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March 14, 1941 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1941-03-14

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1941

Engineering Committee Renews Plans For Cooley Foun

lation

Stove Company Strike Brings Huron River
Big City' Worries To Ypsilanti Traffic Bridge
By WILL HARDY sire of workers to return to their To BeRebuilt]
YPSILANTI, March 13-"Growing machines.
pains" of industrialism have stricken iHe is Douglas Jarvis, whose 13-La The arrival of G. Donald Kennedy,'
this century-old little college town month old son died Tuesday. Lack tm
mild of proper food and medical care wereIstate highway commissioner up for
for the first time and today its i the chief causes of the child's death. re-election. in Ann Arbor yesterday
conservative populace is frantically ( When investigators entered the with two other Democratic candi-
seeking a cure for the new trouble. Jarvis home, the only food they found dates furnished the occasion for an j
Nearly 650 employes of the United was oatmeal and biscuits, the latter important news announcement to
Stove Company, one of the three prepared by the mother. Ann Arbor.
factories located here, remained While funeral services for the in- Kennedy disclosed that the bridge
fant are being held today in Moiro over the Huron River and the Mich-
away from work for the 28th day the tension between the union and igan Central Railroad just north of
awaiting word from the National La- the company increases, and house- Ann Arbor on the Whitmore Lake
bor Relations Board officials in wives and business-men, whose pre- Railroad will be rebuilt.'
Washington. Decision of the Board vious experience with labor trouble Preliminary plans are being made
on the issue of the strike-whether has been limited to news dispatches, for a project that will reconstruct
or not the CIO can legally bargain are now living first-hand in a setting the bridge so there will be four lanes
with the company-has been expect- which parallels that in John Gals- of traffic in addition to walks for
ed for several days. Meanwhile, the worthy's "Strife. I pedestrians.
citizenry has tried in its own way to The strike was called Feb. 13 when Those who accompanied the high-
cajole the labor leaders into permit- K. V. Ferguson. respected president waThossonerconitheigh-
ting work to continue until the deci- of the firm, refused to negotiate with way commissioner n this quiet camF.
sion is rendered. These efforts have Local 769 of the UAW-CIO. Last pain trip Were Dr. Charles F.
Kn m darlid at fn th1 Statn

Arrangements

Technic Issue

Were Started Will Feature,
By Anderson Study Methods
Group Plans Expansion Articles on study methods, sun
O spots, gear finishing and the Univer-
Of Ne Buili sity's new electron microscope are
Sy dtoNewWing, Buildin all included in the sixth issue of the!
R. A - AW rVNT Michigan Technic, official Engineer-

DNAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1941
VOL. LI. No. 115
Publication in the Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University.
Notices

Relief Group
To Hold Drive
March 24-30
Burke, Reichert Selected
As Heads Of Ann Arbor
Greek War Association

12,y A. . n A *x

i=

Renewing plans for the launching
of the Mortimer E. Cooley Founda-!
tion here to help expand the College
of Engineering, booklets have been
sent to more than 17,000 former stu-
dents during the past month ex-
plaining the problems and objectives
of the engineering school.
Arrangements for the creation of-
the Cooley Foundation were begun
two years ago by the late Dean Hen-
ry C. Anderson of the Engineering
College, but were halted soon after
his death. The newly created Foun-
dation committee is operating under
the direction of Prof. A. E. White,
director of the enginevring research
department.
Object Expressed
The object of the committee at
the present time as expressed by
Dean Ivan C. Crawford, "is to urge

ing College publication,
go on sale Monday.
The study methods sto
"For Students Only," is a
of short papers on hov
presented by various s
members of the faculty."
deals with a theory whi
advanced to explain thi
non and "Gear Finishing
eral newly developed indu
ods.
"30,000 X" is the titl
W. C. Dobson's story on
scope which will enable
view objects magnified3
The March "Techni
section contains short bi
Prof. R. A. Dodge of the
mechanics department;
f Britton, 41E, business3
the Technic and a mem

