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January 24, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-01-24

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PAGE TWO
Entry Deadline,
For Hopwoods
Set By Cowden
Freshman Manuscripts Due
Friday In Prose Fiction,
Poetry, Essay Writing
Manuscripts for the freshman
Hopwood contest are due at 4 p.m.
Friday in the Hopwood Room on the
third floor of Angell Hall, Prof. Roy
W. Cowden of the English depart-
ment pointed out -yesterday.
Three types of writing-essay, prose
fiction, and poetry-may be submit-
ted. In each of these fields, three
prizes of $50, $30 and $20 are offered.
Any freshman regularly enrolled in
a composition course in the English
department of the literary college, or
in that of the College of Engineer-
ing is eligible for this competition.
Judges for the contest will be Prof.
Arno L. Bader and Prof. Louis I.
Bredvold of 'the English department,
and Dr. Frank E. Robbins, assistant
to the president. To facilitate the
work of the judges, the members of
the: contest will read all manuscripts
submitted, and will eliminate unac-
ceptable material.
Limitations on entries will be 3,000
words in the essay field, 10,000 words
in prose fiction, and ten poems in
the potry field. In the fields of
essay and prose fiction the student
is limited to two manuscripts each.
A student may submit manuscripts in
more than one field if he desires.
Each manuscript submitted must
bear a pseudonym. The entire entry
of a contestant must be accompanied
by a sealed envelope bearing this
pseudonym and enclosing the author's
real ,name, address and telephone
number. The envelope itself should
also bear the pseudonym.
Iit

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1 11 5 I I U ZI hA l1:. TlAT h.~±i.~~i JIl x --.,WDNDAY, JAN. 24,1840

Expeiment
Txerme n
By DAVID LACHENBRUCH .
Sportsmen of the north centra
states are greatly effected by the ex-
perimentation being conducted b
Mr. Karl F. Lagler of the zoology de-
partment for the University of Mich-
igan and the American Wildlife In-
stitute in the.field of fish predation
What is fish predation, and what
is its effect on sportsmhen? The prob-
lem which besets Mr. Lagler, in his
own words, is "to determine the ef-
fect of predators on game fish popu-
lations. In other words, how do
kingfishers, herons, watersnakes.
turtles and so forth effect the
chances the angler has of catching
fish?"
The questions of which species of
predatory or fish-eating animals are
retarding the production of more
and larger game fishes and how; of
controlling serious depredations by
fish-eating animals without killing
them, and of vindicating' hose ani-
mals formerly andd wrongly consid-
ered serious enemies of game fish
come within the field of Mr. Lagler's
experimentation..
And how does Mr. Lagler conduct
these experiments? On his numerous
field expeditions he catches alleged
fish-eating specimens and removes
their stomachs which he "opens up"
and examines under the microscope.
By analyzing the stomach contents
of hundreds of animals of the same
species, a general idea of the crea-
ture's feeding habits may be ob-
tained.
But -studying the contents of an
animal's abdomen is not always easy.
Frequently tiny bits of fish bones
are found. Because it is plausible
that these bones could have belonged
to virtually any type of fish, a keen
knowledge of skeletal fish structure
is necessary. Since in Michigan there
exist about 180 .different types of
fish, minute differences in skeleton
are. extremely difficult to distinguish.
The delicacy of the bony structure
of many fish necessitates Mr. Lag-
ler's using an unusual method to ob-
tain complete skeletons for use , as
standards of comparison. He puts
the fish whose skeleton he wishes to
obtain in a box containing several
of a species of flesh-eating beetles
which remove-the meat, leaving the
skeleton in perfect condition. These
skeletons serve -as --standards with
which t'o compare bone-particles found
within predatory stomachs.
Insects, plants and other animal
food also must be correctly identi-
fied, and are done so with the aid of
specialists called in to render assis-
tance. .
"To kill off any animal," explained
Mr. Lagler, "is poor conservation,"
takping as an example the watersnake.
Many anglers believe that the water-
snake feeds entirely upon game fish,
and popular angling magazines have
urged sportsmen to "kill them off."
Mr. Lagler's.analysis proved that the
Michigan waternsake eats some fish,
mainly those that were unable to
make a fast ."getaway," thereby in-
voking the law of ,natural selection,
capturing the weakly and diseased
fish. The watersnake also feeds on
large predaceous insects which prey
on game. fish. On-the other hand,
however, the snake devours some
game fish. It is necessary, Mr. Lag-
ler stressed,:to weigh carefully the
pros andcons to decidejust how the'
waternsake should be managed, if
at all.
A striking- illustration of .unusual
results of investigation in the field of
predation, Mr. Lagler cited, is the
experimentation on the snapping
urtle, popularly believed to -subsist
almost entirely on "game fishand

