100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 28, 1939 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LY, SEPT. 2a' 1989 - T
cation For Living' Is Keynote
In New Program Of Study Here,

ICHI¢GA

!a .

DAILY

OFFICIAL BULLETIN

SBy HER VIE HAUFLEIt
"What every young person should
kno 'would be an appropriate title
for a program. of study offered to
students for the first time this year.
Planned by Mrs. Samuel T. Dana,
wife of lean Dana of the rorestry
school, the program stresses courses
that provide practical knowledge of
living, studies that will enable young
men and women to successfully solve
the problems of domestic life.
With the cooperation of President
Ruthven and Dean Edward H. Kraus
of the literary college, a committee
was appointed last spring to select
from the announcements of the vari-
ous schools those courses which would
be generally helpful in "education
for living." The committee was
composed of three members of the
faculty of the literary college and
three members of the Ann Arbor
branch of the American Association
of University Women.
The program was originally con-
ceived as being applicable only to
women students. As Mrs. Dana said
in a recent issue of the Alumnus
Quarterly Review: "Even though pio-
neers like Emma Willard and Mary
Lyon maintained that women should
be better educated in order to be
better wives and mothers, higher
education for women has come to
follow very largely the narrow limits
of professional training of men's edu-
cation."
Mrs. Dana's aim was to remedy
this situation for women. However,
the men of thecommittee declared
that young men needed the informa-
tion contained in most of the courses
as much as the women, and it was
titled simply of interest to home-
makers.
The list of courses, so selected that
it will. not interfere with the main
lines of the student's specialization,
is alphabetical beginning with De-
sign 21 and 35 which are taught in
the College of architecture. These
Seth Harrison
Heir Explains
Scholarships
More light was thrown on'the cir-
cumstances attending the establish-
meht of the Seth Harrison Scholar-
ships in 1895, when the Alumni Asso-
ciation received a letter yesterday
.from a Harrison heir, Mrs. Helen
Lovell Million, '86, Menlo Park, Calif.
The scholarship fund was given
to Michigan by Mrs. Clara Harri-
son Otranahan, a daughter of Seth
Harrison, because this University was
one of the first to become a coedu-
cational institution; Mrs Million's
letter, however, indicates that Michi-
gan was chosen above other coeduca-
tional universities chiefly because of
her attendance here. She was the
second Harrison heir to matriculate
at Michigan.
The Seth Harrison Scholarships
were established for the benefit of
his heirs, to be used only at the Uni-
versity of Michigan. To date, 19
heirshold Michigan degrees. The
only heir in the University now is
Priscilla Abbot, 40.
The original $25,000 fund has grown
to well over $30,000, although from
two to four Harrison ,heirs have
made use of it every year for over
thirty years. This growth is due to
a provision requiring that every three
years the .unspent portion of the be-
quest be added to the principle'
Club To Hear Mr. Secord
Mr. Arthur Secord of the speech
department will discuss "Developing
a Sales Personality" before the Wa-
terloo Sales and Advertising Club next
Thursday, Oct. 5 in Kitchiner, Ont.
q . Ii

Dr. Kenneth N. Westerman
Mus.B., A.B., M.A., Sc.D.
VOICE SCIENTIST
Specialist in
VOICE BUILDING
FOR
SINGING AND SPEECH
Private Studio: 303 S. STATE ST.
Telephone 6584 for Appointment
I~-~

...
__
.,

study the most important type of.
applied art in such materials as
woods, ceramics, glass, metals and,
textiles, as well as those arts allied
to architecture, such as painting,"
stained glass, mosaic.
Landscape Design 101 is recom-
mended as an aid in beautifying the
grounds around the home.
The School of Business Adsi-nistra-
tion offers a course in the economics
of consumption (Economics 192)
which deals with the spending and
use of the consumer's income and
with the problems of consumers and
information needed by them.
The list also suggests a study of,
the psychology of child development
(Educational Psychology 0175) and
the mental hygiene of adolescence
(Educational Psychology 0120), which
deals with the cause, prevention
and resolution of the mental con-
flicts arising through the adolescent's
attempts to -adjust himself to his
environment.
Courses (Psychology 157 and 158).
which study the evolution of human
behavior from embryo to adolescence

