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April 01, 1941 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T.E_ APRIL i1941

Engineering
Scholarships
Will Be Given
Five Students Will Receive
Awards; Applications
Must Be In By Saturday
400 Grants Offered
Engineers desiring to apply for the
five scholarships which are being of-
fered by the College of Engineering
must do so before noon Saturday
in the offices of Assistant Dean Al-
fred H.,Lovell in the West Engineer-
ing Building.
Among the scholarships which will
be offered are the Simon Mandel-
awarded in amounts of approximately
baum grants, three of which will be,
$400 each. Students applying for
these awards must have completed
45 hours of work, must be an Amer-
ican citizen, must have a general av-
erage of at least 2.5 and must be
either entirely or partially self-sup-
porting.
Several Cornelius Donovan schol-
arships will be given to seniors in
amounts of $200 each. The require-
ments are the same as those for the
Mandelbaum prizes.
Harriet Eveleen Hunt scholarships
which will be awarded similarly to
theDonovan prizes, have the same
requirements as the Mandelbaum
awards except that only 15 hours of
school work is required.
In amounts of approximately $100
each, several Robert Campbell Gem-
mel Memorial scholarships are re-
ceived by certain freshmen and soph-
omores in the College who have a
3.0 average and the other require-I
ments mentioned above.
No requirements other than cer-
tain junior and senior engineers have
shown themselves to be loyal Ameri-
cans and partially or .wholly self-
supporting are necessary for the Jo-
seph Boyer Fund scholarships.
The scholarships will probably be
awarded sometime in May upon the
recommendation of the engineers'I
Committee on 'Scholarships.
Speech Finals
Entries Named
Six To Compete In Contest
Tomorrow Afternoon
In the elimination contest held
yesterday, six students in Speech 31
classes were selected to take part in
the final contest to be held tomorrow
in the Natural Science Auditorium.
Finalists and their topics are: Mil-
ton Fishman, '42, "Living Today";
Robert L. Lam, '42, "Young China";
J. Lewin Epstein, '43, "His Majesty's
Government"; Robert C. Mitchell,
'43, "Relief from War Worries"; Neal
Sperhake, '42, "A Need for a New
Change in Our Attitude Toward Con-
servation"; and John F. Sullivan, '43,
"The Relation of Evolution to Mind."
Prof. Henry M. Mosher was chair-
man and the judges, all teaching
fellows in speech, were Richard H.
Hadley, Arthur Klein and Hugh Nor-
ton.
These contests are held twice a se-
mester and are open to all students
taking Speech 31. Finalists are se-
lected from a group composed of a
member'chosen from each section.
Symphony To Play
Prof. Thor Johnson of the1 School

of Music will conduct the University
Symphony Orchestra in two concerts
at 3 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. today in
Central High School in Flint.
COLLEGE WOMEN
COLLECE: women, with good
educational backgrounds plus
professional secretarial and
business training, are in de-
mand for important positions.
Investigate now The Career
that lead to interesting busi-
ness and professional careers.
REGISTRATION DATES
SUMMER QUARTER . . ..JUNE 30
FALL QUARTER . . . . . SEPT. 29
7N~r Write for Free Booklet
"'Careers"
INSTITUTE
720 N. Michigan Ave., Dept. S9, Chicago

University School Of Nursing
Celebrates 50th Anniversary

_-

Scout Training
Plan Proposed

Three Students Disrupt Detroit;
Cop Pays Of f To Get Rid Of 'Em

Editor's Note : The University of
Michigan School of Nursingicelebrates
its 50th anniversary this year. Since
the nurses, because of the hard and
segregated work they do, are unknown
to a great part of the campus, and be-
cause of their importance in the na-
tional defense program, we feel that
a series of articles on them and their
activities would he appropriate at this
time.
By GLORIA NISHON
The University Hospital Training
School for Nurses, one of the earliest
training schools to come into exist-
ence in this state, was established
under the Medical Faculty in the,
winter of 1891 in an effort to pro-
vide care for the patients of the hos-

nurse's help in social reform and
philanthropy, and in scientific andf
preventive work. With this in mind,
in about 1925 the five-year combined
curriculum was introduced, a planI
whereby a young woman might take
three years of work in the literary
school and continue with. concen-
trated nursing for two years. This is
now called the nursing a'nd letters
course and can be distinguished from'
the "diploma" course of three years'
duration.
IHousing Facilities Needed
By 1922 the need for adequate
housing facilities for the large num-
ber of nurses had become crucial.

