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March 23, 1941 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-03-23

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bNDYMaRCI W 1941 THE MICHIGAN D A ILY

Junior Play's Short CoatsFor Campus Newman Club Miltary Ball To
Patron . Li t S$prIng Dance Arid Prp
Is Announced I o Be April 25 sByodEAier..
There's something about a soldier,
President And Mrs. Ruthven Bill Sawyer's Band Will Plo" and there's something about a mili-
To Head Those invited To See For Annual Ball; Ticket Sale tary ball too. It's that something
that puts the glow of tradition aboutj
Opening Of 'Jumping Jupiter To Be Open To General Public :he Ball given each year by the mem-
bers of the Reserve Officers Train-
Heading the list of patrons and pa- The annual Newman Club spring ing Corps.
tronesses for the Junior Girls' pre- formal will be held from 10 p.m. to Twenty-three years ago the militar-
sentation of "Jumping Jupiter" open- 1 a.m. Friday, April 25, in the Union ists first stepped out with their social
ing Wednesday, March 26 at theevnthtscley seibste
Ballroom. Bill Sawyer and his orches- event that so closely resembles the
League will be President and Mrs. pomp and dignity of dances in the
Ruthven, tra will furnish the music. The gen- regular army. With patriotism of
Also invited to attend the perform- ral public is invited to attend. the present day being what it is, this
ances are Vice-President and Mrs. S. Tickets for the dance will be one year's Ball, to be held May 9, should
W. Smith, Vice-President artd Mrs. d seilywl nrtiigad
Crec Yakm Rgn EshrDollar and seventy five cents a couple, doepcal eli eann n
Clarence Yoakum, Regent Esther 'r further creating the customs of past
Cram and Mr. L. V. Cram, Dean Alice and will be on sale at the Union, the
Lloyd, Prof. and Mrs. Lewis Gram, ILeague,Ulrich's book store, Wahr's, yea Drill Team To Perform
Prof. Carl G. Brandt, Dean and Mrs. St. Mary's Chapel, or from members
Wells I. Bennett, Dr. and Mrs. Wil- Always a part of the affair is the
liam W. Bishop, Dean and Mrs. Rus- of the central committee. drill team which performs on the
sell W. Bunting, Dean and Mrs. James Albin Schinderle, '41, is general ballroom floor for the guests. New
B. Edmonson and Dean and Mrs. E. + hairrman of the dance. Working with this year will be the presentation
H. Kraus. xt f i of the drum and bugle corps. Another
rsBy ahMi enethim will be Geraldine G anfield, '42. time-honored tradition is the grand
Mrs. Byr Bacher, Miss Jeannette _:nusic chairman; James Landers, '43, march and saber arch formed by the
Perry, Dean 'and Mrs. Walter Rea,neiitasofSbaradBle
Dean and Mrs. Erich Walter, Regis- (Editor's Note: This week's column is nublicity chairman; Catherine Nor- new initiates of Scabbard and Blade
trar and Mrs. Ira Smith, Prof. and ' illen by Grace Miller. and not the ton, '42, patrons chairman. Others for all the guests to walk through.
Mite herself.) y Besides a distinguished group of
Mrs. Edward Adams, Prof. and Mrs. rsn the committee are Sally Walsh, patrons, all the officers of the teach-
Henry Adams, Prof. and Mrs. Robert Just mention "Fantasia" and you'll n charge of decorations, Dorothy ing staff will be present and in uni-
C. Angell, Dr. Margaret Bell and get reactions, that guaranteed. You'll Dzuroux, Grad., program chairman, forms. Most of the members of the
- get a disgusted rush of criticism from ROTC will be in uniform too
The List Continues i some, and a "My dear, it was just Jorge Carulla, 41E, entertainment ROT will be i or too.
' chirmn; nd ohnMc~ughon, Just after the first World War, irt
Prof. and Mrs. Orland Boston, Prof. too clever," from others who probably chairman; and John McNaughton, 1922, when many officers from other
and Mrs. John Bradshaw, Prof. and are mimicking their favorite amateur Grad., financial chairman. countries were studying here at the
lrs. Edward Bragg, Prof. and Mrs. musical enthusiast. Any member of the club wishing University, the pageantry of uni-
Palmer Christian, Dr. and Mrs. Ver- Obviously the only way to ap- to work on the dance may do so by forms was especially brilliant, for
ner Crane and Prof. and Mrs. Joseph proach a new quantity like this at- contacting Schinderle or the head there were representatives from Ser-
Hayden, Prof. and Mrs. Louis C. Kar- tempt of Disney's to set cartoons to of the committee on which he would bia, France, Roumania, Canada and
pinski, Prof. and Mrs. David Mattern, great music, is from a personal angle, like to serve. England who came in official dress.
Prof. and Mrs. Kenneth McMurry, even if it has to be somewhat bellig- Decorations for the dance will have and flags from these countries lined
Prof. and Mrs. George R. Moore and erent to hold its own. Treat the a spring theme and will be definitely the wall.
Prof. Howard M. Ehrmann. production as a whim of Disney's, announced at a later date. It was at this year's ball that music
Prof. and M rs. W alter B. Pills- and you'll take it in the spirit offered. '-Da d s-----L--------c
bury, Dr. and Mrs. T. Luther Purdom, Let it influence your entire concept
Prof. and Mrs. A. Franklin Sholll<of the music, and you're sunk.jSym phoniC M usic Sale
Prof. and Mrs. E. Blythe Stason, Prof.
and Mrs. Harlow O. Whittemore, "Fantasia" opened with shots of
Prof. and Mrs. Cecil C. Craig, Prof. the orchestra tuning up, in strikingA I i-+., u 1-krn T-L C I
and Mrs. Arthur L. Dunham, Prof. silhouettes against vivid colora r rAs J t ter baugs T unrn T Che eassio5cs
and Mrs. Avard Fairbanks. Prof. and backgrounds. There are about 54 ~

