100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 04, 1939 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1939-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

J

ig Opposes Derringer

In

World Series Opener

ee

Power
Reds'
g Aces
Favored 3-1
Cincinnati;
y Not Play

Cinci Star Faces Yanks

Varsity

Shows

Well Against M.S.C

Formatio

Freshmen Use
State's PIays
In Scrimmage

IN THIS CORNER,

I

I-M Sports

y MEL FINEBERG

5-F:

V YORK, Oct. 3
weather tonight]

. -(A)- Old
promised Gus

Pn ani

ve

d family a let-up tomor-
the "hottest" world series
ears-between the mighty
,nd the do-or-die Cincin-
-off to a running start in
adium at 1:30 p.m. (EST).
le lines were drawn with;
i.nnouncement that a clash
tthe greatest right arms
siness today, between Big
fing for the American
and Paul Derringer for the
would feature the opening'

ovided the rain of the last sev-
days goes away and lets the
s alone (the weather man pre-
d officially cloudy and warmer),.
e than 50,000 cash customers were,
cted to turn out in the big Bronx
rard, home of the three-year
di champions, for the first round
hie usual four-out-of-seven set.
,second game follows on Thurs-
then the scene shifts to Cincin-
with the third, fourth and, if
ssary, fifth games to be held in
Rhineland, starting Saturday. -
Rain Prevents Practice
eary skies 'and occasional rain-
s had the Stadium groundskeep-
iorrified at suggestions that the
aulin be removed from the in-
today, so neither club held any-
9 even remotely resembling a
workout. Bothteams, however,
d around with games of "catch"
some running in the outfield.
ith Ruffing's sore arm all "cured"
Lefty Gomez reporting his pulled
muscle back in place, the Yankee
alty list was about cleaned up,
the Reds came up with an ailing
iber. This was Wally Berger,
ing candidate for the Rhine-
ers' leftfield berth. Someone
ped on his foot a few days ago,
the injury necessitated his hav-
one of the toes lanced today. In
event he is not ready to go to-
row, the possibility is Lee Gamble,
g member of the fly-chasing set,
get the call, although old Al Sim-
s, famed slugger of the 1930 Ath-
s, may be used instead.
[hompson Will Be A Starter
) other change in either lineup
contemplated. However, it be-
e apparent that Manager Will
Cechnie's pitching choice for the
i game-after Derringer and
ky Walters have completed their
'es-would be Junior Thompson,
ie right-hander who won 13

Paul Derringer, Cincinnati's greats
right-hander, is Manager BillK
MeKechnie's choice to open for the
Rhinelanders this afternoon in the
first game of the 1939 World Series
with the American League Cham-
pions, the New York Yankees. ,
games and lost five during the regu-
lar season.
For the Yankees, Marse Joe Mc-
Carthy figures on following Ruffing'
with Monte Pearson, the stylish
curve-ball right-hander, and Bump
Hadley, portly veteran. Gomez, tak-
ing as much time as possible to re-
gain his condition, probably will be-
held out until the fourth game be-
fore putting his southpaw smoke ball
and his all-time serie record of six
victories and no defeats on the line.
If he is unable to make it, Oral Hilde-
brand, a graduate from the Browns,
will go.
Despite the recent ailments of the
Bronx Bombers' top pair of elbowers,
the series odds held steady today,
still favoring the Yankees at 1 to 3
to win the series. and 4 to 1 ,to turn
the trick in four straight.
Yanks Better All-Around
On paper, the Yankees, proven un-
der fire as world titleholders since
1938, outshine the Reds in every de-
partment. Paced by the mighty bat
of Joe DiMaggio, who won the Amer-
ican League's hitting championship
with a .381 season average, and Ruff-
ing, the loop's No. 1 right-hander.
ever since the club skyrocketed to
the first pennant of its current string,
Murderer's Row has gone into the
books as one of the greatest ball,
clubs of all time.
Yet, the outfit is weaker this year
than for the last three campaignsi
simply because of the absence of
"Iron Horse" Lou Gehrig. First-
baseman-slugger extraordinary since
1925, Gehrig was finally retired for
good early this season, suffering
from a form of infantile paralysis. In
his place is Babe Dahlgren, a better
fielder but far weaker hitter. Still,
despite the loss of Lou, the Yanks
! finished this season 17 games in front'.

