theta
Xi 20, Sigma Alpha Mu 7; Phi Lamb-
da Phi 7, Chi Psi 1; Chi Phi 7, Phi
Kappa Sigma 1; Alpha Kappa Lamb-
da 15, Acacia 11; Kappa Nu 19, Kap-
pa Delta Rho 1; Alpha Sigma Phi 15,<
Sigma Phi 10; Phi Epsilon Pi 12,1
Kappa Sigma 11.t

Tennis Squad I
To Play Twice
In Windy Cityj
Meet Maroons In Big Ten
Opener Friday, Face
Wisconsin On Saturday
By DICK SIMON
With five victories already tucked
away in their bonnets, the Wolverine
tennis team will depart this afternoon
for Chicago where they will meet
the Maroons on Friday and Wisconsin
on Saturday in their first Conference
battles.
Coach Leroy Weir is taking a sev-
en-man team in hopes of bringing
back two more triumphs. Along with
Captain Jim Tobin will be Lawton
Hammett, Jim Porter, Wayne Stille,
Torn Gamon, Alden Johnson, and
Howie Bacon. Johnson will play in
the sixth singles spot while Bacon
will team with Gamon to form the
last doubles combination. The make-
up of the rest of the squad will be
the same that played during the
southern tour.
While the netters ale on the road
Chicago will be opening its season
with Wisconsin. Last year the Badgers
were Chicago's country cousins as
they were the only team the Maroons
whitewashed. The Wolverines licked
the Windy City racketeers last season,
5-4, but did not tangle with the
lads from Madison.
Yesterday afternoon was only the
second time the Michigan squad had
a chance to practice on their home1
courts. The weather was threateninga
all afternoon, but that didn't stop the
Weirmen from getting a good last
minute tune-up.
Weir said he didn't know what to
expect from Chicago, but Calvin Saw-
yier, a junior, was the number three
bracket champion in the Big Tenj
last year. He will probably play
against Tobin in the number onet
spot. Another junior, Bob Lifton, was
runner-up to the number five bracket
champion also last season, and will
likely face Porter in the number}
three position.

By MYRON DANN
A casual observer at yesterday's
varsity baseball practice might have
wondered who was the rather prom-
ising pitcher hurling for the regulars.
But the diamond wise fan knew that
it was none other than Coach Ray
Fisher, who assumed this new role
as a last resort to bolster his pitch-
ing staff. Most local dopesters think
that Ray would start. most of the
games this year if college rules per-
mitted coaches to play ball.
In discussing the reasons for Michi-
gan's 6-2 defeat at the hands of the
Notre Dame nine, Ray stated them
briefly and to the point, "They had
good pitching and we didn't. Our
pitchers walked eight men and gave
eight hits. Of the three pitchers I
used not one really seemed to have
the stuff. The opposing pitcher gave
us only three hits, which is good
enough for any ball-team."
Pleased With Fielding
The only thing that probably
brought smiles to the baseball men-
tor's face was the fielding perform-
ance of his team. The infield turned
in some fine defensive plays and
lanky Dick Wakefield's catch in deep
right center in the first inning was
one for the books. The few misplays
that the Wolverines did make, how-
Yearling Pete Wege
Sets, javelin Mar
Dust of 17 years was disturbed on
the freshman javelin record files at
the Yost Field House yesterday after-
noon after Pete Wege hurled the met-
al-tipped stick 192 feet, 1 inch, for
a new all-time frosh mark.
The record surpasses the toss of
189 feet, 114 inches, made by Phil
Northrop as a yearling in 1924. For
nearly a score of years Northrop's
record withstood the attempts of
Wolverine frosh thinclads. However,
Coach Chester Stackhouse predicted
early last fall that the mark would
fall this season. The Varsity record
is 207 feet, 7 5/8 inches, also held
by Northrop.
LACROSSE CLUB NOTICE
All those interested in playing
lacrossehshould reportdfor practice
at 3 p.m. at South Ferry Field.
Practice sessions are held every
day. Intra-squad games will be
scheduled later.

