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April 23, 1941 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-04-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

WEM DNISDAYAPRIL 23,1941

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA&GE THRE

Michigan Nine Bows To Notre Dame In Home Open

er,6-2

C>

Gridiron Trio
May Be Lost
To Uncle Sam.

Fate Worries Crisler

By NORM MILLER
Like . the king of old mythology
whose daily existence was jeopardized
by the perilous sword of Damocles
Coach Fritz Crisler goes about these
days in apprehension of another men-
ace - Uncle Sam's draft.
'And with good reason, too. The om-
nivorous armed forces have already
swallowed up one of his 1940 letter-
men, are almost certain to grab off
another, and threaten to rob Michi-
gan's gridiron ranks of two more stal-
warts.
Butler Enlisted
Tackle Jack Butler was the first
gridder who was forced to forego his
football career for military exigen-
cids. Butler, tagged with a low draft
number, has enlisted in the naval air
force and will be doing his playing
with bombers instead of footballs this
fall.
Harlin Fraumann, veteran end who
was being counted on to fill a regular
berth in the sorely depleted end ranks,
has a local order number around 150,
and in all probability will do all his
cavorting with a gun on his shoulder
come fall.
Tackles Reuben Kelto, alias num-
ber 315 to his draft board, and big
Bob Flora, with 509 tag, may also
find it necessary to embark upon a
military career. There is a slight poss-
ibility that each may be deferred,
however. Kelto may be given fur-
ther deferrment to finish his engin-
eering course, while Flora may like-
wise be afforded an opportunity to
continue school until February, at
which time he is slated to receive his
degree.
Ingalls, Rogers Registered
Center Bob Ingalls and end Joe
Rogers are the only other lettermen
who registered in the draft last fall,
but both appear safe for awhile. In-
galls, whose number is 1733, will prob-
ably be exempted for poor eye-sight,
while Rogers' 3554 number appears
high enough to continue his school-
ing unmolested.
Major League
Standings j
AMERICAN LEAGUE

W L
Boston.............5 2
St. Louis......I....2 1
Chicago............3 2
Cleveland...........4 3
New York .......... 5 4
Philadelphia.......3 5
Washington.........3 5
Detroit............. 1 4
Tuesday's Results
Chicago 6, Detroit 3.
St. Louis 6, Cleveland 3.
Philadelphia 6, New York
Washington 12, Boston 5.
Wednesday's Games
Chicago at Detroit
St. Louis at Cleveland

Pct.
.714
.667
.600
.571
.556
.375
.375
.200
5. '

*Reuben Kelto, giant tackle from
Bessemer, was expected by Coach
Fritz Crislerfto be one of the main-
stays of the line this fall, but a
low draft number may cause him
to be wearing a different uniform
than shown above when the grid
season next arrives.,
Three Netters
Fioht For Last
Spot On Squad
By ART HILL
"The weather was fine." That was
Coach Leroy Weir's sonly positive
statement about' the Southern trip
completed last Saturday by his Var-
sity tennis squad.
Asked for a comment on the trip,
the young net mentor responded with
the above brief discourse on the state
of the Dixie atmosphere but said
nothing conclusive about the import-
ant question of the number six singles
spot on his team.
The three aspirants for the job,
Howie Bacon, Alden Johnson.and
Jim Bourquin all made the' trip and
each played two matches. Bacon won
both his contests, Johnson split a
pair and Bourquin dropped two.
Weir Hasn't Decided
"I still haven't decided though,"
Coach Weir said yesterday. "All three
of the boys showed flashes of good
tennis and it's a toss-up which one
will open the season at number six
for us against Chicago this week-
end." The three players will probably
meet in the intra-squad matches dur-
ing the week which should have some
bearing on the eventual choice.
One question mark has been elim-
inated, however, since Weir has pret-
ty definitely decided on the make-up
of his third doubles team for the
Conference campaign. Howie Bacon
and Tom Gamonr who teamed
together quite successfully on the
vacation jaunt, will likely play on
the number three combination.
Star Doubles Duo
Brightest spot on the Michigan ten-
nis horizon looks to be the first dou-
bles duo of Capt. Jim Tobin and
Lawton Hammett. This pair was un-
defeated during the trip arni gives
promise of being one of the best in
the Big Ten. Hammett's great net
play is a perfect complement to To-
bin's all-around brilliance. The pair
will be hard to stop.
The Wolverine captain's singles
play is also worthy of comment. He
displayed some brilliant tennis in
holding Duke's Don Buffington to a
6-4, 7-5 victory. Buffington is ranked
among the first twenty amateur play-
ers in the nation.
Coach Weir was expecting excel-
lent tennis from Tobin and Ham-
mett but he was pleasantly surprised
by the fine showing of Jim Porter,
Wayne Stille and Tom Gamon, who
played in the three, four and five
spots respectively.

