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November 30, 1939 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

F

PACE TWO

THE MICHIGAN D A Tt"v-

Tmu-; SDA'17. Nov- - m. 141-4

aT'T TF 1to 11TT\i A 1 V11 C91 j .5

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F

Army To TestY
New Applicants
For Air Corps,
Cadet Board To Examine
Students To Fill Posts
In Expanding Service
Opportunity for Michigan students
to enlist in the rapidly expanding
United States Army Air Corps will
be offered today when a Flying Cadet
Board convenes at the University to
examine eligible applicants for fit-
ness. The board will meet each day
(except Sunday) from 8:30 a.m. un-
til 4. p.m. beginning today through
Monday at the ROTC building.
The present expansion of t1-e Army
Air Corps according to Capt. PaulB.
Wurtsmith, president of the board,
is part. of a larger program to in-
crease national peace-tinie defense
strength.
Only Single Students Wanted
Only, unmarried male citizens of
the United States, who are between
t.e ages of 20 and 27 and who have
completed at least two years of col-
lege work can be accepted by the Air
Corps.'However, Captain Wurtsmith
,said that. only senior students or
those who must for some reason leave
school afterthea completion of at
least two years at college will be ex-
amined by the board. This provi-
sion, he explained, is to prevent any
student's abandoning his school work
for the sole purpose of entering the
Air Corps. .
Applicants Should Appear
Students who wish to enlist should
appear before the board as quickly as
possible. to: make an .appointment for
examination, Captain Wurtsmith
said. He added that the examination
will be one concerned only with physi-
cal fitness.
Applicants need have no experience
in flying to be accepted for service,
Captain Wurtsmith declared. All
cadets will be started in an elemen-
tary course, he said, with no distinc-
tion being made between those who
are able to pilot a plane and those
who are not.

Woman In Mimes? Decidely Not!

Three-Story Tenement Setting
Is ProblemOfScenery Staff

-Daily Photo by Bogle
Director Roy Hoyer's assistant is shown here demonstrating some
dance steps to a couple of Union Opera tryouts. Women are excluded
from Mimes, but Director Hoyer won't do without his helper despite the
ruling.
Opera Tryouts Compare Merits
Of Masculine, Feminine Figures

By RICHARD HARMEL and
KARL KESSLER
Under the vicious onslaught ofl
the modern career-seeking women
have fallen most of the traditions
once sacred to the Michigan male.
Even the front steps of the Union
recently resounded to the determined
tread of world-hardened coeds. Not
satisfied with this and other victories,
the "weaker" sex is now voicing de-
termination to "crash" that inner
sanctum sanctorumn of the harassed
male: the Union Opera.
The controversy over the Union
Opera has been raging for some
days now, but little has been said
about the ability of the Michigan
coed to add a vital feature. The in-
quiring reporters singled out some of

Classified Directory

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSI Fl ED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Effective as of February 14, 1939
12c per reading line (on basis of
five average words to line) for one
or .two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or,
more insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per inser-
tion.
These low rates are on the basis
of cash payment before the ad is
inserted. If it is inconvenient for
you to call at our offices to make
payment, a messenger will be sent
to pick up your ad at a slight extra
charge of 10.
For further information call
23-24-1, or stop at 420 Maynard
Street.
ARTICLES FOR SALE -- 3
WILL SACRFICE my small Grand
.or Console. Used nine months,
perfect condition. Will accept
terms from responsible party. Will
consider renting. Phone 2-2913.
102
LAUNDERING--9
LAUNDRY -- 2-1044. Sox darned
Careful work at low prices. 16
STRAYED, LOST, FOUND - 1
LOST-Round ladies' watch. Ini-
tialed. MSC; between Green Lan-
.tern and 1004 Forest early Satur-
day night. Reward, Box 1, Michi-
gan Daily. 103
LOST-White gold Elgin wrist
watch, black cord band. Reward.
Barbara Fairbairn, 2-4547. 100
LOST: Black and white Schaeffer
fountain pen. Bob Wagner, 2-2565.
LOST - Horn-rimmed glasses in
black case Monday evening. Call
6760. 105

LOST-Probably in Stadium. Pair
of woman's gold-rimmed pince-nez
glasses. Phone 3582. Eugene
Kane. 108
FOR RENT-5
FOR RENT-Campus, near Lawyers'
Club, 3-room furnished front
apartment, private bath, shower.
Adults. 602 Monroe. 99
1135 LINCOLN AVE. near Tappan
school, furnished lower apartment,
4 rooms, bath, heat, laundry, gar-
age. 98
'CLOSE TO CAMPUS, large nicely
furnished, comfortable suite,
gentlemen, or married couple. 115
N. Thayer. 107
TYPING---18
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416. 34
TYPING-Miss L. M. Heywood, 414
Maynard St. Phone 5689. 43
TRANSPORTATION -21
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL --
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
MISCELLANEOUS -20
SEWING-Alterations. Also new
black taffeta evening dress for sale,
reasonable. Inquire 2-2688. Alta
Graves. 104
SPECIAL-$5.50 Machineless Per-
manent $2.50; $3 oil cocona $1.50;
end permanent $1. Shampoo and
fingerwave 35c. Phone 8100, 117
Main. 36
AMERICA'S GREATEST Clothes
Values. Richman Brothers, 121 S.
Main St. Phone 3831. 106
WANTED-Woman graduate student
to stay in apartment with two
quiet H.S. girls during Xmas vaca-
tion. Faculty. Lewis, 2-2610. 109

