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December 01, 1939 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-12-01

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DEC. 1, 1939

PAGE TWO FRIDAY, DEC. 1, 1939

Heller To Talk
For Religious
Lecture Series
Rabbi's Speech To Be Last
Of 'Current Problems'
Group Given By SRA
Rabbi James G. Heller, of the Isaac
M. Wise Temple, Cincinnati, will dis-
cuss "How Can Religion Be Saved
in the World Today?" at 8 p.m. Sun-
day in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
This lecture will be the final in
the "Religious Aspects of Current
Problems" series sponsored by the
Student Religious Association. The
.series was designed to approach
many problems and many viewpoints
of social interest today, and may be-
come an annual lecture feature on
campus, according to Kenneth W.
Morgan, director of the SRA.
Rabbi Heller, who spoke in Ann
Arbor during the Religion Parley
last summer has served as chairman
of the. executive committee of the
Zionist Organization of America, and
on the Board of Governors of He-
brew Union College. He is a gradu-
ate of Tulane University and has a
master's degree from the University
of Cincinnati.
A noted Zionist and authority on
the history and practices of Juda-
ism, Rabbi Heller's talk follows pre-
vious discussions on "The Churches'
Stand On War," and "Pope Pius
XII and the Modern Democracies"
1r

Auto Ban Rule
Was Opposed
At Its Outset
By WILLIAM ELMER
Thirteen years ago, the Univer-
sity Regents adopted a resolution
that the oeration of automobiles:
by Michigan students should be re-t
stricted to upper-classmen, files of
The Daily of 1926 reveal. To enforcef
this resolution, a committee of six
students and two faculty members
met together to discuss violations
of the ruling and to make special
allowances to students having real
needs for an automobile.
A year later, the Regents decided,
despite wide-spread student opposi-
tion, that the system was not work-
ing too well, and that violations were
out of control. At first sophomores
were denied the privilege, and fi-
nally in June, 1927, after the stu-!
dents had left town for summer va-
cation, the Regents passed a rigid
ruling that no students at the Uni-
versify could operate a motor vehi-
cle.
With modifications, this ruling
has persisted to the present day.
During the school year, 1927-28,
papers of that year show, student
opinion was definitely against the
ban. An editorial appeared in The
Daily in October, 1927, deriding the
rule and describing the reasons ad-j
vanced in its defense as pure rub-
bish. In fact, until the first semes-
ter of 1930, there was continuous
clamor for revision, if not retire-
ment of the rule.
But today, there are few, if any,
student remonstrances against the
ban, and outside of the few days
before and after vacations, and the
J-Hop week-end, the only students
who drivercars in Ann Arbor today
must observe strict regulations and
must have good reason for demand-
ing the privilege.

Airmen Leave Fra tern ities Wa d Five-Year Fi t
On ayton rip , Wge . . - -ear - gh
To Gain RecognitionFrom Un iversity
Equipment At Wright Field1
Is Center Of Interest I By EMILE GELE T:

More than 65 air-minded engi- Persons who think the fraternityl
neering students, members of the ogre is still a menace to the opera-
Lion of Americancollege shouldcs

Institute of Aeronautical Sciences,
are leaving by automobile for Dayton
today to see Wright Field, a materiel
division of the United States Army.
(An added attraction of the trip,
according to some, has been the sign-
ing up of two female aeronautical
students.)
At Wright Field the group will find
6,000 acres and well over 30 build-
ings to explore. It will have the
pleasure of inspecting some of the
newest aircraft equipment, research
developments and testing devices.
The students will visit the airway
field Friday afternoon and Saturday
morning, and then return Saturday
afternoon.
It is interesting to note that the
Aeronautics Institute, which is pro-
moted by various manufacturing and
research organizations in the coun-
try, has its largest undergraduate'
membership in the Michigan branch.

their perspective back over the Uni-
versity Faculty Minutes and Regents
Reports of the 1840's, as recorded
in the Michigan Historical Collec-
tions at the RackhamaBuilding, to
realize the ominous background of
this problem.
The mysterious "secret societies"
that struck terror in the hearts of
staid faculty members sprang from
innocuous literary clubs. Merely to
prevent the organization'of too many
literary societies the faculty included
in the Code of 1847 the passage, "No
student shall be or bebome a mem-
ber of any society connected with
the University, or consisting of stu-
dents, which has not first submitted
its constitution to the faculty and
received their approbation."
Upon the emergence of Chi Psi
and Beta Theta Pi as innocent Greek
letter societies in 1845 the faculty
had invoked the rule that new stu-