which will I Faculty, School of Education: Thet Campaign preparations for a war
March meeting of the Faculty will be relief drive in Ann Arbor were an-
held on Monday, March 17, at 4:15 nounced yesterday with the forma-
ory, entitled p.m. in the School of Education
compilation Library. tion of a local chapteA of the Greek
w to study, War Relief Association to be headed
tudents v and Interviews with Katharine Gibbs by George Burke, honorary chairman
"Sun Spots" School Director: Miss Helen Shell, and Rudolph Reichart as chairman.
ch has been Director of Katharine Gibbs School, The drive will be held March 24-
s phenome- will be on the campus Saturday morn- 30 and will seek to raise funds for
," with sev- ing and Monday. Any women inter-b.c.
istrial meth- ested in a secretarial course at the both military and civilian aid. Every
Katharine Gibbs School may inter- cent raised will be. sent to Greece
e of Arthur view Miss Shell by making an ap- since the local Greek-Americans will
the micro- pointment in the office of the Dean pay all campaign expenses.
scientists to of Women. Besides Mr. Burke and Mr. Reich-
30,000 times. -- art, the executive committee is com-
c Presents" Public Health Nursing Certificate posed of Dr. Harley Haynes, vice-
ographies of Candidates for June 1941 must make chairman: Charles Preketes, presi-
engineering application at the office of the School dent; Theodore Dames, vice-presi-
Harold E. of Education, 1437 U.E.S., if they dent; Paul Koken, and Reardon
manager of have not already done so. Peirsol, cQ-secretaries; Mrs. Earl

T
}
,
1
'1

failed, but at least one of the em-
ployes has expressed the growing de-

June, Ferguson signed a contract ..rumaa3
JunhisFemguloyes, tvigd wer tn Board of Agriculture and Charles F.
with his employcs, who were then Hmn.icmetcniaefr
affiiatd wth he FL.Hemans. incumbent candidate forl
affiliated with the AFL. h badofrgIt.
Several ,months ago the Local the board of regents.
swited allegincths o the I ad Kennedy also disclosed that in con-
when more active officials of the junction with plans for a crosstown
new parent organization. asked for motorway in Detroit, an express
newpini ornzain ase f highway from Detroit to Chicago is
baraiiz :herigs Fergusn r-

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

nber of Tau

- -- - IA AI
TYPING -18{
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416 14c
TYPIST. Experienced. L. M. Hey-
wood, 414 Maynard St. Phone 5689.
27c
HELP WANTED
WANTED -Experienced studentl
waiter. Apply at the Kenmore, 300
S. State.
IOLA STEIN-Experienced legal
typist, also mimeographing. Notary
public. Phone 6327. 706 Oakland.
TYPING and duplicating service.
Dorothy Testa, M.A., 625 East Lib-
erty (at State), Rn. 1. 2-1835. Re-1
ports, theses, dissertations, briefs.;
22c j
TAILORING & PRESSING-12
DRESSMAKING and alterations.
Coats relined. Also sewing of all
kinds. Call Mrs. Ream, 8653. 23c
STOCKWELL residents-Skilled al-
terations promptly done. Just
across the street. Phone 2-2678.
A. Graves. 28c
FOR SALE
1939 PLYMOUTH DELUXE, 2-door,
radio, heater, air horns, excellent
care. Very reasonable. Call 6252
days; evenings 3175. 302
1935 FORD COUPE for sale. New
piston rings, bright black finish,
28,000 honest miles, good tires. Full
price for cash $150. Call Paul
Chandler or write Michigan Daily,
Box 42. 306
FINE residential property offered for
sale for first time. Located 1020
Ferdon Road near Washtenaw
Avenue. Property shown by ap-
pointment only. Phone 2-1430,
James G. Hays, Executor. 308
LAUNDERING,
LAUNDRY-2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 3c
STUDENT LAUNDRY-Special stu-
dent rates. Moe Laundry, 226
South First St. Phone 3916. 100
MISCELLANEOUS-20
THESIS BINDING- -Mimeographing.
Brumfield & Brumfield, 308 S.
State. 19c
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL--
Driveway gr vel, wasied pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 5c

1used on legal grounds.
The union pressed the issue, con-I
tended that wages had been de-
creased instead of raised, and the
walkout followed.I
Union officials expect that theI
NLRB will order an election. That
their membership is strong enough
to swing the vote is generally con-
ceded here. They claim 600 mem-
bers.
Circuit 'Judge George W. Samplel
issued an order restraining pickets
at the United Stove Co. plant in
Ypsilanti from interfering with the
operation of the plant and from
blocking entrance of non-striking
employes to the factory.
Committee Of Coops
To }Hold Interviews
w-.aa - *s 1 1 T - *,a

