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December 13, 1939 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PA GE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Phi Delta Theta Annexes I-M Fraternity Mat Champi(

unship

Coach Keen Prepares Grapplers Winners Take
For Strepnil, Sched,,> A head Five Crowns;

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By GENE GRIBBROEK
Facing the toughest schedule his
squad has ever had to handle since
he took over the job of guiding Wol-
verine wrestling fortunes 14 years
ago, Coach Cliff Keen has ordered
work and plenty of it for his varsity
grapplers.
Ledby Captain and heavyweight
Forrest "Butch" Jordan, the mat-
men, strong in the heavier divisions
but glaringly weak in the lighter
brackets, will meet the Dearborn A.C.
Jan. 6 to open the long, hard grind
which they hope will stamp them as
a typical Michigan wrestling team-
which means top flight.
To Meet Navy
Newcomers on the Wolverine
schedule this year, besides the Dear-
born club, are Illinois and Navy. Illi-
nois will invade the Field House on
Jan. 13, while the Midshipmen are
slated to meet Michigan here on Feb.
24. Temple and Lehigh, met last
year, have been dropped from the
lineup.
Toughest obstacle in the Wolver-
ines' path will be Indiana. The
Hoosiers served notice on their Big
Ten rivals that they were going to
be hard to get along with this year'
. . .: ..

when they took the crowns in six
out of eight classes at the midwes-
tern AAU's in Chicago last week.s
Coach Keen testified to Indiana's
power when he called it "The great-
est team I've ever seen."
Need Lightweights
A small turnout in the 121- and
128-pound divisions, coupled with in-
juries that have deprived him of the
services of the best of the "little
men," is the biggest load on Coach
Keen's shouders at present. To avoid
the necessity of placing all his hopes
for a good season on the heavier divi-
sions, he has issued a call to anyone
under 136 pounds, who has mat am-
bitions, to report to the Field House
balcony.
The schedule:
Jan. 6: Dearborn A.C., here
Jan. 13: Illinois, here.
Jan. 20: Northwestern, here.
Feb. 10: Michigan State, there.
Feb. 17: Penn State, there.
Feb. 24: Navy, here.
Feb. 26: Ohio State, there.
Mar. 2: Indiana, there.
Mar. 8 and 9: Conference Meet, at
Lafayette, Ind.
Mar. 29 and 30: Nationals, at
Champaign, Ill.

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Psi U Second
Phi Delts Score 33 Points
In Attaining Third Title;
Wistert Wins From Olds
By GEORGE CHEFFY
Phi Delta Theta decisively won the
fraternity wrestling championship
last night at the Field House when
they rolled up 33 points to Psi Upsi-
lon's nine.
It was the third successive year
that Phi Delta Theta had won the
championship, although they were
forced to share the crown with Psi
U last year.
The Phi Delts took five of the seven
firsts in the meet, with Psi U and
Delta Upsilon, who came in third
with seven points, winning the other
firsts.
Wistert Wins, 9-2
The feature match of the evening
was the unlimited class champion-
ship. Al Wistert, Phi Delta Theta,
dethroned Fred Olds, defending
champion, by winning the decision
in an eight minute match. The
score, based upon the Western Con-
ference point system was 9 to 2.
In the 175 pound class, Emil Lock-
wood, Phi Delt, won from Don
Young, also a Phi Delt, on a fall.
The Phi Delts also won the 167
pound class when Fred Charlton
easily pinned Bill Comstock of Zeta
Psi.
In the 157 pound class Henry Sher-
man, Delta Upsilon, successfully de-
fended his last year's title by defeat-
ing HarryKohl of Lambda Chi Al-
pha, Sherman pinned Kohl late in
the match.
John Chapman of Psi U repeated
his last year's victory in the 147
pound class by pinning Alexander
Jett of Alpha Delta Phi. There were
11 contestants in this class, more
than in any other.
Begle Beats Anderson
Bob Begle, Phi Delt, won the 138
pound class in a very hard fought
match with Mauritz Anderson of Phi
Gamma Delta. Begle pinned Ander-
son in the last minute of the eight
minute match.
The 123 pound class provided one
of the most exciting matches as
John Stewart, Phi Delta Theta, won
from Ralph Ditchik, Sigma Alpha
Mu. Both Stewart and Ditchik had
numerous chances to win the match
but neither had taken advantage of
these opportunities until late in the
bout when Stewart finally pinned his
man.
Summaries by weight classes:
123: Stewart, Phi Delta Theta;
Pinned Ditchik, Sigma Alpha Mu.
6:10.
138: Begle, Phi Delta Theta; pinned
Anderson, Phi Gamma Delta. 7:16.
147: Chapman, Psi Upsilon; pinned
Jett,Alpha Delta Phi. 4:32.
157: Sherman, Delta Upsilon;
Kohl, Lambda Chi Alpha. 6:27.
167: Charlton, Phi Delta Theta;
pinned Comstock, Zeta Psi. 5:25.
175: Lockwood, Phi Delta Theta;
pinned Young, Phi Delta Theta. 6:07.
Unlimited: Wistert, Phi Delta 'The-
ta; decisioned Olds, Psi Upsilon.
PRO-HOCKEY SCORES
New York Americans 4, Chicago
Blackhawks 0.
Boston Bruins 3, Detroit Red
Wings 1.
Christ