ducklings." In the first investigation
conducted in this country in 30 years
>n the food of snappers"we found,
surprisingly enough, that over one-
hird of the-food of several hun-
Ired specimens examined from all
(Continted on Page 6)

s In Fish Predation Here
valuable Aid To Aniglers

_ __
_ _
.. : . ,

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;.
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DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 24, 1940
VOL. L. No. 88
Notices
To All Faculty Members:
1. Life Annuities or life insurance
either or both may be purchased by
members of the faculties from the
Teachers Insurance and Annuity As-
sociation of America and premiums
for either life Annuity or life Insur-
ance, or both, may be deducated at
the written request of the policy-
holder from the monthly payroll of
the University, and in such cases will
be remitted directly by the Univer-
sity, on the monthly basis. The
secretary's office has on file blank
applications for annuity policies, or
life insurance policies, and rate books,
for the convenience of members of
the University staff desiring to make
use of them.
2. The Regents at their-meeting of
January, 1919 agreed that any mem-
ber of the Faculties entering the serv-
ice of the University since Nov. 17,
1915, may purchase an Annuity from
the above-named Association, toward
the cost of which the Regents would
rmake an equal contribution up to
five per cent of his annual salary
not in excess of $5,000, thus, within
the limit of five per cent of the salary,
doubling the amount of the Annuity
purchased.
3. The purchase of an Annuity
under the conditions mentioned in
(2) above is made a condition of em-
ployment in the case of all members
Of the Faculties, except instructors,
whose term of Faculty service does
not antedate the University year
1919-1920. With instructors of less
than three years' standing the pur-
chase of an Annuity is optional.
4. Persons who have become mem-
bers of the faculties since Nov. 17,
1915 and previous to the year 1919-
1920 have the option of purchasing
annuities under the University's con-
tributory plan.
5. Any person in the employ of the

University may at his own cost pur-
chase annuities from the association
or any of the class of faculty mem-
bers mentioned above may purchase
annuities at his own cost int addition
to those mentioned above. The Uni-
versity itself, however, will contribute
to the expense of such purchase of
annuities only as indicated in sections
2, 3 and 4 above.
6. Any person in the employ of the
University, either as a faculty mem-
ber or otherwise, unless debarred by
his medical examination may, at his
own expense, purchase life insurance
from the Teachers Insurance and An-
nuity Association at its rate. All life
°nsurance premiums are borne by the
individual himself. The University
makes no contribution toward life
insurance and has nothing to do with
the life insurance feature except that
it will if desired by the insured, de-
duct premiums monthly and remit
the same to the association.
7. The University accounting of-
fices will as a matter of accommoda-
tion to members of the faculties or
employes of the University, who de-
sire to pay either annuity premiums
or insurance premriurs monthly, ae-
duct such premiums from the pay-
roll in monthly installments. In the
case of the so-called "academic roll"
the premium payments for the

months of July, August, September,
and October will be deducted from
the double payroll of June 30. While
-the accounting offices do not solicit
this work, still it will be cheerfully
assumed where desired.
8. The University has no ar-
rangements With any insurance or-
ganization except the Teachers In-
surance anid 'Annuity' Association of
America and contributions, will not
be made by the University nor can
premium payments be deducted ex-
cept in the case of annuity or insur-
ance policies of this association.
9. The general administration uf
the annuity and insurance business
has been placed in the hands of Sec-
retary of the University by the Re-
gents.
Please communicate with the un-
dersigned if you have not complied
with the specific requirements as
stated in (3) above.
Herbert G. Watkins, Ass't Secy.
Applications in Support of Re-
search Projects: To give the Research
Compmittees and the Executive Board
adequate, time for study of all pro-
jposals, it -is requested that faculty
members having projects needing sup-
port during 1940-1941 file their pro-
posals in the Office of the Graduate
(Continued on Page 4)

*

a

Ir

Always Within Reach

4

(44",

Mr. Karl F. Lagler, experimenting here under the sponsorship
of the American Wildlife Institute in the field of fish predation, is
exploding many popular myths about fish-eating Pnimnals. Ile is
shown here with snapping turtles, on one of his field expeditions.