isplay Dignity
f rm I a

tYL

l Ibrii fYadn
any college dance of any university.
At one time, Military Ball was held in
Barbour and Waterman gymnasiums,
and the walls were lined with booths
run by the various fraternities. There
was always some surprise enter-
tainment.
Mock Air Raid Held
One of these entertainments Was,
a mock air raid held at midnight,
with a dirigible crossing the darkened
ballroom followed by squadrons of.
planes and illuminated by search-
lights. The dirigible was arranged to
explode just before reaching the
opposite side. Another year a war
scene was lighted up above the or-
chestra-soldiers were shooting and
climbing barbed wire fences. When
the lights on the mural went out.
however, the scene turned into a tall
figure of the Goddess of Peace, seen
in luminous paint.
Another custom that marks this
military social event is the Scabbard
and Blade dinner always given pre-
iious to the dance. It is attended by
the teaching staff and student mem-
bers of the honor society and their
guests.

Senior Robes
To Go On Sale
Tomorrow
Senior women are urged to pur-
chase caps and gowns from 1 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m. tomorrow in the League
Ballroom as the sale will last only
one day, and no one will be admitted
to the Senior Supper unless clad in
the graduating costume.
White collars to be worn with caps
and gowns, and tickets to the dinner
and the opening night of "Jumping
Jupiter" will be on sale at the same
time. Tickets are priced at 75 cents
and include admission to both the
dinner and the J.G.P. performance.
Caps and gowns will cost, $4.50
when purchased together, with a
$3.00 refund on the garments. Gowns
alone will cost $3.00 with a $2.00 re-
fund, while caps and tassels alone
will cost $1.75 with a 75 cent re-
fund.
Senior Society is sponsoring the
sale of the white collars which will
cost 25 cents each and may be ob-
tained at the same time as the caps
and gowns.

Thre e for the Campus

SS.

Mrs. Herbert A. Kenyon and Prof.
and Mrs. Earl C. O'Roke.
Prof. and Mrs. Walter C. Sadler,
Prof. and Mrs. Bennett Weaver, Prof.
and Mrs. Jose M. Albaladejo, Prof.!
and Mrs. Frederic H. Aldrich, Prof.
and Mrs. Charles M. Davis, Prof.
and Mrs. Julio del Toro, Prof. and.
Mrs Nelson W. Eddy, Prof. and Mrs.
Edward S. Everett, Prof. and Mrs.
Richard C. Fuller, Prof. Thelma B.
Lewis, and Prov. Morley Scott.
Others To Attend
Prof. and Mrs. Dwight C. Long,
Prof. and Mrs. Frederick K. Sparrow,
Jr., Prof. and Mrs. Mischa Titiev,
Prof. and Mrs. Mentor L. Williams,
Prof. Valentine B. Windt, Miss Ethel
A. McCormick, Miss Adelaide Adams,
Dr. and Mrs. Edward Blakeman, Dr.
and Mrs. Claude Eggertsen, Dr. Mel-
don Everett and Miss Marie Hartwig.
Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Gooch, Mr.
Karl H. Reichenbach, Miss Louise
Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew S.
Baker, Mrs. Beach Conger, Mrs. Holly
Dobbins, Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Drury,
Miss Ruth Goolander, Miss Hope,
Hartwig, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick
Jordan, Miss Barbara McIntyre, Mrs.
Martha Ray, Miss Rhoda Reddig and
Mrs. Philip Wygant.
Open Houses Today
Alpha Delta Pi will hold an Open
House from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. today, in
honor of their new initiates. Alpha.
Epsilon Pi will also hold an Open
House, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. today.
NOTICE
Bowling and Basketball sched-
ules will appear in Tuesday's Daily.