Linksmen Cop
Three Of Four
Tilts In South
By LYONS HOWLAND
Michigan's golfers almost con-
tinued a perfect dual meet record
started by last year's team as they
completed a successful spring train-
ing schedule, winningthree and los-
ing one.
The Wolverines arrived in Ann
Arbor last Monday after a tour of
the South which included a series
of matches with Georgia Tech,
Georgia, Tennessee and Ohio State.
Coach Ray Courtright and his men
left the day before spring recess and
headed in the direction of Atlanta,
Ga., where the Wolverines took on
Georgia Tech on April 14. The squad
had two days to shoot some practice
rounds to get acquainted with the
greens which were much faster than
the ones at home.
Smith Paces Wolverines
Ben Smith paced the Wolverines
to their first victory of the season,
the squad overcoming the "Ramblin'
Wrecks" by a 16 to 5 score. Ben
took individual scoring honors for
the day, carding 37 for the first nine
and 31 on the last nine.
Before leaving Atlanta the team
attended a meeting of Michigan
alumni in Atlanta at which the guest
of honor was Charles Yates, British
Open Champion.
Coach Courtright took his men on
to Athens, Ga., where the squad was
scheduled to meet the University of
Georgia on April 16. In spite of some
stellar play on the part of Capt. Fred
Dannenfelser and Ben Smith, Michi-
gan lost to this year's Southern In-
tercollegiate champions, 17 to 4.
The squad left Athens after its
first dual meet defeat in two sea-
sons to lock clubs with the University
of Tennessee on April 18 at Knox-
ville where Michigan trounced the
Volunteers 17?/2 to 31/2. Ben Smith
again took high honors, carding a
par 74.
Ohio State Beaten
The golf team then turned north-
ward on the home trek to meet its
arch-competitor, Ohio State. Court-
right says the Buckeyes were really
gunning for Michigan this year after
looking over the very few veterans
on this year's Wolverine roster. But
it seems that the Buckeyes were in
the bad luck for Michigan's green
team went out and proceeded to de-
feat the all-veteran Ohioans, 14 told.
Both Capt. Fred Dannenfelser ani
Ben Smith outscored Gilbert, Ohio
State's Conference Champion with
their carded 75. Gilbert pulled down
a 79.
Coach Courtright is satisfied with
the team's showing, but hastens to
add that it has a long way to go to
be a top-notch squad. "I consider
Ben Smith as a likely successor to
the records of Michigan's all-time
golf greats, Johnny Fisher and Chuck
Kocsis, if he works hard."

Irish Pitcher
Holds Varsity
To Three Hits
Harms Gets Two Singles,
Ruehle One; Rambler
Captain Is Star Of Tilt
(Continued from Page 1)
Davey scampered to third and then
continued across the plate when Far-'
rell threw the ball over Pinelli's head.
Notre Dame went ahead again in
the third, a lead they never lost, when
they put together two singles, a pair
of walks and two outfield flies for
two runs. Michigan's last threat came
in the fourth when sophomore Dick
Wakefield and George Ruehle walked
and Harms, who collected two of the
home club's three singles, singled
Wakefield home.
Wakefield, in his first appearance
before the home fans, turned in the
fielding gem of the day in the first
with a one-handed stab of John Tal-
lett's fly to right center.

By HAL WILSON
CINDERS FROM THE CINDER-
PATHS: - Vic Reed, father of the
press releases which emanate from
the Athletic Publicity Office from
time to time, dashed off a little piece
about Johnny Kautz, junior half-mil-
er, last week .,. . almost immediately
the tale received printers' ink in the
Ohio State Lantern and half a dozen
other dailies.
Johnny, it seems, was taking part
in a high school indoor track meet
. because of cramped facilities,
the distance races had to be run
through the school corridors, over a
course laid out in the form of a
square, with signs marking the turns
. unfamiliar with the course, John-
ny swears that he missed the sign
for one of the turns - and wound
up in the men's rest room at the
end of the hall . . . p.s. - he lost
the race.
Big Al Blozis, Georgetown's ace,
shot putter who is threatening to
shatter Jack Torrance's world
mark, has passed up the East's
Penn Relays in order to compete

in Iowa's Drake Relays . . . Coach
Ken Doherty has entered a Wolv-
erine squad in the colorful two-
day carnival, Friday and Saturday
... Ken thinks his mile and two-
mile quartets will make a strong
showing.
Indiana's husky Archie Harris
tensed his mighty frame at the Kan-
sas Relays last week and cut loose
with a tremendous discus throw . .
it fell less -than a yard short of the
world's record . . . Ohio State's pow-
erful Buckeye crew surprised Pitt's
spikemen Saturday, handing them
their first outdoor defeat in several
years . . . and by a convincing mar-
gin . . . the strong Scarlet outfit will
offer Michigan its only home compe-
tition May 10 in a dual meet.
Sophomore hurdler Neil MacIn-
tyre, rated as one of Michigan's
most outstanding prospects last
winter, is rounding into good condi-
tion again . . . the loose-limbed
timber-topper incurred a leg injury
in the Wolverines' opening meet,
the Illinois Relays, and was forced
to forgo indoor competition.