Yearling Team Is Stopped
After Scoring T h r e e
Times; Pass Drill Held
Wallie Weber's freshmen gridders
gave the Wolverines their first dose
of Michigan State plays yesterday,
and according to Coach Fritz Crisler'
"the first team's defense against the
Spartan formations was reasonably
good."
The yearlings started against Cris-'
ler's second team, and tallied once
when Terry Flynn, a big end from
South Sioux City, Neb., grabbed a
pass in the end zone.
Then came the first team, and two
more scores followed in rapid suc-
cession. First Fred Dawley, a former
Detroit All-city halfback galloped"
through right tackle for a 30-yard
run, and then Dave Derby, an All-
state fullback from Benton Harbor
slashed through the opposite side of
the forward wall, twisted past the
Varsity secondary and raced across
the goal.
Varsity Line Holds Tight
Aside from these three plays, how-,
ever, Weber's frosh found the Varsity
line a =tough nut to crack. From four
to six regulars shot in on every play'
and stopped the yearling charges
close to the scrimmage line.
Especially hearteningto see was
the' Crisler squad's treatment of the
old Spartan favorite, the end around
play. For the past several years
Bachman has used thispiece of stra-
tegy with 'amazing success. It was a
familiar sight during the past two
Spartan-Wolverine encounters to
watch Ole Nelson lugging the pig-
skin around the flanks, but yesterday
the Wolverine regulars stopped the
play cold every time it was, tried.
Crisler announced after thework-
out that the Varsity will again work
on defense against the State plays
a la the yearling squad today. The
general taloring off process will start
tomorrow and the team will leave for
Barton Hills Friday for the usual pre-
game quietude away from the Ann
Arbor confusion.
Drill On Passing, Place-Kicking
Besides the defense, work, Crisler
also drilled his teamon passing and
place kicking yesterday. Although
Harmon, Frauman and Melzow all
showed'up well in the ,point-after-
touchdown attempts, Crisler was still
a bit worried as to what the trio could
do under pressure. Harmon has had
the experience, but 80,000 spectators
can have a lot of effect on how the
other two place kickers will do on the
scene of battle.

Well, One Never Can Tell .
They're off at New York today in the World Series and before the
baseball year is out there's a little tale we'd like to relate.
It happened a long time ago, around 1900 when Barney Dreyfuss
owned the Pittsburgh Pirates and Fred Clark was their manager. At this
particular moment, the Pirates were lounging lazily in the Stygian side
of the first division (this might have been this year) and evidently one
of their fans made the Pittsburgh cause his cause. This letter came to
Dreyfuss:
Dear Mr. Dreyfuss:
I notice by the standings that the Pittsburgh Pirates are in seventh
ploxe. I waited until this tnie because I know you wil be pressed to
use me. I can bat over .400 and can field like a veritable rabbit. Within
three weeks after I have joined your aggregation, you will have
climbed to the first division. You still have a chance to win the pen-
nant. What is your top salary?
Yours truly
Hampton Corners
Dreyfuss got the letter and was madder than a hornet. But he thought
'that even dandelions bloom and he showed the epistle to Clark. Clark de-
cided that seventh place was no roadway to heaven, wrote the modest lad
and asked him what position he played. The answer came back:
Dear Mr. Clark,
I usually play in a slightly bent-over position but on hard line drives
I always straighten up. Please tell me when you want me to report.
Yours truly
Hampton Corners

Fraternity athletic managers will
meet in the Union at 7:30 tonight in
order to arrange schedules and for-
mulate plans, for the forthcoming
year of athletic competition between
the greek letter groups. The fall pro-
gram gets under way Oct. 10 with
speedball'slated as the first event.
Forty-one social fraternities and'
17 professional houses will make up
the two fraternity leagues this year.
Approximately 500 men will thus
participate in the fraternity athletic
program.

N EN RY, DON'T YOU T4INk
I'LL FIND WILP QU iCKER
JIF I LOOg IN ThE.
YELLOW PAGES OF TPE
TELEPHO~NE. DIRECTORY
UNDER EMPLOYMENT

FROSH SWIMMERS
aAll freshmen who wish tot
out for yearling swimming squ
are requested to meet at the Intr
mural Building at 4 p.m. Thu
day.
-Matt Mann
TAILOR and CLEANER
Suits Made To Measure
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
Also Alterations and Repairin
609 PACKARD STREET

ti

But anecdotal raconteuring only begs the
everyone except Herbert Orrin (Fritz) Crisler.
So it's off the deep end again. 'The Yankees
six games.

question that now bothers
Who will win the Series?
will win-in either five or

F _. / ..
I /
/.-4

*tl,
JI

Savilla Returns Faster And Better . .
Roland Savilla is the most improved player on the Michigan football
team. The rangy tackle, out with injuries most of last year, was not expect-
ed back for practice this fall. His appearance was pure windfall gain and
the wind has been blowing hard ever since.
Even last year, the gridders claimed that Savilla was the toughest
-man in the line to move. And this year he has added speed. One of
the backfield men put it this way. "When I'm catching a punt and see
Savilla coming at me I want to either drop the ball or start running the
other way. He hits too hard."

r , rl

ii.