are included, as is the critical sur-
vey of the more important facts of
mental derangement that throw light
upon the principles of general psy-
chology.
The need of every individual to
know something of what makes his
own personal clock tick is recognized.
by the recommendations of a gen-
eral course in the fundamental prin-
ciples of human physiology (Physi-
ology 1). For knowledge of the care
and cleaning of that clock Hygiene
101 is suggested. Zoology 52 is a
study of heredity.
Music 41 is an introduction to the
literature of music and is designed
for students who have had but slight
contact with the art and who wish
to gain a survey of the significant
examples of the several types of mu-
sical composition.
For community problems, the sug-
gested courses are: Landscape De-
sign 102, a study of city planning
and improvement; Sociology 54, a
study of modern social problems; and
Sociology 121, a study of community
problems.

Mr. Hitler's Polish Adventure Continues
-- - - ~ INLAN
d ALNN WILL RUSSIA
WEDEN sTONIA MAKE DEMANDS
ENSESONIA
PoL 15H UPPER -"SILESIA
t NCOAPORATEDMoscow
INTO REICH LATVIA
LITHUANIA
PavssEA SOVIET RUSSIA
GWARSAW ERMANS STORM
.A A.WARSAW DEFENSE
O RPOLANDV
5lSI$ A \ VET°l ~tl1
FRONTIER REPORTED
CLOSED TO TRAVELERS
GERMANY
SBUDAPESTE
HUNGARY s DESSA
RUMANIA .--
BELGRADE BUCHAREST
YUGOSLAVIA Black Sea
9LARIA
ITALY' *ANKARA
I pardanelles
TURKEY f'
Associated Press Map shows stage setting as Germany hurls what
it hopes will be the crushing blow at Warsaw in the "war" on the
Eastern Front. Nazis abolished remaining frontiers between Germany
and Polish Upper Silesia. The entire frontier between Russia and
Rumania and the 1Aussian port of Odessa (shown in shaded portion)
was reported closed to travellers.
Universty Expedition01 Discovers
Traces Of Prehistoric Culture

(Continued from Page 2)
two are to be appointed to member-
ship \on the Executive Committee by
President Ruthven.
b. Three members to the Library
Committee.
4. Consideration of the mimeo-
graphed reports of:
a. Executive Committee, prepared
by Professor Ralph A. Sawyer.
b. Executive Board of the Gradu-
ate School, prepared by Professor
Louis I. Bredvold.
c. Deans' Conference, prepared by
Dean Edward H. Kraus.
5. Consideration of oral reports on:
a. Administrative Board, by As-
sistant Dean Erich A. Walter.
b. Academic Counselors, by Assis-
tant Professor Arthur Van Duren, Jr.
c. Enrollment, by Registrar Ira J.
Smith.
c. Enrollment, by Registrar Ira J.
Smith.
d. Admissions with Advanced
Standing, by Assistant Professor
Charles M. Davis.
e. Summer Session, by ,Director
Louis A. Hopkins.
6. New business.
Edward H. Kraus.
Rules Governing Participation in
Public Activities Effective September,
1939.
I.
Participation in Public Activities.
Participation in, a public activity is
defined as service of any kind on a
committee or a publication, in a pub-
lic performance or a rehearsal, or in
holding office or being a candidate
for office in a class or other student
organization. This list is not intend-
ed to be exhaustive, but merely is
indicative of the character and scope
of the activities included.
II.
Certificate of Eligibility. At the
beginning of each semester and sum-
mer session every student shall be
conclusively presumed to be ineligible
for any public activity until his eli-
gibility is affirmatively established by
obtaining from the Chairman of the
Committee on Student Affairs, in the
Office of the Dean of Students, a
Certificate of Eligibility. Participa-
tion before the opening of the first
semester must be approved as at any
other time.
Before permitting any students to
participate in a public activity (see
definition of Participation above), the
chairman or manager of such activity
shall (a) require each applicant to
present a certificate of eligibility; (b)
sign his initials on the back of such
certificate and (c) file with the
Chairman of the Committee' on Stu-
dent Affairs the names of all those
who have presented certificates of
eligibility and a signed statement to
exclude all others from participation.
Blanks for the chairmen's lists may
be obtained in the Office of the Dean
of Students.
Certificates of Eligibility for the