--- By JUNE McKEE
"The Women's Page" will feature
more "Feminine Facts" in its airing
today over WCAR and WMBC at
2;45 p.m. Marguerite Mink, '41, is
director, Nancy Harris, Grad., an-
nOu cer. Dorothy Caughey, '40, Janet
Burns, '41, Helen Ralston, '40, Mary
I ou McKisson, '41, Anne Kleiner, '40,
and Arleen Schumann, '41, comprise
the cast.
For the "Student Forum" broadcast
over WJR at 3:30 p.m. Prof. Preston
E. James,'of the geography depart-
ment, brings students selected from
his classes for an extemporaneous
round-table discussion. Tom Har-
mon, '41, announces.
From the fan-mail of last Friday's
"Game of the Week" we find Morris
Hall now rechristened almost unan-
imously "Lawrence Hall," with a few
"Forrest," "Morse," and "Horse Hall"
variations, and even occasional "Mor-
ris Hotel." Also, "Mr. Laurence Hall"
is at present receiving much of the
mail "Mr. Morris Hall" welcomed . .
Orders for the recordings of Res-
pighi's "The Pines of Rome" played
by the University Orchestra in last
Sunday's concert, will be taken at
Morris Hall all week. If at least 20
people reserve records, two of twelve-
inch size will be sold for $3.25. If
40 people put in their orders, the
set will be available for $2.25.
As Tom Dorsey and Ted Fio Rito
will alternate in managing music forf
WJR's broadcast of the J-Hop, Donn
Chown, Grad, 'and -'Richard Slade, -
'41, have joint charge of the announc-
ing

ICLASSIFIED IADVERtTISINGj

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED.
ADVERTISING
RATES
Effective as of February 14, 1939
12c per reading line (in basis of
five average words to line) for one
or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per inser-
tion.
These low rates are on the basis
of cash payment before the ad is
inserted. If it is inconvenient for
you to call at our offices to make
payment, a messenger will be sent
to pick up your ad at a slight extra
charge of 15c.
For further- information sall
23-24-1, or stop at 420 Maynard
Street.
FOR RENT

GRADUATE LODGINGS. Fine Wash-
tenaw Ave. home to be opened for

paying
dents.
French
dinner
Daily.

guests and graduate stu-
Easy walking distance.
if desired. Breakfast and
included. Box C, Mich.
215

WANTED-TO BUY-4-
HIGHEST CASH PRICE paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146
TYPING- 18
TYPING SERVICE-Dorothy Testa,
M.A. 625 E. Liberty (at State St.)
2-1835. Reports, theses, disserta-
tions, briefs. 113
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408.5. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935. or
2-1416. 34
TYPING-Miss L. M. Heywood, 414
Maynard St. Phone 5689. 43
EXPERIENCED TYPIST wishes typ-
ing of all kinds. Immediate serv-
ice. 7c per page. 411 Thompson,
phone 4601. 159
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
. and notary public, excellent work,
706 Oakland, phone 6327. 20
ARTICLES FOR SALE-3

LAUNDERING -9
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16
ACE HAND LAUNDRY-Wants only
one trial to prove we launder your
shirts best. Let our work help you
look neat today. 1114 S. Univer-
sity. 19
TAILORING & PRESSING -12
FORMALS made or altered--special
rates on relining of coats till Feb.
10. Evening fittings at your resi-
dence if desired. Mrs. Gilbert, 339
John, phone 5820. 211
HELP WANTED
GIRL WANTED: For part-time
housework in exchange for board.
for board. For information phone
2-3933. 213
BUSINESS OPPORY UNITIES
CAMPUS Restaurant would make
good cooperative eating house for
students. All equipped, ready to
go. Neat decorations. Mr. Wis-
dom. Ph. 2-2112. 220
TRANSPORTATION -71
WASIED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Dri-veway -gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13