Only a bad leg plus a psychological willingness to be hurt because of
the 'injury can keep the big senior from being rated as all-American timber.
Captain Archie Kodros and Reuben Keito rate behind Savilla in
improvement. Kodros may be old stuff as far as advancement goes
(he always improves) but Kelto still breathes the musty air of obscur-
ity. Last year .he was shifted to center after Koddy was hurt but he
didn't see an action. This year, back at tackle and still well-hidden
from curious eyes, he has come up unheralded and unannounced. He
has continued to plug and, according to Line Coach Clarence Munn,
is pretty close to arriving.
Ralph Fritz and Forest Jordan are a couple of others. Except when
the Butch puts on a private feud with his opposing tackle, he can go. At
times, Jordan. looks great. At other times he grates. Fielding H. Yost
said that "if Jordan would play all the time as well as he does every fourth
play, Michigan might have another all-American guard this year."
Dennis Kuhn, out since early pre-season training with a dislocated
elbow, expects to be back Monday. When asked if he would be able to do
any contact work the big tackle replied, "It'll be 'the works."
It'll be good to see Kuhn out there again. 'The big fellow loves
to play. He'd have to love it to make the sacrifices he's made. Last
ye'ar he worked from ten at night to six in the morning at Ford's, get
back to Ann; Arbor for a quick nap, go to classes in the morning, go to
practice in the afternoon, eat. sleep and study after practice and then'
go back to Detroit to work. He was supporting his mother at the time.
This year he saved enough money so that he wouldn't have to work
at school. He wanted to make the team but the dislocated elbow handed
him a terrific set-back. It'll be a long, hard pull for Kuhn to make the
Varsity from here on in but at least he'll be back in there. He's one guy
you know is always trying.

-"
" It's free and flexible on your feet. The boot-
toe is soft. No seams. For town or stepping out nights.
Walk-Over JODHPUR- Black or brown calf. a675 -

TURN- INN... SIP- INN

COLLEGE - INN

Listen to the World Series

STARBUCK
College Inn
321 S. MAIN DOWNTOWN

S

_ , _
"- srserM rrerlr s®e w.s/sl

w

mw

Spartans Troubled
By Michigan Plays
EAST LANSING, Oct. 3.-(IP)-
Scrimmage on the Michigan State1
College campus this week has proven
what the Spartan's late-game defeat
of Wayne University showed-that
Coach Charley Bachman yet has not
developed a dependable attack and
has only three days in which to do so
before meeting Michigan.,
A red-shirted "Michigan" team run
by quarterback C a s e y Klewicki
tromped over two varsity elevens in
scrimmage, both offensively and de-
fensively and gave the coaching staff
a 'long list of "do's and dont's" to
hammer into the players heads.
The psuedo-Wolverine line had al-
most as much success at smearing the
varsity running game as did the Tar-
tars of Wayne last Saturday. The
backfield found itself continually un-
able to get started before it was
tripped up.
Garcia May Fight Hostak
SEATTLE, Oct. 3.-(P)-Promoter
Nate Druxman said today he had
offered Ceferino Garcia, conqueror
of Freddie Apostoli, a championship
match here against Al Hostak, NBA-
recognized middleweight champion in
the 46 states not recognizing the
Garcia claim.

Trosko May Be Out I
The Michigan football team was
faced with the possible loss of vet-
eran tailback Fred Trosko through.
ineligibility. The Flint senior's sta-
tus is clouded, but may be cleared
up by Thursday.
Trosko won the Chicago Alumni
Award during his freshman year, was
regular tailback during his sopho-
more year, and last year was under-
study to Paul Kromer.

NEW YORK (AL)
Crosetti ... .ss
Rolfe........3b
Keller .....rf
DiMaggio ... cf
Dickey ........c
Selkirk ...... If
Gordon ......2b
Dahlgren ... lb
Ruffing . . p

CINCIN. (NT)
Werber......3b
Frey .......2b

I

Ii

BURTON'S

Thel Probable Lineups

WALI SuhOVER
115 South Main Street

Goodman ....
McCormick
Lombardi ...
Craft.. ..
Berger .....
Myers ......
Derringer

rf
lb
c
cf
if
Ss
p

A LARGE VARIETY

i " . Of A I

,1

GREAT ST

MICHIG N
STATER

Priced 10c to $2.50

\
F LA N NELS
TWEEDS
Dozens of new and very attractive
patterns, every one guaranteed to
give satisfactory service.
s{ i

SWM

THE UNION PO

I

IN .

Schenker's
Suggests
Starting Oct. 5th - a store-wide
Value Roundup of Fall and Winter
Hardware. The Roundup lasts ten
days.
The manufacturer, the jobber,
and ourselves have created a per-
fect triangle of Roundup values
for You.
Should we oversell on any item
during these ten days, we can back-

mwl

I

STERILE

SAFE

WA WD'S

HI-BOARD DIVING-LOW, OARD

II

STEAM

BATH

SHOWERS

.

1I

II

I

c

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan