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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 12, 1939 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICIHIGAN-DALY
Crew Of Adventurous Freighter'CityOf Flint Adams Ter

Glueck To Talk
OnArchaeology
Studies Here
Noted Research Director
To Discuss Discoveries
Of Jerusalem Center
Dr. Nelson Glueck, director of the
American Schools of Oriental Re-
search in Jerusalem, will discuss the
results of a three year study of
archaeology in a lecture entitled,
"Archaeology Today," at 4:15 p.m.
Thaursday in the Rackham Auditor-
iul1.
In his lecture tour of the main
peters, of learning in the United
Sttes, Dr. Glueck is describing the
present and past of Palestine on the
basis of first-hand information.
The .American Schools of Oriental
research, established in 1900, have
become prominent anong the several
institutions to which Credit has been
given for original research in the
story of early civilizations. The pur-
pose. of the, American Schools is to
provide a fuller and more adequate
nopwledge of the steps which have
led to. man's , position today. Bach
year of study, Dr. Nelson reports,
has brought a great deal of new in-
fprnation regarding man's early
areer.
DAILY OFFIIAL I
(Continued from Page 8)
will speak on "Lesons from an An-
cient Battlefield."
A social meeting will again be held
riday evening at 8 o'clock at Lane
H-all.
First Church of Christ, Scientist:
Sunday morning service at 10:30.
Subject: "Mortals and Imriortals."
Golden Text: I Corinthians 5:16.
Sunday School at 11:45.
Baptist Church: 9:30, (:raduate
:ble Class. Prof. LeRoy Waterman,
teacher.,
10:45, morning worship. Sermon
topic, "The World Task of the
Church."
12, Student Round Table. Discus.-
sion: "What Can We Beleivp, About
Punishment and Hell?",
6:15, Roger William's Guild in the
Guild House, 503 E. Huron. Panel
Discussion, "What is the Christian
Way to Peace?"
Trinity Lutheran Church will hold
its worship services at 10:30 a.m. Rev.
H. 0. Yoder will deliver the sermon.
Zion Lutheran-Church will hold its
worship services at 10:30. Rev. Stell-
horn will deliver the sermon.-
First Methodist Church: Dr. C. W.
Brashares will preach It the morn-
ing worship service at 10:40 a.m. on
"Listening In."
Stalker Hall: 9:45 a.m. Student
Class at Stalker Hall. Prof. Roy S.
Swinton of the Engineering School
will begin a series of discussions
based on a group of questionnaires
?dealing with the standards of good
and evil, happiness, and other simi-
lar subjects.
'6 p.m. Wesleyan Guild meeting at
the Methodist Church. Dr. Robert
Atkins, District Superintendent of the
'lnt District, will speak on "Peace."
lellowship hour and supper following
the meeting.

Members of/the crew of the American freighter "City of Flint" are seen here aboard the ship, now
Bergen, Norway, after a series of adventures which included capture of the "Flint" by Germans, a trip

at
to

Murmansk, Russia, the start of a voyage toward Germany, then release from her captors by Norway.

Student Interests Considered First
By President, Mrs. Ruthven Says

Church Guilds
Discuss Peace
Armistice Day Themes
Dominate Programs

Faculty And Student Teas
Create Friendly Feelings
Between Various Groups
By ELIZABETH M. SHAW
Student demands come first in the
lives of a university president and
his wife, Mrs. Alexander G. Ruthven
admitted as she cleaned her glasses
with her handkerchief and laid them
on the tea table.
No snap either, she said, is the duty
of a president to create friendly
feelings between the various groups
connected with the University-be-
tween the students and the faculty,
the students and the townspeople, al-
umni and the University, and state
officials and newspapers with the
administration.
Three Teas A Month
For this purpose, the house of the
president is open for three teas each
month, two for students and one for
the faculty. Progress in the cultiva-
tion of student and townspeople re-
lations were indicated by the dinner
for the president, Mrs. Ruthven said,
as many of the local organizations re-
quested tables for the celebration.
"It is impossible to do all the en-
tertaining actually required," she went
on, "but we. do as much as we can get
around to in a year, including many
local women's clubs and out-of-town
conventions."
"O there's the bell again," she re-
marked as she got up to admit a man
and his young son. Loud "hello's"
were soon heard from the study as
President Ruthven greeted his guests,
Oregon Man
"That man just arrived by plane
from Oregon," Mrs. Ruthven ex-
plained when she returned to her
place on the divan opposite the in-
terviewer. "He's an alumnus of the
University and is going to take his
son to the football game. He was
just here a couple of weeks: ago for
the presidential dinner."
Returning to the subject of the in-
terview, Mrs. Ruthven explained that
she believed it her first and most im-
portant duty to take the cares and
burdens of entertaining and of the
family off the president's shoulders so
he can devote his time to other work
in the University.
To further encourage their alumni
elationships, the Ruthvens are leav-
ing tomorrow for a trip to Oklahoma

and Texas, where the president will
address groups in various cities in -
eluding Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Dallas,
Fort Woh, San Antonio, Austin, 'and
Huston.
Loud Bark Heard
A loud bark was heard outside the
door and Mrs. Ruthven got up to ad-
mit Eleanor, the president's well-
known bull-dog., With a dash, he
came in to a warmer clime as the in-
terviewee explained that this was the
first time the household had ever been
left with only one dog.
Each year President Ruthven se-
lects a certain section of the country
for a trip, Michigan's first lady con-
cluded. Two years ago he chose
Seattle for his trip and became the
first University president to speak on
the West coast,
Newman Club Hears
Chicago Prof es sor
Prof. Jerome G. Erwin, head of the
political science department at the
University of Chicago and a leader in
that field spoke to the University of
Michigan Newman Club at a buffet
supper this evening in the Chapel.
Professor Kerwin's topic was "The
Catholic View of the World of To-
day and Tomorrow." He said that
too many persons take either a too
optimistic or too pessimistic view of
the present situation.

(Continued from Page 1)

Congregational Church, will illustrate
his talk "The Art of Listening to
Music" with records. Miss Ruth
Wilson, Grad., formerly of Montevi-
deo, has chosen to speak on "South
American Friendship" before the Lib-
eral Students Union of the Unitarian
Church. David C. Appelt, '40, will
describe Australia in an illustrated
talk at the St. Paul Lutheran fellow-
ship supper at 6 p.m.
Rev. H. P. Marley of the Unitarian
Church will speak on "Justice-More
Precious Than Peace," at the morn-
ing devotions. Dr. W. P. Lemon,
conducting 'the Sunday morning
services, will deliver his sermon on
the subject 'Essential Christianity."
At 5:30 p.m. he will lead a panel dis-
cussion on the topic of "Religious
Perplexities" for which members of
the Westminster Guild will submit
their religious problems.
Rev. Leonard A. Parr for his ser-
mon at the morning service will
speak on "This World's Chronic Mel-
ancholy" at the First Congregational
Church. At the First Baptist Church
Rev. C. H. Louckes will deliver his.
Sunday morning sermon on "The
World Task of the Church."
A meeting of Lutheran students
has been arranged for 5:30 p.m. at
the Luther Parish Hall.

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KIPNIS
The beauty of his voice arid' the aic of his personality
have won artistic triumph for him in the mriusic capitals
of the world. According to the New York Times, he is

,

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