Tragedy Of Mis-Read Sign -Or:
HowJohnny Kautz Lost Race

IF

I

Tsk, Tsk, Gentlemen

1

U

NOTRE DAME

AB
Chlebeck, cf ...... 4
Callahan, if ...... 4
Farrell, lb....... 3
Pinelli, 3b ........4
Nowicki, p ........ 5
Tallett, rf ........ 3
C. Crimmins, ss .. 4
Maguire, 2b ...... 2
Kelly, c .......... 3
Totals ...........32

R
1
1
3
1
0
0
0
0
0
6

MICHIGAN
AB R
Nelson, cf........3 1
-Holman, if .......3 0
Sofiak, ss ........ 4 0
Steppon, 2b...... 3 0
Wakefield, rf ... 3 1
Ruehle, lb .......3 0
Chamberlain, 3b .. 3 0
Harms, c.........4 0
Muir, p.......... 2 0
Pagel* ...........1 0
Westfall**........0 0
Gould, p ........ 0 0
Veigel, p .........0 0
Totals ...........29 2

O
3
4
3
0
2
1
3
4
27
O
4
0
3
4
2
9
1
4
0
0
0
0
0
27

A
0
0
0
3
1
0
3
1
1
9
A
2
0
1
4
0
1
1
2
2
0
0
1
0
14

S SPORT

OMP L"ET E
SHOP

*Batted for Gould in 7th.
**Ran for Pagel in 7th.
Notre Dame .... 102 020 100 -6
Michigan.......100 100 000 - 2
Two base hits: Chlebeck. Stolen
bases: Chlebeck, 3, Nelson, 1. Double
plays: Steppon to Ruehle, Nelson to
Steppon. Passed ball: Harms. Hits:
off Muir, 5 in 4 innings; off Gould,
3 in 3; off Veigel, 0 in 2. Bases on
balls: off Muir, 4; Gould, 1; Veigel,
3; Nowicki, 3. Hit by pitcher: by No-
wicki, 2 (Nelson, Chamberlain); by
Muir (Farrell). Struck out: by No-
wicki, 3; Muir, 2; Gould, 1; Veigel, 1.
Losing pitcher, Muir. Umpires, Lind-
say and Knode.

Twenty Fraternities
Open I-M Baseball
Yesterday was the opening day on
the Intramural baseball front as
twenty fraternity teams and two in-
dependent teams officially opened the
season.
Most of the games were marked
by few hits and frequent errors with
the number of runs often surpassing
the amount of hits. Theta Chi was
defeated in a game of this type by
Delta Kappa Epsilon. Both , teams
made only three hits, but Delta Kap-
pa Epsilon's were good for eight runs
to five for the losers. Alpha Tau
Omega lost to Delta Tau Delta, 11-4,
though both teams made only four
hits.
Chuck Solar of Phi Delta Theta
turned in the best pitching perform-
ance, holding Sigma Alpha Epsilon
to one hit as his team won, 12-1.
Slugging honors for the day went to
the Zeta Beta Tau team that garn-
ered fifteen hits to defeat Lambda
Chi Alpha, 14-7.
Results in the other games were
Sigma Nu 8, Delta Upsilon 6; Phi
Kappa Psi 16, Theta Delta Chi 6;
Triangle 6, Trigon 4; Beta Theta Pi
10, Phi Gamma Delta 6; Tau Kap-
pa Epsilon 14, Phi Sigma Kappa 5.

.1

Shawnee Golf Boils

i"

Liquid Center
Vulcanized Cover
Long True Flight

Washington at Philadelphia
Boston at New York
* * E
NATIONAL LEAGUE

New York.........
St. Louis.........
Chicago.
Brooklyn.........
Boston..
Cincinnati.........
Pittsburgh........
Philadelphia ...... .

W L
6 2
4 2
3 2
5 4
4 5
3 4
2 4
2 6

Pct.
.750
.667
.600
.556
.444
.429
.°333
.250

Tuesday's Results
Brooklyn 7, New York 4.
Philadelphia 6, Boston 4 (14 in.)
Cincinnati 1, Chicago 0.
St. Louis 9, Pittsbugh 8 (12 in.)
Wednesday's Games
Philadelphia at Brooklyn
Pittsburgh at St. Louis
Cincinnati at Chicago
New York at Boston

.-
and forget to buy your tickets NOW
for the MEN'S DORMITORIES' annual
formal DANCE, THE SPRING DORMAL.
CLARK McCLELLEN'S BAND will pro-
vide the music at the LEAGUE on MAY 3.
You can get your TICKETS at the WEST
QUAD MAIN DESK, at the STRAUSS
LIBRARY, and from the SOCIAL

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i.. ii

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Better styles, finer fits, more serv-
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