Extension Service Offers By BILL BAKER
Teaching Facilities (Special to The Daily)
DETROIT, Mar. 30-This normally
peaceful city today received its first
Boy Scout training programs, deal- taste of the vagaries of college life,
ing chiefly with the, education of and found its normal routine tem-
scout masters, conducted through the porarily disrupted by the antics of
facilities of the University Extension three University of Michigan stu-
Service in cooperation with scout dents who hit town this morning in
boards are being planned here, Uni- an open model-T.
versity and scout officials announced Two policemen, three taxi drivers
recently. and several shop employes took part
According to Dr. Charles A. Fisher, in the affair, which started when the
director of the Extension Service, the three students decided it would be
program was originally proposed byIfun to throw peanut shells into the
Mr. O. H. Benson, who was national open loudspeaker of a pawnshop
director of rural scouting, and will radio.
be the first undertaking of its kind Sound Irks Pawnbroker
adopted by a state university. It was fun, too, or so they .said,
Temporary plans include short but the gurgling sound resulting was
courses to be conducted by the Uni- unpleasant to the ears of the pawn-
versity for scoutmasters, and pos- broker, who summoned the police-
sibly correspondence courses for man on the corner.C
prospective scout leaders. Escaping by means of an alley,
(the students found themselves on
another block, imediately commenced
tie or sO fcwriting "U. of M." In chalk on all the
squares in the sidewalk. Another po-
ItC''e T I terie liceman, who later professed to ┬░be a
/ State man, stopped this undertaking,
Fl yigAppli+cants so the three Ann Arbor fugitives again
Fly-ing L pp-~a-

took up the chase, again succeeded in
outdodging the arm of the law.
They next entered a small rest-
aurant, where they sat down at the
counter, and proceeded to unwrap
their newspaper-wrapped lunches.
Requesting a glass of water, they be-
gan eating to the mute astonish-
ment of the proprietor, who finally
expelled 'them from the establish-
ment.
Students Set Out
Boarding the model-T once more,
they rattled off in the direction of
downtown, but found themselves
stalled dead in the middle of an inter-
section, to the angry protestations
of three taxi drivers, whose cabs were
blocked on the narrow street.
The students refused to let the car
be pushed, got out, opened the "hood,
and tinkered with the machinery in-
side, until another policeman---the
one involved in the first chase-ap-
peared on the scene. He ordered them
to push the car to one side, allow-
ing the big-city traffic to go its way
after a ten minute delay.
But the policeman had a heart, had
once been a college. man, himself.
With a friendly warning to stick
to Ann Arbor for their antics, a loan
of fifty cents to buy gas, and a sigh
of relief, he sent the wandering stu-
dents homeward to Ann Arbor.
L1

pital. The school was limited to eight James B. Couzens, through a gener-
students under the direction of Mrs. ous endowment to the school. made
Jane Pettigrew, a trained nurse pur- possible the construction of Couzens
suing medical studies in the Univer- Hall, which has since been used as a
sity. I home for all the nurses.
Strong Character Demanded In the 50 years of the school's
The directors of the school sought existence over 1600 young women
to heiersofhyo omenuh have completed the nursing course
not only "naturally and education- and have helped care for the sick,
!- al aapte tothework" bt as pread the gospel of positive health,
osadapted to tewong rch bate alsand educate nurses in every state of
high ideals of womanhood and im- the union and in many foreign lands.
bued with the importance and seri-
ousness of their undertaking." Prof. tti-n"Ia usen
From time to time, as the exigen-- r
cies of the hospital demanded, the Wil[c ure oday
nursing force was increased until in I_ -
1898 the school boasted sixteen stu-
dents. Those pioneers performed Prof. Richard Ettinghausen o~ the
their duties under grate difficulties, Islamic arts department will speak
owing to inadequate equipment and at 7:30 p.m. today at Lan'e Hall on
unsuitable surroundings--the nurses "Moslem Art."
being housed in the basement of the Under the auspices of the sent--
hospital and in outside homes. The nar in religiousarts of the Student
hospital at that time, of course, was
the old South Hospital which now Religios Association, ProeSSOr t-
houses the local Naval ROTC unit. inghausen will describe the forms
In the autumn of 1899 Miss Grace and symbolic meanings of art
Ellsworth, class of 1898, became Sup- through Mohammedan countries. le
erintendent of Nurses and for the will also trace the historical develop-
first time graduates were perma- ment of Persian art.
nently employed, a head clinic nurse fessor ttnghusen, a graduate
and two head nurses.
Demand ForNurses Grows of the University of Frankfurt and
By the beginning of the twentieth Cambridge, was an associate profes-
century a nurse's education had come sor at Frankfort-am-Main in Ger-
to mean more than the preparation many. For three years he held the
of herself to be an assistant to thepotfreach soite tte
physician in the care of patients in post of research associate at the
the hospital and in homes. There American Institute for Iranian Art
was a growing demand for the and Archeology.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Band's Spring Concert
To Be Presented April 9
Preparations for the University
Concert Band's 26th annual spring
concert Wednesday, April 9, in Hill
Auditorium, ire in full swing.
The Band, under the direction of
Prof. William D. Revelli, has ar-
ranged a program of half Wagner
and half contemporary music, in-
cluding "Wotan's Farewell and the
Magic Firemusic."
Miss Lucille 'Bennett, violinist, will
appear as soloist. Miss Bennett will
play an unusual composition by her
father, a concerto for violin with
band accompaniment,
WHAT GIFFS?
THE
3 SURAY
SATURDAY
7/et , Utin