the Union Opera tryouts in the
Union last night to ask:
1 THE QUESTION:
Do you believe that the average
coed has better proportioned figure
for theatrical work than the average
male student?
THE ANSWERS :
JamesANielsen,'40: "Pue to the
fact that the average male student
has outgrown short pants, you can't
really judge the masculine lower
limbs. Due to the fact that skirts
are shorter this year, we have had
an excellent opportunity to view
some of the monstrosities which sup-
port our so-called campus beauties.
The evidence weighs heavily against
the coeds."
Wiliam Sherman, Grad.: "The-
relative merits of men and women's
figures depends largely upon the
point of view, but I do believe that
women should be allowed to take cer-
tain roles in the Union Opera They,
can portray some characters much
better than could the average male
student. Imagine what would hap-
pen if a pant-bred husky should try
to dance in a skirt."
Gordon Laing, '40: "I don't be-
lieve there is much room for doubt
on the question of the relative merits
of male and coed figures in theatri-
cal work of this kind. The male bur-
lesquing a feminine figure is far
funnier than a coed would be in the;
same role. The whole effect is much
more hilarious-and the hairier the
better."
Neal Seegert, '41: ",Women are
much better proportioned than men
-I might also add that their faces
on the whole are more attractive.
However, we must realize that femi-t
nine pulchritude may not be the aim
of this particular production. Inj
fact, I do not believe they should be
allowed to take part-they would1
merely destroy the effect. Both our
hairy chested and the more aenemic
varieties of males will certainly add#
considerable humor."
Tilden Batchelder, '42: "It's all a
matter of relativity and what you'ret
after, but I believe girls would got
over much better in a theatrical pro-
duction. In spite of the now famousc
"four out of five" quotation, thereI
are still enough girls here to catchj
and hold the eye.-There are some;
here who can make even a football
player squirm."
Frank Washburn, '43: "The aver-E
age male wins hands down. I have
seen more good-looking fellows with
below-standard dates here than on
any other campus.-I saw a girl last
night who had better built legs than
Herc Renda.
SPECIAL GROUPS!!
Reserve Tables No for
PANHELLENIC DINNER
The Haunted Tavern
417 E. Huron Phone 7781

To create a realistic setting for a
realistic play-that's the problem of
scenery for Play Production's forth-
coming play, " . . . one third of a
nation . . . ", according to Robert
Mellencamp, the organization's scen-
ery director.
As the play pictures life in a tene-
ment, a realistic tenement will con-
stitute the only set, Mellencamp ex-
plained. The structure will be three
stories high and will represent a
cross-section of a typical tenement,
he added.
Four rooms, three stairway land-
ings and three hallways will be
shown, Mellencamp said. Action can
and often does take place at any or
all of these places at any time, he
added, That, of course, constitutes
the chief problem in the setting of
the play.
Great care will be taken in prepar-
ing the scenery, because, in this case,
the scenery is the play. Furniture,
walls and general bakground will be
typical of a tenement: drab, cheap,
dirty, old. Wals will be purposely
dirtied and "any old" furniture will
be used.
Although no change of set will be
needed in ". . . one third of a na-
Baer To Talk
On Cancer Cure
To G.ive University Lecture
At 4:15 P.M. Tomorrow
(Continued from Page 1)
came Commissioner of Public Health
and Superintendent of Charities in
Racine, Wis. He held this position
until he won his present post with the
AMA.
Dr. Bauer is also an associate edi-
tor of Hygeia, the AMA's health
magazine, and director of "Your
Health"-the AMA's radio program
disseminating health hints. ,He is a
member of 10 national committees on
public health and has written several
books including "Health Hygiene and
H o o e y," "Contagious Diseases,"
"Health Questions Answered." He is
co-author of "Your Health Drama-
tized."
Prof. Crane To Talk
At Franklin Institute
Prof. Verner V " rane of the his-
tory department will deliver the
fourth in a series of lectures on Ben-,
jamin Franklin, sponsored by the
Franklin Institute tomorrow in Phila-
delphia.
His subject, "Franklin's Political
Journalism in England," will include
a discussion of 18th century journal-
ism, Franklin's distinctive talents as
a political journalist, his chief poli-
tical ideas, and the influence of his
journalism in America as well as Eng-
land.
Carl Van Doren, author of the
Pulitzer prize-winning biography on
Franklin, inaugurated the current
group of the "Meet Dr. Franklin" con-
ferences. The American Philosophi-
cal Society and the Historical Society
of Pennsylvania are cooperating with
the Franklin Institute in presenting
these lectures.
Professor Crane is basing his ad-
dress upon a lengthy study of Frank-
fin's opinions as expressed in various
English periodicals of the time. This
study will culminate in the forth-
coming publication of an edition
which will feature 65 hitherto un-
edited Franklin essays.

