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December 01, 1939 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-12-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DEC. 1, 1939

St

Sudenits Turn'Thumbs Down'
On Proposal To Ban Hitchhikers

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Staff Organization Begun;
To Name The Members
On Five Committees
Organization of the production
staff of the Union Opera was begun
yesterday when Robert J. Goodyear,
*40E, production manager, named the
chairmen of four production commit-
tees.
The chairmen are: Properties,
Henry R. Clauser, '40E; music, Donn
Chown, '40; settings, Edward C. Bos-
ton, '40A; lighting, Mark S. Cheever,
'40E; and make-up and costumes,
David Gibson, '41, assisted by Alvin
M. Bentley, '40. Edward J. Hutch-
ens, '40, will serve as assistant pro-
duction manager.
Chairmen Select Aides
Each chairman will select a student
committee from the men who regis-
tered for participation in the Opera
during a talent survey conducted
early this semester. Announce-
ments of the committees will be
made within a few days.
The final auditions for parts in
the cast of the Opera were held last
night in the Union. During the five
days of casting, more than 150 men
tried out for dancing, singing or act-
ing roles.
Hoyer To Pick Lead
The task of Director Roy Hoyer
now is to decide which of the tryouts
will fill the shoes of "Madcap Lee
Grant," leading character of the
play, and of "Hedy La Tour," slinky
siren in the best Hollywood tradi-
tion.
If the demand for further audi-
tions is sufficient, according to Rob-
ert Mix, '40, general chairman of
the Opera, another period of tryouts
may be offered after Christmas Va-
cation.

National Opinion Survey
Reveals Popular Favor
Of New Travel Mode
"Going my way, Mister?" A flash-
ing smile, a pleading look, a well
trained movement of the thumb, and
the motorist is introduced tJ the
much toured and familiar sight of
the "thumber."
Theye1 has been much discussion
)n whether the hitchhiker should be
anned by law from the road. Per-
haps the largest group of Americans
who use this form of travel are col-
;ege and university students. In a
nation-wide poll taken in more than
150 institutions of higher education,
Jitterbugs Are Dying,
MSC Instructor Says
EAST LANSING. -(ACP)- The
jitterbug is dying a slow death.
Within six months or a year the
cave-man acrobatics and heavy,
rhythmic thump of the species will
be history, and civilized man will
have triumphed again, if the pro-
phecy of William Kimmel, instructor
of music at Michigan State College,
is fulfilled.
According to Mr. Kimmel, popular
music has always traveled in con-
stant cycles, changing from "hot" to
"smooth and sweet," periodically. The
jitterbug style is, or "was", merely
a novelty.
Fewer and fewer of the "animals"
have been noticed on ballroom floors
this fall, and requests for "swing"
and "jitterbug" tunes of last year
have definitely fallen off. "Sweet"
tunes characterized by slow tempo,
decided lift and substantial rhythm,
have superceded more bizarre tunes,
according to the leader of a campus
swing band.

80 per cent were against the ban-
ning of ride "thumbers" from the
highway.
Michigan's "four out of five" can
be used to designate the overwhelm-
ing majority who believe that hitch-
hiking should not be on the statute
books, according to results of the
latest study of campus attitudes con-
ducted by the Student Opinion Sur-
veys of America.
In those parts of the country
where cities and towns are more
widely scattered, making travel
more difficult, greater percentages
of students, potential hitchhikers,
opposed such laws.
The southern states, comprising
the largest of the six sections into
which the United States was divided
for this scientific cross-section,
voiced the loudest disapproval in
answer to the question, "Do you
favor laws prohibiting hitchhiking?"
New England students who live in
the smallest sections, were for the
most part in favor of such legisla-
tion.
It is significant that New Eng-
landers are the more wealthy stu-
dents according to figures compiled
in weekly polls by the Student Opin-
ion Surveys. These results show
that in this section of the country,
only three out of every 10 men and
two out of every 10 women have to
work for all or part of their college
expenses. In the nation as a whole,
nearly five out of every 10 students
hold some job.
Disease Study,
Class planned
N ew Metabolism Work
Is Open To Graduates
Notice of a postgraduate course in
"Diseases of Metabolism" to be given
Dec. 11-16 in the University Hospital
for practicing physicians was an-
nounced yesterday by the Depart-
ment of Postgraduate Medicine and
the Michigan State Medical Society.
This course is planned to acquaint
the practitioner with the fundamen-
tal principles of metabolism and their
application to the understanding and
management of metabolic diseases.
The material will be presented by
means of lectures, demonstrations
and selected reading.
Dr. L. H. Newburgh, professor of
clinical investigation in internal
medicine and Dr. Jerome W. Conn,
assistant professor of internal medi-
cine, will conduct the course. Assist-
ing them will be Dr. Frank H. Beth-
ell, assistant professor of internal
medicine and dietitians Frances
MacKinnon and Esther Leiberman.