Coach Fisher Blames Pitching
For Defeat At Hands Of Irish

ever, proved very costly. Just after
Wakefield collided with Capt. Bill
Steppon in going after an easy foul
fly, two runs crossed home plate and
when Mike Sofiak, scrapping little
shortstop, dropped a toss from Step-
pon another run was given as a gift
to the visitors from South Bend.
Stoddard To Face Maroons
Things fail to look any Drighter as
far as Paul Goldsmith's arm is con-
cerned. The ex-hockey player has
been troubled by an ailing wing since
early in March, and despite practice
is still not ready to take his regular
turn on the mound.
Fisher probably will start veteran
Maynard Stoddard in the Conference
opener here against Chicago Friday
afternoon
FINA L
TOPCOAT SALE

FORDHAM UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW
NEW YORK
Case System
Three-Year Day Course
Four-Year Evening Course
Co-educational
Memblr of theaAssociation of American
Law Schools
College Degree or Two Years of
College Work with Good Grades
Required for Entrance
Transcript of Record Must Be Furnished
Morning, Early Afternoo8 and
Evening Classes
For further information address
Registrar of Fordham Law School
233 Broadway, New York
I

The finest spring
'round, serviceable
verts, Gabardines,
$21.75 Values ..,
$19.75 Values . .

values in all-
topcoats. Co-
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. now $17.40
. now $15.80

I
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":II
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DISTINVCTIVELY

STVLED

for Springj
. . 8.50 to 18.00
. . 6.00to10.00
3.50 to 7.50
. . 2.50 to 5.00

Wear

Sport Coats .
Odd Trousers
Loafer Coats .
Sweaters .

w
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it

Major L
AMERLICAN LEAGUE

R

Boston..........
Cleveland ...........
New York ..........
Chicago ............
St. Louis ...........
Philadelphia.......
Detroit...........
Washington.......

W L
5 3
5 3
6 4
3 3
2 2
4 5
2 4
3 6

Pet.
.625
.625
.600
.500
.500
.444
.333
.333

New York ..........
St. Louis ..........
Brooklyn ..........
Chicago ............
Cincinnati .........
Boston.............
Pittsburgh........
Philadelphia ..... . ..
Wednesday's

ea gue Standings

NATIONAL LEAGUE

W L
7 2
5 2
6 4
3 3
4 4
4 6
2 5
2 7
Results

Pet,
.778
.714
.600
.500
.500
.400
.286
.222

Jacket & Windbreakers 3.50 to 5.00
Suede Jackets . . 8.50 and up
Stetson and La Salle HATS
All Types of SPORTS CLOTHES'
...at ...

Sailing Club Holds
Annual Fraternity
RegattaSaturdayl
The Michigan Sailing Club, one of
the classiest outfits in the Mid-West,
opened its 1941 season last weekend
at the semi-annual Mid-West Inter-
collegiate Regatta in Chicago and
thereby launched a full schedule of
racing.
Due to the bad weather, and high
seas, an official winner was not chos-
en for the Grant Park meet, but it
will be run off later in the year, the
officials announced.
Two powerful Wolverine teams will
journey to Brown University for the
Invitational Regatta there this week-
end, while another crew will handle
the interfraternity regatta on the
Michigan team's iznne course at Lake
Whitmore.
Last year's. fraternity meet drew
,.a many entries that five had to be
refused admission and indications are
that this Saturday's regatta will equal
the 1940 record.

IT'S

Wednesday's Results
Detroit 13, Chicago 5
New York 4, Boston 2 (11 in.)
Philadelphia 11, Washington 7
Cleveland 5, St. Louis 2
Thursday's Games
St. Louis at Detroit
Cleveland at Chicago
Washington at Philadelphia
Boston at New York

KUOHN'S
CLOTHES SHOP
122 E. LIBERTY
on the corner next to P. Bell

A

New York 5, Boston 4
Brooklyn 4, Philadelphia 0
Cincinnati 5, Chicago 0
St. Louis 3, Pittsburgh 1
Thursday's Games
Chicago at Pittsburgh
New York at Boston
Philadelphia At Brooklyn
Cincinnati at St. Louis.

PA LII

BEACH

F
i

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..._. i
t
E
i
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i
t
R

STADEL & WALKER
FIRsT NATIONAL BUILDING

NOW-Every Bottle
FOR QUALITY
PROTECTION
THIS PFEIFFER'S. REGIST ERED
NUMBER GU ARDS T HE UNIFORM
+ ESS AND M ELLW r
TffA1RSFPFEIFFER 'S8E
In order to assure the unvarying high quality and pur-/
ity of Pfeifer's Beer-to guard that mellow flavor 7
brewed from choicest barley and the blossom of the
hop-Pfeiffer Brewing Company now registers each
bottle of this mellow Michigan brew. So next time be
wise-say Pfeiffer's-and look for the registered num- .* :

the national fashion for day and
evening wear. Mix the coat with
odd slacks for sports. Wear the
Olacks with odd jacket for vari-
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the easy-feeling lounge models

at your clothier. Pastels
and deep tones, too ...

$1

775~

4% T A*
up

Palm Beach Evening Formals (white
jacket and black trousers), $20. Palm
Beach Slacks, $5.50.And by the same
makers-the new Goodall Tropic
Weight-top value in lightweight

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