Captain Ward M. Estes of the
U. S. Army Air Corps will be at ROTC!
Headquarters today, tomorrow and
Thursday for the purpose of inter-
viewing men who wish to become
Flying Cadets.
Men who are appointed Flying Ca-
dets mst be over 20 and under 27
years of age, have two years of college
or the ability to pass the educational
examination, unmarried, citizen: and
physically normal.
Applications are also being taken
for non-flying cadet training. Capt
Estes wishes to interview men who
are interested in this training.

Recital To Be Given
By Prof. Christian
Prof. Palmer Christian of the
School of Music will play a collec-
tion of ten noted compositions by
Bach, Franck and Delamarter in an
organ recital at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow
in Hill Auditorium.
His program will open with five se-
lections by Bach, "Allegro" (Concerto
in G), "Siciliano" (Sonata for Fluet
and Piano), "March" ("Dramma per
Musica"), "Sonatina" (Cantata:
"Gods Times is Best") and "Passaca-
glia and Fugue ii C minor.

Dancing
anid

Co

I

legiate

(see Thursday's Daily)

Informal

$1.00

i

Dental School Students Attend
Annual Kellogg Field Program,

II

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---. .

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MOM

TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING to Texas Spring vacation.
Passengers Needed - girls prefer-
ably. Not driving back. Call 4121
ext. 2145. 324
H. B. GODFREY
MOVING - STORAGE- PACKING
Local and Long Distance Moving.
410 N. Fourth Ave. Phone 6297
29c
FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Suite with private bath
and shower. Also nicely furnished
double room with adjoining lava--I
tory-422 E. Washington. 3221
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY-2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c

HEATING and PLUMBING
PLUMBING & HEATING-Let Sam
C. Andres, make your needed re-
pairs over the holidays. Phone
7102. 30c
FOR SALE
FACULTY-Have your Academic
Costume repaired or replaced by
ARTCRAFT of GRAND RAPIDS.
Call 3293. Mr. E. Willard King. 323
TYPING
TYPING--Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
j 2-141 14c
TYPIST. Experienced. L. M. Hey-
wood, 414 Maynard St. Phone 5689.
27c

By EUGENE MANDEBERG
Thirty-one Dental School seniors
left Ann Arbor Sunday, March 30, fo'r
the second annual field program in
the W. K. Kellogg Fundation's Mich-
igan Community Health Project.
The two weeks trip will give the
students an opportunity to observe the
various activities and programs, both
official and unofficial, of County
Health Departments and to familiar-
ize themselves with actual private
dental practice in relation to a rural
community health program.
A chartered bus took the .students
to Hillsdale, Calhoun, Allegan, Bar-
ry, Eaton, and Van Buren Counties,
where small groups of the 31 seniors
will be shown the resources of com-
munity health departments and their
utilization in developing better stand-
ards of health for the population.
Students To Study Work
This observation will comprise the
first week's activities. During the
second week, the students will follow
the private practioner's work and re-
sponsibilities in a community health
program
The program of the first week will
include a family health counselor's
conference, and family and school
visits with the counsellors; a sani-
tation inspection of restaurants,
water supplies, dairies, and other,
plants; a dental program confer-
ence; and a camp program at the
three W. K. Kellogg Foundation
camps.
The dental practice program of