speakers placed on all sides of the!
theatre, giving a three-dimensional
effect. Disney's impression of
Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D
Minor was purely abstract, being
expressed in motion and color. The
treatment keeps the listener's mind
almost entirely on the music itself.
The "Chinese Dance" from Tschai-
kowsky's "Nutcracker Suite" became
a group of very intent little mush-
tooms with large orange oriental hats
doing a serious ridiculous dance.
The "Sorcer's Apprentice" takes
the lovable Mickey Mouse into his
most colorful role, as the capricious!
apprentice, who let his master's magic
get a little beyond his control.
Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring" isG
a tremendous achievement in
bringing back to life the history of
the earth as man never knew it.
Putting a peaceful, if somewhat
anticlimactic, ending to his master-
piece, Disney found Gothic majesty
in the interlacing branches of a
forest in contrast to the horror of
"Bald Mountain." This selection
was the only one given vocal treat-
ment, and it was in this one that
the new handling of the music was
especially impressive.
As an example of what man's imag-
ination can find in more or less ab-
stract music, "Fantasia" is a superb
rroduction, and a new slant on music
that I don't think will be abandoned.
Part of the criticism really is the+
fault of the listener, for he must
learn to balance his senses of soundc
and sight so that one doesn't domin-I
ate the other.
Faculty Group To Meet1
Members of the evening drama sec-

By RHODA LESHINE
Pointing out the reputation of Ann
Arbor as a growing musical center,
Michigan is rated as the third highest
among all college campuses in the
country in classical music apprecia-
tion, according to statistics of one of
the largest national record companies.
Seven out of ten students still select
swing as their choice in records, but a
local campus record shop reports that
there is a definite trend taking the
jitterbug into the field of the classics.
The three most popular composers,
as shown by record sales, are Tchaik-
owsky, Beethoven and Brahms. Tchai-
kowsky's "First Piano Concerto, Num-
ber 1," is the most popular classical
album students purchase and his
"Romeo and Juliet Overture" leads in
second choice.
Shaw's 'Concerto' Is Popular
Artie Shaw's "Concerto For A Clar-
inet" has been given much credit in
breaking down the awe often held by
students toward concertos, a campus
survey shows.
Michigan students have been found
to be 50 per cent exclusively swing
fans, 30 per cent favor only the class-
ics and 20 per cent prove their versa-
tility by wanting a little of each-in
any form, it's music they desire whe-
ther their interest be in boogey-woog-
ey or symphony.
Glenn Miller plays a heavy favorite
in keeping his top position in a poll
of popular bands. Tommy Dorsey,
Artie Shaw and Benny Goodman are
runners-up although Shaw becomes
the cream of the bottle when he puts
out an individual hit as "Frenesi."
The Michigan man is not senti-
mental-in his choice of music. He
has more of a sense of rhythm and
generally prefers swing music in-

on the Michigan coed. She chooses
her music in a slower rhythm with
a sentimental beat.
Men base their decision in the
choice of a record on the repercus-
sion of the rhythm while the women
are more likely to concentrate on
the quality of the voice of the soloist.
Students spend twice as much from
the first to the fifth of the month
than they do a few weeks later when
the allowance has dwindled. And
winter shows better record sales than
does summer.
Michigan has reflected the de-
crease in price in classical records
with a startling greater demand for
the older works. That the Michigan
student has a sincere appreciation
of classical music, is brought out by
the fact that much of his record
library is being confined o works ofl
the composers while his swing shelf
is rapidly disappearing.
19 Men Initiated
By Zeta Beta Thu