proposed which will possibly pass Ij e lunitoge- i tuc w hth [Beta Pi and Vulcans and James V.
through the Ann Arbor area. College to learn its varied objectives Winkler, '41E, also a member of both
and problems; and to join loyally Tau Beta Pi and Vulcans.
T TJ with its officers in an attempt to in- The editorial describes and sup-
crease its usefulness by securing the ports the Engineering Council's Open
Sigm a Aea active interest of business men, pot h Egnein onilsOe
aiveeismnufasturerusnds tien- House exhibition which will be held
gineers, manufacturers and citizens here on Friday and Saturday, March
TO S eak H ere who desire to endow worthwhile ef- 28 and 29.
forts.-
Sr D cThe proposed expansion of the Col- -
Ellery To Discuss Matters, lege of Engineering would entail the Do
.LLifl N o Inportan Ie construction of a new hollow quad- Di VcI blci
Of National hIportance rangle building on East University I
'Sigma Xi Matters of National Avenue, at the left of the present To Talk H ere
igmrtan"XiMaterdsossNdtbynDlEast Engineering Building; and a
Importance" will be discussed by Dr. T-shaped addition on South Univer- -
Edward Ellery, national president of
Sigma Xi, honorary research society, sity Avenue to the West Engineering Aid-To-Allies Committee
at 8 p.m. tomorrow in the Amphi- Building. WillSpno Letr
ekWill Supplement Funds Sponsor Lecture
theatre of the Rackham Building. Geealojctvs-fte-on
-General objectives of the Foun-
Earlier, at 6 p.m. in the Union. dation, as has been approved by the The Ann Arbor chapter of William
the members of the local chapter of Board of Regents, are as follows: Allen White's Committee to Defend
the organization will sponsor a din- 1. To supplement the funds pro- America by Aiding the Allies will
ner for Dr. Ellery. Reservations can vided by the State of Michigan to ! sponsor a talk by Dr. Robert H. Mc-
1-iiqj'g jxt uitn ..3 1~ ma .e oy caning T).9 '. T~,.1vereT.t-_41

Certificates of Eligibility: Partici-
pants in public activities are remind-
ed that first semester eligibility cer-I
tificates are good only until March 1.
Second semester eligibility certificates
j should be secured before March 15.
May Festival Tickets: Subscribers
of record to Patrons' Tickets ($12.00
seats) for the current Choral Union
Concert Series, to whom special or-
der blanks were mailed under date
of February 8, are respectfully re-

Cress and Mrs. Suzanne Bezirium, co-
assistant secretaries; Leonard Tappe,
treasurer; and Angelous Poulous,
assistant treasurer.
The advisory council is composed
of Ira Smith, Shirley Smith, Dr.
Frederick Coller, Cone Lighthall,
Earl Cress, William Brown, George
Langford, John Panarites, Judge
George W. Sample, Frank Preketes,
Nima Perros, Peter Raft, Clyde
Fleming, Rev. M. Kontoleon, Frank
DeVine and Herman Gross.

4

I

minded that the "deadline" for re- Kanoshero To Gi
taining the same seat locations for
the May Festival expires Saturday, Talk On MP lB
March 15, at noon. Unless orders "9
are received not later than that date, -
the particular seat locationsacannot "Life in the Philippines" is the title
be guaranteed. Orders from all other of a lecture to be delivered by Kyosti
(continued on Page 4) Kanoshero, Grad., before a meeting
of the Suomi Club at 8:00 p.m. to-

i }mor (ltGin U f RfIO be made by calling Prof. F. L. Everett
of the engineering mechanics depart-
The Personnel Committee of the it Eleres talk will deal with
Intercooperative Council will hold r. Euberys tl wi deatwit
various subjects on which chapter,
interviews at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow in counsel is needed and desired in-
Room 306 of the Union for all stu- eluding the use of financial resources
dents desiring either to room or to promote research, grants-in-aid,
board at cooperative houses this se- national lecturers, the publishing of
mester. national lectures and the practices of
Those planning to apply for co-op electing "associates" and "members"
vacancies are urged to contact Laur- into the society.
ence Mascott, '41, chairman of the
committee at 7350. Following the in-
terviews applicants will be assigned Army ROTC Unit
to one of the co-ops for final ap- Picks Five-Man Team
proval.

such an extent as may be necessary Dowell, research associate in Meso-
to insure the maintenance of a strong potamian Archaeology, at 4 p.m.
and adequate faculty for undergrad- Sunday in the lecture hall of the
uate teaching in all branches of en- Rackham Building.
gineering, and the furnishing to that Entitled "Turkey's Part in the
t Present Struggle," the talk will con-
faculty of proper and ample facili- enTre' oe sa i oBi-
tiesand aboator equipmnt.cern Turkey's role as an aid to Brit-
ties and laboratory equipment. amn and the conditions which may
2. To encourage and foster grad- nd te Eodton which.may
uat wok i eninerin byproviding 1i nfluence Near Eastern policy. He
uate work in engineering by will also discuss the part Turkey
such supplementary funds as will se- may play after the completion of
cure and retain teachers of outstand- hostilities
ing ability and provide them with Dr. McDowell, whose particular
physical equipment second to none. field of interest is the economic his-
3. To encourage fundamental re- tory of both the ancient and modern
search in pure and applied science by Near East, has been connected with
all faculty members, and to provide the University's archaeological ac-
the necessary space and equipment tivities since 1928. Prior to that date
for adequate approach to every re- he was engaged in business in the
search problem. Balkans and Near East for six years.
4. To encourage the making of During the first World War, Dr.
special grants to the College of En- ' McDowell served in Iran, the Cau-
gineering for the establishment and casus and Turkey doing war relief
support of libraries, laboratories, work, later receiving a post in the
museums and other instrumr.ents of j British Military Intelligence Service
teaching, and for the creation of with duty in these same areas.
scholarships and fellowships for ad. -
vanced graduate work and research.
Tribute To Cooley Poster Drawings Shown

Botany Department!'
Announces Deadline
For Walker Prizes
Papers submitted to the Boston
Society of Natural History for the
annual Walker prizes must be turned
in and completed by May 1, the bot-,
any department announced yester-
day.
Entitled "Plants Useful to Man,"
the papers are eligible for the $60
first prize and the $50 second prize
from a fund founded by the lateDr.
William Johnson Walker If, the te
opinion of the judges, the first prize
paper is of exceptional merit, the
award will be increased to $100.
Stipulations of the contest require
that the work be the result of original
research personally conducted by the
author.
Submitted papers and requests for
information should be addressed to
the Boston Society of Natural His-
tory, 234 Berkeley St., Boston, Mass.

morrow in the International Center.
Kanoshero, a native of the Philip-

Board at the 12 cooperative houses}
now on campus ranges from one to
four dollars a week and working
hours from 16 to 30 hours a month.
Eight of the co-ops are open to men,
three to women and one to married
couples. Prices for both room and
,board are as low as two dollars al
week and as high as $6.50.
Or'atorical Finals

Five freshman riflemen have been
selected to represent the local Army
ROTC in the Graf O'Hara trophy
match with the Naval ROTC unit
Wednesday, April 9. They are David
Weisberg, '44E, Albert D. Engstrom,
'44, George D. Hooper, '44E, Charles
R. Chase, '44E, and George C. Va-
lette, '44.
The trophy, donated by the Graph.
O'Hara Post 423 of the Veterans of

pine Islands, will explain many of
the customs and traditions of his
fellow islanders.
Following the lecture the group
will participate in games, and re-
freshments will be served, Kenneth
Repola, '43, president of the club,
announced.
Call 6300
^- for Reservations
ARTKINOptsent
A Great Man-
.A Great Writer-
,AGreat Fitm!
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Tonight & Saturday at 8:30
Admission 35c
Tickets at Box Office

W i1Be Sun Foreign Wars, symbolizes "a stimulus
1 i f7 to the spirit of competition between
the army and navy units to aid them
District finals in the National in developing good marksmanship."
Hillel Oratorical Contest will be held
at 3 p.m. Sunday at the local Hillel a Tk ,
Foundation. Gr ( eats . Tae Courses
Winners of local contests at Mich- I Dean Ivan C. Crawford of the Col-.
igan State Normal College and Mich- lege of Engineering announced yes-
igan State College will compete in terday that more than 300 engineers,
the contest to determine the district a large percentage of whom are col-
representative who will be sent to lege graduates, had applied for in-
compete in the Chicago finals. struction in the nine National De-
Stdenits planning Ito enter should fense courses which are being offered
call the Foundation before inlday, I by the University in Detroit,
Orati n7 must i e of about eilhitiniti-

i

The Foundation is a tribute to Depicting the evolution of the
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, former modern poster, an exhibition of pos-
dean of the College of Engineering, ter drowings is being shown daily
who served the University successive- from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. in Alumni
ly as Professor of Mechanical Engin- Memorial Hall, under the sponsor-
eering and Dean of the 43 combined ' ship of the Ann Arbor Art Associa-
Colleges of Engineering and Archi- tion.

tecture.
A graduate of the United States
Naval Academy, Dean Cooley has
held numerous civil as well as mili-
tary posts. He is former president
of the Ann Arbor Council and has
served in imuportait posts inmanly
enginecring societies.

i,

utes duration and should contain
original matter on some subject of
Jewish interest.
Today and Saturday
JEAN ARTHUR
"ARIZONA"

MICHIGAN

h- -
I4
cap
Friday Evening
March 21st
Pricer e$ 50
Per Couple

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YOU CAN
COUNT IT
QN YOUR
FINGERS

The uniber of days till SPRING.
This is the time to change to your SPRING wardrobe. So keep
an eye on the MICHIGAN DAILY for the latest in SPRING
merchandise. We will keep you posted on the latest styles and
trends as well as where to find what you want at a price

1 l u II . 'WJI5 1 c It

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