the second week will take the stu- I
dents into various dentists' offices
of the area where they will observe
patient-dentist . relationships, prac-
tice management, and actual oper-j
ative procedures where possible.
Will Meet Health Officers
During the entire period the stu-
dents will meet health officers and
dentists for discussions of home vis-j
its, problems of approach, and case#
tudies.
Each student is reimbursted by the
W. K. Kellogg Foundation to cover
expenses of transportation, room and
board, and incidentals during the
field trip.
The seniors will keep running ar-
ratives of their impressions, reactions
and criticisms of their experience ,
which will be used to improve future
field orograms.
Presbyterian Organist
Will.Give Recital Today
William N. Barnard, organist of the
First Presbyterian Church, will give
another of his regular weekly organ
vesper programs at 4:15 p.m. today
at the church.
Two numbers by Bach, "In Dulci
Jubilo" and "Das alte Jahr vergang-
en ist," will open the service, followed
by "Rejoice, ye pure in heart," by
Sowerby.

The DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH presents
PLAY PRODUCTION
"REMEMBER
THE DAY"
by PHILO HIGLEY and PHILI> DUNNING
A nostalgic comedy of adolescence
OPENING TOMORROW
WEDNESDAY through Saturday Nights
April 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 8:30 P.M.... 75c, 50c, 35c .. . Phone 6300
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

I

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i

-

DOBBS

VIOLA
typist,
public.

STEIN-Experienced legal
also mimeographing. Notary
Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.

J / 2'l/G Lt l/Gf elQ' L
(%

STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special
dent rates. Moe Laundry,
South First St. Phone 3916.

stu-
226
loc

STUDENT BUNDLES-3 shirts, 3
pairs of sox, 6 handkerchiefs fin-
ished, 2 suits underwear, 2 bath
towels, 1 pajama suit fluffed-99c.
Ace Hand Laundry, 1114 S. Uni-
versity. J1'
MISCELLANEOUS
BEN THE TAILOR-Get my price
for your used clothes. Call 5387
after 6 p.m. is
rHESIS BINDING-Mimeographing.
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. 19c
EXPERT HOSIERY and garment re-
pair. Reasonable rates. Weave-Bac
Shop-Upstairs in Nickels Arcade.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL--
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. phone
7112. 5c

TAILORING & ,PRESSING-12
STOCKWELL residents - Skilled al-
terations promptly done. Just
across the street. Phone 2-2678.
A. Graves. 28c
WANTED TO BUY.-4
a

i

WANTED--Any new or old clothing.
Pay from $5.00 to $500.00 for suits,
overcoats, typewriters, furs-Per-
sians, minks. Phone Ann Arbor
6304 for appointments. Sam.
ig
MICHIGAN
GRANDEST CAST!
The first young lady of the screen
.with the screen's
** top talenti

B At F ' 4I A IS
v. IN
Y TODAY NOON
MEAT LOAF SANDWICH Soup
Choice of a Salad or Dessert Beverage L ,,

s

.. _ -

AOC

\ Y ;l
\"
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lei ,'.1 \.
1.. "
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::tip

CHOP SUEY & RICE

Assorted Rolls or Bread

WEEK DAYS at 2-4-7-9 P.M.
Matinees
25c inc. tax
CELLO
~ ABS~f COST
L,.nOWMAAIoCU
vw Nt P ETOH
IDREWS STERS y
/ and Ca jumPR 1 1v'gfl o

Baked Beans
Mashed Potato
Wax Beans
Choice of a Salad o

(Choice of One)
Fresh Harvard Beets .S
es Buttered Noodles
Early June Peas
r Dessert Beverage

OUp

THIS EVENING

%eww4a
RYIN e
~x1n ?

COUNTRY SAUSAGE & SPICED APPLE Assorted Rolls or Bread
(Choice of ONE)
Panfried Potatoes Baked Beans Soup

Mashed Potatoes Wa
Fresh Harvard Beets

x Bean

s Early June Peas
Buttered Noodles

A STVART NEW COLOR
FOR GE NERlA L W E AI R
The style-setting centers of Princeton
and-New 1llaven gv e you this shade of tan.
A smart for town as for campus!

39c

Choice of a Salad or Dessert

Beverage

SUPER CURED STEAK

Assored Roor Brea

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.7..1_L fL.UJ>J,.' J 1. L1. Ts, 2k.I.l.CCUJV11 ". UL'-.'-.Las

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