Classified Directory

dents must pledge not to join any
unapproved society, and hoped the
nuisance would become stagnant and
disappear. But refusing to be ig-
nored Alpha Delta Phi submitted a
constitution in 1847 and demanded
that it be approved or rejected. The
faculty did not choose to jump on
either side of the fence and stated,
"the faculty have no authority to
legalize them as a society in the Uni-
versity of Michigan." The alert
"Greeks" gleefully observedhthat the
faculty had simultaneously denied
themselves the right to prevent the
societies.
'Prohibition Of The Law'
The conservative faculty, however,
reasoned otherwise. When a frater-
nity asked University approval in
1848 it was told that it came "under
the prohibition of the law." What
law, no one knew. The following
year four students were expelled for
belonging to the formerly ignored
Chi Psi. Then the battle began in
earnest.
Ann Arbor citizens became exas-
uerated with the bickering and or-
ganized a group to lobby in the legis-
lature for an entire new University
administration. The Greek letter
men of the state protested the in-
tolerance of University officials, con-
demning the anti-fraternity law as
"an abridgement of the rights of
man." But not to be deterred, the
faculty submitted to the Regents a
long analysis of the problem which
contained the accusations (1) "the
history of the societies is a detail of
obliquities," and they are also (2)
"a monster power which lays its
hand upon every college faculty in
our country." The societies are (3)
"oligarchic in selection of members
and oppressive towards all not in the
organization." (4) "Meetings of these
societies are liable to become and
often are lawless and convivial," (5)
"poor student is cajoled and perse-
cuted into the societies and wastes
education money on badges, etc."
(6) "These societies are the sources
of mutual intrigues and jealousies."
Other Inclusions
Among other inclusions of the re-
port were solicited statements from
sundry eastern college presidents.
Typical complaints were that the

societies possessed an undeniable

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immoral influence and were collec- !
tively the greatest enemy known to
all college gcvarnments. One presi-
dent flared, "The fraternity is a
giant evil which in secret is blasting
the hopes of many parents." The
1Egents approved the report and
made ready to pass it on to the legis-
lature.
In the meantime, however, two
students with dispositions similar to
that of the modern "Lee Grant"
managed to filch the faculty report
and revise its phrasing so that it
was scarcely becoming to dignified
faculty members. The facetious stu-
dents then presented the report to
the unsuspecting senator from the
University district who duly took it
to the legislature. The hoax was
soon discovered, but not before it
had made an indelible impression on
the legislature.
Accusations Denied
While the legislature was in ses-
sion, the fraternity boys emphatically
denied all accusations made by the
faculty. On the other hand, 15 in-
dependents demanded that the legis-
lature leave the matter to the Uni-
versity and affirmed the faculty's
capability of settling the dispute. And
again the Ann Arbor citizens raised
their cry for a shakeup in the Uni-
versity administration. But all the
contention was for naught; for the
state senate refused to commit itself
on the controversy and dismissed the
arguments of both sides.

VAULT
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on All Popular Brands of
Domestic and Imported
WINES
in Single Bottles or Cases
DELIVERY SERVICE
Day or Night
Dif 8 n200
303 N. Fifth Avenue

Le Cercle Francais
Presents Comedy
"Un Arriviste," a one-act comedy,
was presented by the members of Le
Cercle Francais at their meeting
yesterday in the Romance Languages
Building.
The cast was directed by Robert
Sethian, Grad. Heading the cast
were George Kiss, Grad., as Georges,
Jean Gardiner, Grad., playing Mme
Maillart and Georges Sabagh, '42,
as M. Maillart. The part of Eugenia
was taken by Eugenia Paprin, Grad.,
Mme. Bernadin by Betty Ramsey,
Grad., and Mme. Julet by Fay Hoot-
kins. '42SM.
Members of the faculty of the
Romance languages department were
especially invited to hear the per-
formance of the play by Miguel
Zamacois.