first semester shall be effective until
March 1.
III.
Probation and Warning. Students
on probation or the warned list are
forbidden to participate in any public
activity.
IV.
Eligibility, First Year. No fresh-
man in his first semester of residence
may be granted a Certificate of Eli-
gibility.
A freshman, during his second se-
mester of residence, may bye granted a
Certificate of Eligibility provided he
has completed 15 hours or more of
work with (1) at least one mark of A
or B and with no mark of less than
C, or (2) at least 21/2 times as many
honor points as hours and with no
mark of E. (A-4 points, B-3, C-2,
D-1, E-0) .
Any student in his first semester
of residence holding rank above that
of freshman may be granted a Cer-
tificate of Eligibility if he was ad-
mitted to the University in good
standing.
V.
Eligibility, General. In order to re-
ceive a Certificate of Eligibility a stu-
dent must have earned at least 11
hours of academic credit in the pre-
ceding semester, or 6 hours of aca-
demic credit in the preceding ;um-,
mer session, with an average of at
least C, and have at least a C average
for his entire academic career.
Unreported grades and grades of
X and I are to be interpreted as E
until removed in accordance with
University regulations. If in the
opinion of the Committee on Student
Affairs the X or I cannot be removed
promptly, the- parenthetically report-
ed grade may be used in place of the
X or I in computing the average.
Students who are ineligible under
Rule V may participate only after
having received special permission of
the Committee on Student Affairs.
VI.
Special Students. Special students
are prohibited from participating in
any public activity except by special
permission of the Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs.
VII.
Extramural Activities. Students
who are ineligible to participate in
public activities within the Univer-
sity are prohibited from taking part
in other activities of a similar nature,
except by special permission of the
Committee on Student Affairs.
VIII.
Physical Disability. -Students ex-
cused from gymnasium work on ac-
count of physical incapacity are for-
bidden to take part in any public
activity, except by special permission
of the Committee on Student Affairs.
In order to obtain such permission, a
student may in ahy case be required
to present a written recommendation
from the University Health Service.
IX.
General. Whenever in the opinion
of the Committee on Student Affairs,

pL.**t y;JU yYlyy l4l l '.fl SACuVS SACA ul
to his college work, the committee
may decline to grant a student thej
privilege of participation in such ac-
tivity.
X.
Special Permission. The special
permission to participate in public ac-
tivities in exception of Rules V, VI,
VII, VIII will be granted by the
Committee on Student Affairs only
upon the positive recommendation
of the Dean of the School or Collegel
to which the student belongs.
X I.
Discipline. Cases of violation of
these rules will be reported to the
proper disciplinary authority for ac-
tion.

Psychological examination 1
Room 205 Mason Hall, 3 p.m.;
examination on Friday, Sept
Room 205 Mason Hall at 3 o
These examinations take
dence over all other appointm
cluding classes. Be on time.

Mail for Students, Faculty and tem-
porary residents at the University:
All students and new members of
the faculty should call at the U.S.
Post Office and make out pink card,
"Order to Change Address," Form 22,
if they have not already done so.
This applies also to temporary resi-
dents in Ann Arbor who may be do-
ing reference or research work on
the campus.
Unidentifiable mail is held in Room
(Continued on Page 4)
Fountain Pens
RI DER'S
302 S. State St.
Typewriters

XII.
Officers, chairmen and managers of
committees and prbjects who violate
the Rules Governing Participation in
Public Activities may be directed to
appear before the Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs to explain their negli-
gence.
Notice to Freshmen: Make-up ex-

or in the opinion of the Dean of the aminations for those students u
School or College in which the stu- missed the tests required of all
dent is enrolled, participation in a ginning freshmen will be given
ublic aetivit ma he detrimenta follows:

Still Plenty of

USED BOOKS

a#

Ulrick

1
S

(Opposite Engineerig Arch)

AT
7 Wit'.
.. { .. " . .