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Zeta Beta Tau announces the
initiation of Henry W. Bloch, '43,
Warner Hineman, '43, Daniel L.
Seiden, '43, Julius F. Solomon, Jr.,
'43, Marvin Borman, '44, Bernard
M. Brown, '44, Richard L. Cole, '44,
J. Richard Cooper, '44, William
M. Davidson, '44, Martin E. Fef-
erman, '44, Cornell Janeway, '44,
Richard L. Kahn, '44, Kenneth L.
Kardon, '44, Haskell J. Kellner, '44,
Warren R. Laufe, '44, Norman D.
Schwartz, '44, Ora E. Sievers, '44,
Joseph H. Silversmith, Jr., '44,
and Edwin H. Weil, Jr., '44. James
Helzburg, '44, and Herbert Heaven-
rich, '44, were recently pledged by
Zeta Beta Tau.

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Have you heard of EMBLE
ANIA? It is the keynote of t
DILLON SHOP these days. Ve
patriotic-on formals, dress
suits, and coats. You will tc
as pert as a little girl in a na
coat with emblems on yC
sleeve and buttons. If you wo
rather have a plain coat
suit, you can buy clever cli
and lapel pins to wear on sp
ial occasions.
Bare MIDRIFFS are no long
confined solely to bathing st
and formals. JACOBSON
have something new in th
midriff pajamas and gow
Striking South American prix
in red, yellow, or blue. I
warm spring nights these v
be cool and comfortable-$l.

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LOOKIG

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GLflSS

"In spite of hats, suits, mal
up, and pearls, you just can't
glamorous unless you've
curls."
and in Ann Arbor weatl
you can't keep curls without
permanent. At the VOG
BEAUTY SHOP you can he
a permanent which will ma
your hair look naturally cu
in the rainiest of weather.
1-
WEEKEND SU+ITS are sor
thing new at the CAMP
SHOP - three pieces wx
jacket, skirt, and slacks.
course, there are many, me
others, too. Lots of stunn
Glen plaids and smooth twee
All in beautiful pastels a
navy.
"YU"-sophisticated enough
please your smoothest date
dainty enough to please y
grandmother. This is Hari
Hubbard Ayer's newest p
fume. CALKINS - FLETCH
is featuring this along w
Dunhill's WHITE HYACIN
a scent that smells like spri
>4
Looking GLAMOROUS a
feeling GLORIOUS, you
impress your family when
step off the train this vacat
in a new hat. The pre-Ea
special at the POLHEMUS H
SHOP offers loads of hats t
will make you a new wom
inside and out-$4.95 and $5

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vith j
TH
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you
Lion%
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ian,
.95.j
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A two-p
shepard
black.
middy i
shining
new pl
changea
on-the-c

GOWNS that look like for-
mals, lovely and flattering.
They come in Bemberg Sheer
in lovely floral print with
blue, peach and white back-
grounds. You'll love their
full skirts and trim waists.
Sizes 34 and 36. Others 32
to 40.

tion of the faculty women's club will cluding jump'n'jives, riff tunes, and
meet at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at the plain hot stuff.
Michigan Union. Number of meeting Coed Likes Slower Rhythm
room will be posted on the bulletin The pendulum swings the other
board. way, however, when it concentrates

piece middy blouse dress
-checked wool . . . navy
A separate long-stemm
n navy or black jersey.
sharkskin blouse with
unging neckline. Three
about at will in your Sprii
ampus wardrobe.
anIelles"

Dress . . . 14.95
Middy Blouse 6.50
Shirt . . . 5.00

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"Here's the'
SPECTATOR
BROWN and WHITE 95
BLUE and WHITE
PATENT and WHITE
With a foot-shortening .:ng
"BOOMPS TOE" and elasti-
cized to really fit! Snowy
BUCK with smooth CALF! The
spectator you'll "live in for
months to come!
seen in Vogue, Esquire,
Mademoiselle

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Campa.3

.§'cart (c

For Spring

or reii -up ear

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Our new series of youthful
shoes for feet that go places.
Full of flattery, with their
rounded toes and slanting
peg-top heels that make your
feet so Cinderella-like.
1. Navy or black gabardine with
patent.
2. Navy or brown gabardine with
saddle calf; black with grey
snake.
3. Natural brown alligator-calf.
4. Navy or black gabardine with
patent; brown with snake.
5. Navy or black gabardine with
grey snake.

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If you were at the style sl
Thursday night, you coul

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