SPECIAL GROUPS!!
Reserve Tables Now for
PANHELLENIC DINNER
The Haunted Tavern
417 E. Huron Phone 7781

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A refreshing drink any time of the year

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Effective as of February 14, 1939
12c per reading line (on basis of
five average words to line) for one
or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per inser-
tion.
These low rates are on the basis
of cash payment before the ad is
inserted. If it is inconvenient for
you to call at our offices to qpake
payment, a messenger will be sent
to pick up your ad at a slight extra
charge of 10c.
For further information call
23-24-1, or stop at 420 Maynard
Street.
ARTICLES FOR SALE -3
WILL SACRFICE my small Grand
or Console. Used nine months,
perfect condition. Will accept
terms from responsible party. Will
consider renting. Phone 2-2913.
102
LAUNDERING -9

LOST: Black and white Schaeffer
fountain pen. Bob Wagner, 2-2565.
LOST-Probably in Stadium. Pair
of woman's gold-rimmed pince-nez
glasses. Phone 3582. Eugene
Kane. 108
LOST-One small, round, yellow gold
Gruen wrist watch with metal
band. Reward if returned to Betty
Shaw, Martha Cook.
LOST-Black Eversharp pencil with
owner's name imprinted on it.
Finder please call Janet R. Clark,
2-2591. 109
LOST-Ladies' Gold Malthy Lissot
watch. Brown leather strap. E.U.
and Angell Hall. Reward. Phone
2-1146. 110
FOR RENT -5
CLOSE TO CAMPUS, large nicely
furnished, comfortable s u i t e,
gentlemen, or married couple. 115
N. Thayer. 107
TYPING-18

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P

OQ N

Phone 8270

SHOWS TODAY at 2-4-7-9 P.M.

Mats. 25c - Eves. 35c

LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned,
Careful work at low prices. 16
ACE HAND LAUNDRY-Wants only
one trial to prove we launder your
shirts best. Let our work help you
look neat today. 1114 S. Univer-
sity. 19
STRAYED, LOST, FOUND --1
LOST-Round ladies' watch. Ini-
tialed MSC; between Green Lan-
tern and 1004 Forest early Satur-
day night. Reward, Box 1, Michi-
gan Daily. 103
LOST-White gold Elgin wrist
watch, black cord band. Reward.
Barbara Fairbairn, 2-4547. 100
LOST - Horn-rimmed glasses in
black case Monday evening. Call
6760. 105

TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34
TYPING-Miss L. M. Heywood, 414
Maynard St. Phone 5689. 43
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist
and notary public, excellent work.
706 Oakland, phone 6327. 20
TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles,
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
MISCELLANEOUS-20
SEWING-Alterations. Also new
black taffeta evening dress for sale,
reasonable. Inquire 2-2688. Alta
Graves. 104
AMERICA'S GREATEST Clothes
Values. Richman Brothers, 121 S.
Main St. Phone 3831. 106
FOR EXPERT ALTERATIONS and
repairing see Gust Pracht. Ladies'
and gents' tailor. 626 So. Division.
Phone 7947. 111

TODAY

Student Rate Made
For 'Lincoln' Play
Specially priced tickets for the
play "Abe Lincoln In Illinois" will
be sold by the English Department
today from 9 a.m. to noon in Room
3223 Angell Hall.
The management of the Cass The-
atre in Detroit has provided a limit-
ed amount of regular $2.75 orchestra
seats for students at $1.65. This
offer holds only for the evening per-
formances Dec. 4 and 5. If the de-
mand for seats is sufficient a special
bus will be chartered to provide
transportation Dec. 5.
Raymond Massey, star of "Abe
Lincoln In Illinois," which is still
running successfully on Broadway,
will appear with the road show cast
in the Detroit presentation.
Tests Demonstrate
Economic Success
Of BargeShipping
The naval architecture department
has just announced that its three
years of test work for the country's
largest manufacturer of barges has
proved a huge success.
The new type of barge-flotilla that
was developed saved 25 to 30 per cent
in power for a concern which oper-
ates barges on the Ohio and Miss-
issippi Rivers. Enough fuel was
saved in one trip to pay for the en-
tire period of testing conducted in
the University's naval tank.
The tests were devoted to deter-

L

a

MICHIGAN

t 'I I .a

wit BOBS WATSON
RUTH HUSSEY
GENE LOCKHART

- Also
Pete Smith's
'Set 'Em Up'
Bowling Short

r
easuu

O.S.U.-MICH IGAN
FOOTBALL PICTURES

mining the most suitable shape for
the ends of barges and to working
out the best formation of barges for
flotillas.

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MARSHALL

CUT- RATE

DRUGS... ES......TOBACCOS

231 South State

FREE DELIVERY

Phone

5933

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Friday and Saturday, December 1 st and 2nd
POUND TOBACCO CIGARETTE SALE! 15c
SALE!
Briggs..........98c 8 Popular Brands Nestle and Hershey
Raleigh... .....79c 89c plus tax Economy Bars
Half and Half .. .69c
Prince Albert . . . .63c Include - Marvels - AvaIon 2 for 1 5c

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KUMPHREY BOGART

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