f'

Unconstitutional . . .
Before this basketball season pro-
gresses any farther we're going to
make a suggestion to the rules com-
mittee.
This year, the powers-that-be
in hatching new plans to con-
fuse spectators and players alike
decreed that when a team is
fouled it may either accept the
foul shot or take the ball out
of bounds at half court. In the
case of two foul shots, the of-
fended team may either attempt
both shots or just take the first
and then take the ball out of
bounds. The purpose of this
rule was to stop intentional foul-
ing by a team that was behind
in the closing minutes of play.
In a case where team A was in
the lead, it would stall and in'
order to break up the stalling
efforts, the losing team would de-
liberately foul and thus take the
chance of gaining the ball off
the backboard and scoring it-
self.
But the new rule is definitely un-
constitutional. It punishes rugged
individualism. And it's unfair to or-
ganized fouling. The rule punishes
the wrong club. The real offender
is the stalling team.
The entire trend in basketball
in the past few years has been to
speed up the game. , First 'the
center jump was eliminated;
then the 10-second rule was put
into effect and then the bodily
contact rule which made block-
ing and pick-off plays easier to
work was accepted. All of these
raised the tempo of the game.
And if there's anything that

slows the play down it's the last
minute stalling.
In some cases it's longer than a
minute. We recall the Purdue-Illi-
nois game of two years ago when
Purdue stalled for 16 minutes in the
second half to protect' a five point
lead. If anything is punished it
should be the stallers. And now
the rule-makers take away the only
possible defense mechanism the
losers could apply-deliberate foul-
ing.
Aside to rule-makers: you needn't
act on this tomorrow. Just have it
done by Jan. 3. That will be soon
enough.
When the basketball team goes
East to meet the rising sun, Connec-
ticut State and Rochester this Christ-
mas, there will be a clash of two
fundamentally different styles of
play. In the East, coaches eat and
sleep constant passing until there is
clear shot. Never unless you're open,
they cry. Last year three coaches
went insane when their players took
one-handed shots. Benedict Arnold
never committed such treason as
these Easterners who flipped shots
with one hand.
Inthe Big Ten and more espe-
cially in the far West, players
look upon two-handed shots as
sissified and on the milk toast
side. Why on the Coast, scorers
only give one point for a two
handed field goal. Too easy,
they say.
"You can't make 'em unless you
take 'em" is their logic and it ap-
pears to have more than a .nodicum
of truth. ' So they flip 'em with
abandon and let the coaches' hair
fall where it may. And the balls
often fall through the baskets too.

1",

IN THIS CORNER
By MEL FINEBERG_

Alice Marble Outstanding Irish Defeat Wisconsin
Woman Athlete Of Year, SOUTH BEND, Dec. 12.-tom)--
NEW YORK, Dec. 12.-(")First Notre Dame's unbeaten basketball
choice of 54 of the 63 experts who team handed Wisconsin its first de-
voted, blonde Alice Marble made a feat in three games, 51 to 33, here to-
runaway of the Associated Press poll night. The Irish have wor four
to determine the outstanding woman straight. The home five ran up, a
athlete of 1939, her selection mark- 31-to-14 lead by half-time and tri-
ing the first time since 1935 that a umphed, though outscored in the sec-
tennis player has been so honored. ond half.
In second place was Betty Jame-
son of San Antonio, Tex., golf cham- "Service" Specialties
pion, who was selected for first place STEAK HAMBURGERS
by two experts and whose point total PIES . . . CHILI
was 55, leaving Miss Marble's mar-Sevc
gin the largest ever compiled by a JOE'S Snappy
winner in the history of the Associat- 332 S. Main Open till 2 A.M.
ed Press annual poll. ________________

1"

I

At Your ocal Dealer

fy01" the 0RI H
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CHRISTMAS by giving a lasting gift
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Drop in today and inspect these distinc-
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N.. MANGOUN
334 South 4th Avenue Phone 6878
o <o >_<:::::::>0 _ _ _ __>o<= < <;; :::::>o <::>

Students, Faculty Are Invited
To New MichiganSki School
Jim Hynes Organizes New Hynes emphasized that one need not
Enterprise. Ski Champ be an expert skier to teach a begin-
EsCning course. Anyone with a good
Heads Teaching Staff knowledge of the fundamentals will
be welcome. The school will concen-
By ART HILL trate simply on the rudiments of the
Slalom and Christiana may sound isport but jumping instruction will be
like obscure Balkan states to the av- given to those desiring it.
erage reader but to the winter sports Head instructor in the school will
enthusiast, they are integral parts of be Jack Keig, '42, a transfer student
the s winter sport of kings, skiing, from Montana State College. Keig
T- wmternr sport O i ngs, skting. was Montana's representative at last

L

His Favorite Gifts
AT BUDGET PRICES
SHIRTS - White and Colors
$1.39, $1.65, $1.85
BEAU BRUMMEL TIES $1.00
Others 55c - 2 for $1 .00

E
E
1

ieretoore, itzie s n asp eena one
by Michigan students but a lad named
Jim Hynes has discovered that this
has not been for lack of enthusiasm
but rather due to lack of facilities.'
Jim, therefore, intends to do some-
thing about this.
The first University of Michiganr
Ski School will shortly go into ac-
tion, Hynes announced yesterday. In-
struction will be offered to all stu-'
dents and faculty members, male and
female, who are interested and that
a goodly number are interested has
already been discovered. The cost of
the course will be three dollars for
the winter.
Rudiments To Be Taught;
Instructors in the school will be
Michigan students who are proficient
enough on the polished boards to pass
a little of their information along.
as Gifts

All Michigan students and fac-
ulty members interested in the
formation of a ski school, come to
the meeting at the Union at 7:30
p.m. today. Experience is not
necessary.
-Jim Hynes
winter's Sun Valley Ski Meet and he
also participated in the tryouts for
the last U.S. Olympic ski team.
Coached In Montana
Jack has had experience as a teach-
er already, having coached ski schools
at Anaconda and Butte, Mont. He
was also mentor of the Anaconda
High School team.
"I thnik we can make a go of this
with a little cooperation," said Hynes.
"A large group of Detroiters have sig-
nified their intentions of coming out
for weekend exhibitions. Besides
regular lessons, we intend to have
movies from Dartmouth and Sun
Valley and lectures by well-known
skiing experts.
Detroit Cagers Triumph
DETROIT, Dec. 12.-( P-'The De-
troit Eagles rang up their fifth con-
secutive victory of the National Pro-
fessional basketball league season by'
coming from behind to trip Sheboy-
gan, Wis., 48 to 39, here tonight.

PAJAMAS
Cefanese
ROBES -l
Beacons

- Broadcloth or
$1.65 - $3.50

Flannels,
$3.50

Silks and
to $8.50

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f " , i J N
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U--T

HOUSE SLIPPERS 97c to $3.00
it t
COOPER'S FINE HOSIERY
29c to 50c
WALK A FEW STEPS AND SAVE DOLLARS

for Everyoie
For the Ladies For the Men
COMPACTS ELECTRIC RAZORS
PERFUMES SHAVING KITS
COLOGNES BRUSH SETS g
NAIL KITS CAMERAS
TOI LET SETS PIPES
STATIONERY TOBACCOS
Complete Assort nent Whitan's
and Gilbert's Candies

Weber & Kuohn
122 East Liberty Street Phone 8020
WE DO FINE SHOE REPAIRING

The insistence of college men for a definite
type of clothes has influenced Finchley in
the designing of models, and the selection
of fabrics peculiarly and charmingly suited
to college life.
SUITS * TOPCOATS - OVERCOATS TUXEDOS
FULL DRESS t
$35
SPORT JACKETS $16.504 SLACKS $8.00 - HATS $5.00

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