PROORT} ESTOCKINGS

ill,.....t * Y.$i:: t...'i; .: ;y xa r..r.r+ r? r° .":rt.: t ."..

...........
. . ......... .

Valuable indications of a prehis-
toric culture, dating back more than
11 centuries, were found during the
summer by a University of Michigan
expedition on the north shore of Lake
Huron, Prof. Emerson F. Greenman,
assistant curator of the Anthropolo-
gical museum, announced yesterday.
Composed of five men under the
supervision of Professor Greenman,
the group made its base at a prehis-
toric campsite near Killarney, Ont.,
a location where early American In-
.l.ti 6=nf ~llAnr #d T nhr lil d bha

near future to determine the origin
and exact nature of the strata, he
stated. Professor Stanley has as-
sumed responsibility for the geologi-
cal aspects of the .discovery.
"The site found this summer yield-
ed a variety of objects by which the
culture of the people responsible for
them can be determined," Professor
Greenman said.

c September PERMANENT SPECIAL 0
Regular $5.00, Waves
EUGENE - DUART $3 50
REALIST ICor MACHINELESS
SHAMPOO and FINGERWAVE
Mon. - Tues. - Wed. 50c Thurs. - Fri. - Sat. 65c
Air Conditioned for Your Comfort
CAMPUS BEAUTY SHOP y.
Phone 2-1379 711 North University Open Evenings

/
4r
r'C
pw.

.k J
.{

i

/

t
1
't
i
C
k

dians are supposea to naveve e
tween 1100 and 1400 years ago. "The
Killarney shore," explained Professor
Greenman, "contained pieces of pot-
tery and implements of flint and of
stone in what was apparently water-
made strata."
The presence of water-made strata
would indicate that the level of Lake
Huron once reached a point 26 feet
higher upon the surrounding shore.
The change in water level was caused
by a general uplift of the earth's sur-
face in that region, asserted Profes-
sor Greenman. However, he con-
tinued, the rock layers are not defi-
nitely established as having been
formed by wave action. He and Prof.
George Stanley of the geology de-
partment will visit the site in the

- --......-----
'f
4
}
k

6xclusive sorority nro

SWEATER & SKIRT

CLASSICS

.
j/

ANIMATE YOURoLEGS with the verve of Artcraft's
Frappe! It's a warm sunblush beige . .. especially
complementary in Feather-weight two-threads to
your new dress-up outfits. Formerly 1.15.

N owOnly 1.00 a pirr

. . . _

I

YOU ARE

INVITED TO

HAVE LUNCHEON AT
MITCH ELI'S
CUT-RATE DRUG STORE
THURSDAY LUNCHEON
NO. 1 Virginio Baked Ham, Lima Beans, Mashed Potatoes,
Bread and Butter. Coffee, Tea or Milk ......30c

/%
7/,
rt/
-7/
,/

CARDIGAN

$2.95 - 7.95

Ankle-Strap
SANDAL
$6.00
To make ankles bewitchingly
small. The cut-out charcoal
black of the suede, a pattei-n of
feminine witchery against sheer
hose. For afternoon or evening.

CLASSIE Sweaters and skirts that
score on sight!
Striking plaid or plain wool skirts
to match or contrast. 3.95 to 8.95.
You'll achieve that casual smart-
ness in pull-ons, 1.95 to 5.95, or
the ever-popular Sloppy-Joe, 2.95
to _795.

NO. 2 Veal Stew with Vegetable, Mashed Potatoes,
- . - .A f.± ..

1I

I

C,

I N

I ,I

.I

II

Cirg :...

t

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan