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December 13, 1939 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-12-13

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WEDNESDAY, DEC. 13, 1939

THE MTCTTTEY AN DATT.V :

PAdlf Tom

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Ann Arbor

Here Is Today's
In Summary

News

Local householders again will have
the opportunity to compete for more
than 35 prizes awarded annually for
the best Christmas decorations.. .
this is the fifth Christmas lighting
contest sponsored by the Junior
Chamber of Commerce.
Choral singing, organ music, the
carillon and Christmas folk carols
are all, copbined in the program
for the city Community Sing to be
held the day before Christmas in
Hill Auditorium, Prof. Hardin A.
Van Deursen, of the music school,
song director announced.
Mr and Mrs. Burt Youngs, of
Ypsilanti, have filed separate suits
in circuit court against Frank C.
Lyson asking $13,000 in damages
sustained in an automobile accidentf
Sept. 14, 1938.
*4* * *
A wandering milk truck crashed
into a Broadway store at 4:20 a,.m.
yesterday, smashing two large glass
windows . . . the driver, Robert
L. Hale, explained that the emer-

Prof Williams
SpeaksToday
To Explain New Methods
Of Silvering Mirrors
Newest methods in silvering astro-
nomical mirrors will be discussed by
Prof. Robley C. Williams of the
astronomy department at a meeting
of the American Institute of Electrical
Engineering at 8 p.m. today in the
Union.
The electrical distillation process
of depositing thin films of metal on
mirror surfaces developed here by
Professor Williams will be explained,
and its application to fields other
than astronomy will be suggested.
The advantage of the process de-
veloped by Professor Williams lies in
its ability to deposit extremely thin'
and uniform layers of any metal in a
sheet only a few molecules thick. In
astronomy, in particular, this process i
has made it possible to replace the
chemically deposited silver surfaces,
which tarnished readily, by the alumi-
num coated mirror-
gency brake did not hold as the
truck coasted down the Moore St.
hill.

For 'The Man Who Can Take it'

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PRESENTING
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The Spoofuncup (above)-trophy for the most popular unpopular {
professor in the engineering school-is the prize for the man "who can
take it" best in the annual session at 6:30 p.m. today in the Union.
2,750 Suspected Rabies Cases
Are Treated Successfully Here

Ancient Greece
Is Described
By Dr. Nilsson
Dr. Martin P. Nilsson, professor of
classical archaeology and ancient his-
tory at the University of Lund, Swe-
den, in a University lecture yesterday
said that an astonishing number of
Greek religious festivals have agri-
cultural bases.
Speaking in the Rackham amphi-
theatre, the former rector of the
+University of Lund declared that the
Greek peasants, a majority in the
ancient state, initiated the custom of
dances in observance of such events
fas threshing and wine-pressing.
Corn, wheat and barley were Greek
staple foods and rural celebrations
were centered around these grains,
he said. Each season had its own
festival, Dr. Nilsson disclosed, empha-
sizing "that agriculture is the foun-
dation of our civilized life."
The custom of showering newly-
married couples with rice stems from
the Greeks, Dr. Nilsson said, although
the original significance that "grains
give fertility" has been lost.
U.S. Aloofness
In War Asked
By Kaltenborn
(Continued from Page 1)
League member was to be guaran-
teed"-and then named instances
where it was not enforced by the
Great Powers.
Mr. Kaltenborn said that he had
been "terribly discouraged by the
futile and cowardly surrender" to
Germany at Munich, for he believes
that "if Chamberlain hadn't trusted
Hitler then there would not have
been war."~
He described his interviews last
summer with French Foreign Minis-
ter Bonnet, who said "the real issue
is whether Germany can apply force
to secure whatever she wants," and
with the British Foreign Minister,
Lord Halifax, who admitted he was
"concerned with saving the British
Empire, not with protecting small na-
ions."
Mr. Kaltenborn summarized the
war's military aspects with the asser-
tions that Germany hopes "she won't
have to fight the war out, but will
be able to bargain for peace," and
that the defense lines on the Western
Front are absolutely impregnable
against offensive smashes. Of the
war in the north, he predicted that
Russia will not be able to conquer
Finland until winter is over and the
ice melts. The blockade, he said, is
already beginning to pinch Germany
and may yet be the decisive factor.
Botanical Club Meets
Prof. Bradley M. Davis presided
over a meeting of the Botanical Jour-
nal Club recently in Room 1139 of
the Natural Science Building. Su
Hsuen Wu, Robert Lowry, James Mc-
Cronie and Frances Wynne gave re-
ports.