'

Destitute persons crowded six district relief stations in Cleveland, complaining that food orders were in-
sufficient, that they needed coal, shoe repairs, and street car tickets for trips to hospitals in the city's relief
crisis. The woman at left is pleading with a relief administrative worker. At right is the worker's hand
which writes "yes" or "no" to requests for grocery orders, coal or other living necessities.

Michael Howsowick (above), 26,
of Muskegon Heights, Mich., took
off his coat, loosened his tie and
then told the Dies Committee in
Washington that he helped the
Communist Party to control the
American Youth Congress in De-
troit in 1935.

Let's Parkertize.
by giving Parker pens, pencils and desk sets
for Cbristmas. Priced from $1.25 to $15.00.
Many other gift suggestions.
BALL & THRASHER
229Sot State Street Dial 3955

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PRE -VACATON

Brenda Frazier, last year's soci-
ety glamour debutante drew oh's
and ah's when she modelled a Paul
Flato necklace embodying a $1,000
diamond (hanging on her neck) at
the Ritz-Carlton in New York. The
125-carat stone is owned by Harry
Winston and is part of a 726-carat
stone found five years ago. It is
reputed to be the largest diamond
in the world with modern cutting.

The longest and costliest labor dispute in automotive history, a 54-day deadlock between the Chrsyler
corporation and the CIO United Automobile Workers, ended with agi-eement on terms of a new working
contract.. Shown at the successful conference in De troit, left to right: K. T. Keller, Chrysler president; A.
E. Raab, Michigan labor mediator; James F. Dewey, federal labor conciliator; Philip Murray, CIO vice-
president; and R. J. Thomas, union president.

Tobaccos... Lighters...

Smokers' Sundries

....89
.. .98
.$1.29
.$1.69
.$1.75

"BAGDAD" Turkish
Water Pipe
39c
Bomb
Humidors
Copper Bronze
Chromium
89c
PIPE
Close-outs
29c
Values up to $1.00
RONSON
CIGARETTE
LIGHTERS
$2.49
$5.00 Value
11 ACL TD AVC

TOBACCOS
1 lb. Bond Street ..98
1 lb. Briggs ... .$1.02
1 lb. Prince Albert .69
1 lb. Granger ... .69
1 lb. Raleigh ......75
1 lb. Union Leader .59
1 lb. Dill's Best .. .89
Hold 1 to 12 Pipes
25% off
Also with
Humidor Combinations
Dunhill LEATHER
TOBACCO POUCH
$1.00 Value
69c
OIL SILK POUCHES
19c up

These are the men who guide Britannia. Britain's war cabinet includes, left to right, standing: Sir John Anderson, minister for home security;
Lord Hankcy, minister without portfolio; War Minister Hare-Belisha; WVinston Churchill, first lord of admiralty; Air Minister Sir Kingsley Wood;
Dominions Minister Anthony Eden; Sir Edward Bridges, secretary to cabinet. Seated: Viscount Halifax, Sir John Simon, Prime Minister Neville
Chamberlain, Sir Samuel Hloare and Lord Chatfield.
.. . .. ... . . ...i
.... .... .... .. .

$3.50 EVANS
Con bination
CASE and
LIGHTERS

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