I

tTELEPH:ONEI
'Though Mother may live hundreds of miles away, she's
always within reach.. . quickly .,.,. by TELEPHONE.
Long Distance is the easy, economical, modern way to keep
in touch with home. Rates are low at all times . . lowest
nights after 7 and all day Sundays. For rates to points not
shown below, see the telephone directory (page 5) or ask
"Long Distance" (dial 0).
RATES FOR THREE-MINUTE NIGHT AND
SUNDAY STATION-TO-STATION CALLS

ANN ARBoR to;

ANN ARBOR. to:

Albion ..... ...
Alpena.....
Battle Creek.....
Cadillac.
Chicago, Ill. ....

Columbus, 0.
Grand Rapids
Hillsdale . ...

$ .35
.60
.35
.55
.55
.45
.40
.35
.95
.35
.35

Manistee ........
Marquette .......
Minneapolis, Minn.

Los Angeles,

Cal.

Muskegon ........
New Orleans, La. ..

.50
1.65

. . $3.50
- . .60
. . .85
. 1.00

I

I

Houghton
Kalamazoo ....... .
Lansing ......... .
1dleer ...........

New York City ....1.00
O-wosso -.. ... .. .35
Port Huron .35
Saginaw . . .35
Sault Ste. Marie, . .80
Trave'se City .....-.60

CANDID CAMERAS
need special care.
See "Bob" Gach
Nickels Arcade,

BATCHELOR apartment now avail-
able to three men in choice resi-
dential section. Apartment con-
-sists of large studio living. room
with fireplace-2 bedrooms (one
with twin beds) and private tile
bath. Bus service within % block.
and garage space if desired. For
information, phone Mrs. Helen B.
Allen 9710. Mrs. Mary E. Norris,
8575. 226

Ona call for ivhichi the
charge is 50 cents or more,
a federal tax applies.
MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE

I.

I

-

,.

.

MICHIG

NEW Thrill Roi
With
tL ALTRS - LIONEL BA
LIONEL ATWILL " HELE N
.,s>.SAMUEL S. HINDS

ANghl
p6 2t >
RRYMORe t
GILBER EAr T

I

SI
Rt
FC

INGLE rooms for graduate girls.
First floor, 725 haven. 224
1OMS for girls, available now or
next semester. 123 N. Thayer, 1
block from Rackham Building.
Phone 6201. 225
OR RENT-928 Forrest, large pleas-
ant well-heated rooms for men-
double and single. Shower. $3 per
person. Phone 2-2839. 222

FOR SALE--black female
puppy, whelped Nov. 10,
great granddaughter Red
elligible for registration.
2-3788.

.- - - - - - - - t - ~-. - -,

cocker
Great-
Brucie,
Phone
214

STRAYED, LOST, FOUND -1
LOST-Black Parker pen, name
Wendell Baker in gold. Reward.
Call Mrs. Rogers, Mich. Daily,-
2-3241. 223

d

1'

(

I

Soon --
DUKE ELLINGTON
and SHOW

-- Corning Sundy -
TED FIO RITO
Orchestra in Person

)

CLOSE TO UNION-large, single
room. Quiet house. Only 4 men
kept. Phone 9081
ROOMS for boys, double and singles.
Reasonable. 420 Thompson. 190
FOR MEN: Suite for three with pri-
vate bath and shower. Also a
double room. Steam heat, shower
bath. Phone 8544. 422 E. Wash-
ing ton.. 89
FOR RENT-Single room for men,
$2.50. 907 S. Division. Ph. 5488
168

';9' a ,little i/kar'e 'n'i
Chieering a&'ut FO L L E TT'S
N 14 fkoks&iqin9 Polic#"~
Sell All of Your
BOOKS CASH

I

kL



®_

® _-

I

SNOW
MICKEY ROONEY
and Hardys in a
lIlflF3 hla ndnewhppyiit! "nff
iiinrFIJA®flv ~ndm ufltJ

I

I
I

NIl

[CE single room and board for
senior or graduate woman. Wash-
tenaw Apts. For information call
8841. 219
DR BOYS-Suite, a single and

III

II or EXCHANGE I

I

F

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