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on
II Fur Coats
Easy Terms
0
FURS
hone 2-2619g

Dr. Emerson Points Out
Virus May Be Killed
By Vaccine Treatment
With more than 2.750 suspected
cases of rabies treated without loss
of a single life, the University Pas-
teur Institute under the leadership
of Dr. Herbert W. Emerson has set
a notable record in combatting one
of the world's most stealthy and
virulent diseases.
A disease so treacherous that no
symptoms are revealed until the virus
reaches the brain, rabies usually
proves fatal within four to ten days
after this development.
In the brief time left for life after
the brain is attacked, the infected in-
'lividual experiences difficulty in
swallowing. He gags and is par-
ticularly distressed when he tries to
drink water. His attempts to swallow
bring on convulsions of the swallow-
ing and respiratory muscles.
Such symptoms are followed rather
rapidly by an ascending paralysis be-

EXCLUSIVE
318 South Main . PI

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ginning at the hind legs in animals
and working up. This paralysis sets
the stage for death. Nothing can be
done to cure the disease after it has
proceeded so far, Dr. Emerson said.
All that the doctor can hope to do is
to make the patient comfortable.
A current fallacy among people to-
day, Dr. Emerson pointed out, is the
belief that rabies is indicated in a dog
only when he froths at the mouth.
This belief has no foundation. Less
than 40 per cent of those dogs afflict-
ed with rabies froth at the mouth.
The Pasteur Institute has based its
successful fight against the ravages
of the disease on the careful investi-
gation of each case under its super-
vision and the continued emphasis
on the use of fresh vaccine.
Vaccines can combat and kill the
virus while the latter is proceeding
along the nerves, not in the blood-
stream as is the common belief, to
the brain. The vaccine causes the
body, in a majority of cases, to build
up immune bodies which kill the- vi-
rus. Sometimes, very rarely though,
an individual does not respond to the
vaccine and his body fails to build up
immune bodies. Then, it is only a
matter of time before', the virus
reaches the brain and causes a speedy
death.
The Pasteur Institute has warned
people that bites by any animal
should be investigated. The location
and characteristics of such bites are
important. Face and head bites are
particularly dangerous. Multiple,
lacerating bites are liable to more
suspicion than superficial lacerations.
The Institute is aided immeasur-
ably in its task of combatting the
disease by studying the brains of
animals suspected of rabies. Only
in this way can the Institute dis-
cover whether a person bitten by a
suspected animal is infected.
Certain bodies-Negri bodies-
found only in the brains of animals
with rabies offer the clue. Yet, this
discovery is not as infallible as it
seems because an animal, early in
the disease, will not reveal them.
"We may have been lucky thus
far," Dr. Emerson said, "because or-
dinarily is the 2,750 cases treated
thus far, we might have encountered
some individuals unable to build up
immune bodies."
Fraternity Initiates Two
The Epsilon chapter of Tau Epsi-
lon Rho, national legal fraternity,
initiated Irving Carashick, '41L, of
Norwich, Conn., and Joseph Klein,;
'41L, of Detroit, at a meeting last
night in the Union.

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For Christmas gifts to delight discriminating feminine
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there's sure to be a wide selection of grard suggestions
at almost any price you wish to pay.
MAIN at Liberty Phone 2-4411
Be Satisfied With A MICHIGAN DAILY Classified

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Suede and Leather Handbags in
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accessory for her every ensemble.
A-fascinating assortmentsof gift ideas-
are assembled in our costume jewelry
collection. Many styles $1 and up.

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Luciern Lelong*s
j Colognes

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a fresh, woodsy tang, so
heavenly with furs.
Handclasp flacon. $3.75

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choice of five favored
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EVERY WOMAN young or old knows the flattery
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LUCIEN LELONG is only one of
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Records - the
AS Ideal Gift
Complete Operas
Famous Symphonies
Christmas Airs
Dance Hits, etc.
Victor, Columbia
Decca, Bluebird,
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35c - 3 for $1.00
50c-75c and up
Promnt. Courteous. Helpful Service.

our complete Cosmetic Department. Come in, look around, then take your pick
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