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April 22, 1941 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-04-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

L.

0I

DAILY

OFFICIAL

BULLETIN

.

r ______________________ ______________________

"1

(Continued from Page 4)

classes Wednesday morning (Mathe-
matics 48 and 128):
Speech 127: Mr. Brandt's section
will not meet today. The chapter on
"Evidence" will be discussed on
Thursday.
English 144, Beowulf, will meet in
1018 A.H. on Wednesday, April 23, and
Wednesday, April 30.
Speech 131 (first semester): Please
call at the Speech office, 3211 Angell
Hall, for your final class criticisms.
Pre-Medical Students: The Medi-
cal Aptitude Test of the Association
of American Medical Colleges will be
given at the University of Michigan
on Thursday, May 1. Since the test
is a normal requirement for admis-
sion to practically all medical schools,
all students who are planning to en-
ter a medical school in the fall of
1942 should take the test. The
Medical School of the University of
Michigan especially urges all students
planning to apply for admission in
1942 to write the examination. Due
to change in policy of the Associa-
tion, the examination will be taken
earlierin the student's pre-medical
preparation. It is not necessary that
all premedical requirements be com-
pleted at the time of the test if the
requirements. will be completed in
time for entrance in the fall of 1942.
Information may be obtained in
Room 4 University Hall from April
22 through April 29. A fee is charged
each students which must be paid
immediately at the Cashier's Office.
Concerts
Guest Organ Recital: Paul Calla-
way, Organist-Director of the Nation-
al Catheral in Washington, D.C.,
will appear as a guest artist on the
Organ Recital Series at 4:15 p.m.
Wednesday, April 23, in Hill Auditori-
um. Prior to taking his present posi-
tion in Washington, Mr. Callaway
was the assistant organist at St.

Thomas Church in New York for four
years, and spent three years at St.
Marks Church in Grand Rapids,
Michigan. The recital will be com-
plimentary to the general public.
Carillon Recital: Percival Price,
University Carillonneur, will present
the second in the Spring Series of
carillon recitals from 7:15 to 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, April 24, in the Burton
Memorial Tower. The program will
include Dutch folk songs and selec-
tions by J. S. Bach, Schumann, and
Beethoven. Professor Price will give
regular bi-weekly performances at the
same hour on every Sunday and
Thursday through June 19.
Exhibitions
Exhibition: John James Clarkson-
Oils, Water Colors and Drawings. Ex-
hibition Galleries of the Rackham
School, March 28-April 26. Daily (ex-j
cept Sundays) including evenings.
Auspices: Ann Arbor Art Association
and Institute of Fine Arts, University
of Michigan.
Lectures
University Lectures:, Dr. Harold S.
Booth, Professor of Chemistry, West-
ern Reserve University, will lecture
today, under the auspices of the Uni-
versity of Michigan Section of the
American Chemical Society, as fol-
lows.
At 4:15 p.m. in 303 Chemistry
Building on the subject: "Chemistry
of the Non-Metallic Fluorides."
At 8:00 p.m. in the Rackham Am-
phitheater on the subject: "Chemistry
Through the Microscope" (illustrated
with colored slides).
University Lecture: Professor Lang-
don Warner of Fogg Museum, Hiar-
vaid University, will lecture on the
subject, "Masterpieces of Folk Art in
Japan." illustrated) 'at 7:30 p.M.
on Wednesday, April 23, in Room D,
Alumni Memorial Hall. The public
is cordially invited.
University Lecture: Professor Ralph

E. Cleland, Chairman of the Depart-
ment of Botany, Indiana University,
will lecture on the subject, "Chromo-
some Behavior in Relation to the
Origin of Species' (illustrated) under
the auspices of the Department of
Botany at 4:15 p.m. on Thursday,
May 8, in the Natural Science Audi-
torium. The public is cordially in-
vited.,
Julien Bryan lecture: The Oratori-
cal Association will present the il-
lustrated lecture, "Chile and Peru,"
in Hill Auditorium tonight at 8:15.
Season ticket coupons originally is-
sued for the William Beebe lecture
will be honored. The box office will
open at 6:00 p.m. Wednesday night
Mr. Bryan will give his illustrated lec-
ture on "Turkey," and Thursday night
he will present the pictures showing
"The Siege of Warsaw." The William
Beebe lecture coupons will admit to
all of these lectures.
The Annual Dr. William J. Mayo
Lectureship in Surgery will be given
Friday, April 25, at 1:30 p.m., in the
second floor amphitheater of the
University Hospital. The speaker will
be - Dr. James Taggert Priestley,
Assistant Professor of Surgery at
the Mayo Clinic.
A SUMMER SCHOOL
,FOR ENGINEERS
To Make Up Courses
To Attain Advanced Standing
To Train For National Defense
The Colorado
School of Mines
Summer Session
offers complete, thorough courses
including field and laboratory
courses throughout the summer.
In America's Vacation Land
Recreational Opportunities make
Summer Study Enjoyable
For Details Write
Director Summer Session
Colorado School of Mines
Golden, Colorado

Members of the Junior and Senior
classes will be excused in order to
attend this lecture.
French Lecture: Professor M. S.
Pargment will give the last lecture
on the Cercle Francais program:
"L'oeuvre de Charlie Chaplin d'apres
la critique cinegraphique francaise."
Wednesday, April 23, at 4:15, room
103, Romance Language Building.
Events Today
Junior Mathematical Society will
meet tonight at 8:00 in 3201 A.H. Mr.
Jack Mann will speak on "How an
Angle Can Be Trisected."
Sigma Rho Tau will meet tonight
at 7:30 in the Union. Speech activi-
ties will be resumed, preparations be-
ing made for the coming contests.
All members are requested to be
present.
American Institute of Electrical
6 J

Engineers will meet tonight at the
Michigan Union at 8:00 p.m. Prof.
Duffendack of the Physics Dept. will
speak on "The Electron Microscope."
Refreshments.
The Spring Parley Continuations
Committee will meet today at 3:00
p.m. at the Union; the room will be
posted on the bulletin board. Final
plans for the Parley will be discussed.

Imperative that all committeeI
bers be present.

mem-i

Seminar: Mr. Leonard S. Gregory
will conclude the Seminar on Relig-
ious Music with a lecture on "The Re-
ligious Music of the 19th Century,"'
Lane Hall today at 4:15 p.m.
Graduate Students, and other stu-
dents interested, are invited to listen

r

to a program of recorded music in
the Men's lounge of the Rackhaxm
Building tonight at 8:00. Program:
Tschaikovsky-Piano Concerto No. 1,
Moussorgsky, Pictures at an Exhibi-
tion, and Prokofieff, Classical Sym-
phony.
Senior Ball Committee. will meet
tonight at 8:45 in the Union.
(Continued on Page 8)

1.

NOTICE
Seniors and graduate
students
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