tion . . . ", Mellencamp observed,
this particular set is one of the
largest and most elaborate ever built
by Play Production. In fact, he
concluded, the organization has made
only one or two of this general type.
". . . one third of a nation . . .'
will be given Wednesday through"
Saturday, Dec. 6-9, in th6 Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre. The theatre box!
office opens at 10:30 a.n. Monday.
Jussi Bjoerling
Started Career
I" Music Hall
Some 18 years ago Swedish music
halls probably billed Jussi, Goesta,
Olle and Papa David-the Bjoerling
family quartet-in the spot just be-
low the acrobats, unaware that the
tenor of the four was destined to #
become, at 27, the youngest star of
the Metropolitan Opera Company]
with a repertoire of 54 roles.
That eight-year-old tenor, Jussi
Bjoerling, will appear here to give
the fifth concert of the present Chor-
al Union Series at 8:30 p.m. in Hill
Auditorium. Tickets are still avail-
able at.the School of Music Office,
Dr. Charles A. Sink, president of the
University Musical Society, revealed
yesterday.
It was the youngest member of that
family quartet that Juss made his
first appearance in this country sing-
ing religious and folk music on the
concert stages. In °1923 after the,
tour, the group returned to Sweden
to disband while the three brothers
studied for individual careers.
Jussi's rise was rapid and inevit-
able from that time. He studied in
the Conservatory at Stockholm, in
the Royal Opera School, and seven
years later, made hi's debut in "Don
Giovanni" at the Royal Opera. He
made his first American radio debut
in November 1937, gave his first
recital a month later, and the follow-
ing November was signed by the
Metropolitan.
Socialists Hear Sessions
"Socialism in our Time?" was the
topic of the speech given by Jack
Sessions, '39, National Student Di-
rector of the Young Peoples Socialist
League last night in Room 220 of
the UnioA. Sessions was formerly a
member of the Student Senate here.
He spoke under the auspiecs of the
Michigan chapter of the Young
Peoples Socialist League.

Debate Team Art School Shows
To Meet Ii" Poster Exhibition
An exhibit of posters selected from
entries in a contest held last spring
Audience Will Discuss by the Devoe and Raynolds Com-
Topic Of Argument pany is, now being shown at the Col-
lege of Architecture and Design.
(Continued from Page 1) Designed to foster and encourage
a native American poster art, the
Both also debated at South High entries illustrate various phases of
School in Grand Rapids. travel in this country. A separate
Olson was also state junior college prize was offered by the railroads
extempore speaking champ, and a for the best poster showing travel
I by train. The contest was nation-
member of IRho Pi Alpha, national wide, open to both amateurs and pro-
high school forensic organization. He fessionals, with a grand prize of
edited the high school paper, was $1,000.
business manager of the annual and More than 100 posters are in the
participated in football track and exhibit here, which illustrates a
band in junior college. cross section of the work submitted.
Bowers held several class offices
in high school, participated in ex- The average Williams College 'stu-
tempore speaking, was a member of dent sees three movies per week.
the annual staff, and Rho Pi Alpha
This is his first year at the Univer-
sity.
In previous contests this year, Wil- MAKE AN
liam Muehl, '41, and Arthur Biggins,
'42, met the University of Illinois and OR I ENTAL RUG
Ohio State on the negative side of
the question in non-decision con-
tests Nov. 15 and 17 respectively. a Lasting
Northwestern will debate here next .
Wednesday.Chistma$
. Large assortment of Scatters,
Prof. E. Mains Presides,_7-.-.

r

..

Juss'

BJOERLING
SWEDISH TENOR

III

Prof. E. B. Mains of the botany
department took charge of the meet-
ing of the Botanical Journal Club
last night in the Natural Science'
Bulilding. Papers were presented by
Ralph Bennett, John Hardison, Rob-
eit Hook, and James McCronie. The
Club is headed by Dr. Elmira Glover.
The next meeting will be Dec. 12.

IN SONG RECITAL

Small pieces, Prints, Slippers,
Handicrafts, etc.
N. L. MANGOUNI
334 S. 4th Ave. Phone 6878
0 EXPERT REPAIRING

4

Daily 2-4-7-9 P.M.

-Last Times Today
HUGH HERBERT
FLORENCE RICE
BABY SANDY
"LITTLE
ACCIDENT"
Starting Friday
JAMES CAGNEY
PRISCI LLA LANE
"THE ROARING
TWENTIES"9
Extra
NEWS and CARTOON

A

wiBOBS WATS
R U TH N U SSI
GENE LOCKNA

MICH IGAN
-- Also -
L '>Pete Smith's
'Set 'Em Up'
EY Bowling Short
E Y
RT
CARTOON

~1I

I1

,V

J

I1

BEGINNING

THIS

WEEK

END

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ET DANC

ENG in the Rainbow
of Any Size... No Extra Cha

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