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March 01, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tk-*7w --Mr- rw ,;- W .-

rers pecves
Will Sponsor
StoryContest
Campus Journal Will Join
With 'Story' Magazine
In Fiction Competition
Perspectives, campus literary mag-
ain6, will conduct a preliminary
ompetition for the Seventh Annual
Story Magazine short stdry contest,
1Aines Allen, '40 and Harvey Swados,
'0, co-editors, announced yesterday.
Manuscripts are to be submitted'
iefore Thursday, March 14. Because
ach college is limited in its numberj
)f entries to "Story," two will be cho-
en by regular student-faculty board
f Perspectives and entered in the all-
ollege contest as representative of
he University of Michigan.
First Prize $100
"Story "offers $100 as a first prize,
50 for the second. It will accept
nly ianuscripts that have been en-
Lorsed by the University through the
reliminary contest, and reserves the
-ight to allow reprinting of the win-
fing selections in short story anthol-
Vies. The winning fiction will be
)ublisbed in "Story."
Perspectives, according to Allen, re-
eive8 the right to print any story
ubihitted. The rules of the national
dieht permit publication of manu-
;cfpts in college periodicals.
College Students Eligible
All students registered in a col-
ege in the United States are eligible
o enter. Manuscripts should be
yped, double-spaced and the num-
ei of words recorded. They may be
ubmitted to any mem'ber of the Per-
pective fiction staff, at the Student:
?ublications Building, or at the Eng-
ish or engineering English depart-
rent offices.
In addition to contest entries, Per-
pectives' editors are seeking other
ypes of material for the magazine's
ou'th issue of the year. The dead-;
ine for manuscripts has been moved
from March 7 to March 14. Es-
ays may be submitted to essay edi-
Or David Spengler, '40; poetry to
Fmes Green, '40; and book reviews:
o' dwin G. Burrows, Grad., book-
eview editor.

Ann ArborI

Debaters Win Three ForensiC Meets

I

Here Is Today's
T*- ..s

;

News

ii i Un mmary I
Opportunity for Ann Arborites to
become idols of the screen will be
offered by the Junior Chamber of
Commerce when production on a film
entitled "We're in the Movies" begins
here March 15.
The premiere of the picture has
been set for April 1 in the Ann Arbor
high school auditorium. The plot
will concern a girl who wins a movie
queen contest and proceeds to fall
head over heels in love with the direc-
tor.
Anyone in Ann Arbor interested in
trying out for roles in the film are
asked to telephone or call at the
Junior Chamber of Commerce officel
during the next two weeks..
The picture will be shot in public
places in and about Ann Arbor so
that residents may see a film in the
making. It will be produced partly in
color, and when finished will runl
about one hour and 45 minutes.
* * *
The Ann Arbor Builders and Mer-
chants Exhibit continues today at
the Masonic Temple with the Roy
Hoyer Studio of Dance providing to-
night's entertainment.
Doors open at 2 p.m. and close at
10 p.m. Movies provided by the Fed-
eral Housing Administration will be.
shown twice during the day. The ex-
hibit closes tomorrow.
Plans for the spring series of lec-
tures dealing with community prob-
lems of Ann Arbor have been formu-
lated by the Ann Arbor Social Serv-
ice Seminar of the Community Fund
Association.
Emphasis in the series will be
placed on various local social agen-
cies concerned with community prob-
lems.
First lecture of the series will be
given by Mrs. Irene Murphy of De-
troit on the subject "How Do Ann
Arbor's Social Agencies Enter Family'
Life?" The date of the lecture has
not yet been set.
Folier Traces
Art Of Hindus
In entral Java
(Continued from Page 1)

Pictured above is the squad of Sigma Rho Tau debaters which has
participated in five intercollegiate debates this year, winning three out
of five decisions. They are: Left to right (front row): Max Anning,
'41E, John Hammelef, '42E, Prof. Robert D. Brackett, facillty advisor
for the organization, Vance Middlesworth, '41E, (back row) Norman
Taylor, '42E, Dean Woodbury, '42E, Howard Fox, '40E, and Malcolm
Bulmer, '42E. Not pictured here but on the team are J. Wade Flaherty,
40E, and Rex Burnham, '42E.
COMPUS Leaders Taste Varies
On Five Most Influential Books

Modern
Bible
Votes

Novels, +
Receive
In Book

Classics,
Student
Review,

Calls Tryouts

outs for the business staff
tichiganensian will be held
p.m. today on the second fl
Student Publications Build
ding to Richard T. Waterm
ess manager of the book.

of
at

Inexpensive
Log Cottages

Iraunt Cedar
CABINS
- * -
CW Cutis

loor rows of the smaller buildings when
irig, viewed in relation to the secondary
Ian, and primary works. "The harmony
and unity of this age shows the high-
est splendor and characteristics of
the Hindu art," Dr. Fokker main-
tained.
The third chronological stage of
Hindu art in Central Java destroyed
this fundamental harmony and over-
rated the decorative values at the
expense of the structural phases,
Dr. Fokker claimed. This period
marked the decline of Hindu art in
this section of the world, he said,
adding that the basic figures lost
their significance as the use of orna-
ments became intensified.
Dr. Fokker, praising Hindu art for'
"its delicate refinement," first traced
the emigration of the Hindus from
India to the Malayan peninsula and
then to Sumatra and Java.
Born in Batavia, Java, Dr. Fokker
was educated at the Universities of
Leiden and Amsterdam, specializing
in international law.

By WILLIAM NEWTON
Little agreement was evidenced by
the replies given recently by six cam-
pus leaders to the question "what
five books have most influenced your
life and thinking?" In fact, the
only volume which won mention more
than once from the BMOC's and
BWOC's was the Bible.
Barbara Bassett, president of Pan-
hellenic Association, named Lynd
Ward's "God's Man" as her first
choice, citing the "true-to-life cynic-
ism of this story told in woodcuts."
She also picked "Ghosts," by Hen-
rik Ibsen; "Rebecca," by Daphne
duMaurier; Ward's second volume of
Woodcuts, "Madman's Drum," and
"Hamlet," by William Shakespeare.
Dorothy Shipman, president of the
League, said that "The Bible" and
its teachings have strong effect on
everyone's life and thought. "Sar-
for Resartus,'" by Thomas Carlyle;
Land Cl1assification
Work Is Discussed ,
In Mc~urry Talk
Land classification work done in
,his country, beginning with the orig-
inal land office survey and progress-
ing through the work of geologic.
surveys, forest service projects, up
to the recent heightened interest in
the work growing out of attempts
at adjustment necessitated by eco-
nomic and social problems in certain
areas, was discussed by Prof. K. C.
McMurry, chairman of the depart-
ment of geography, recently. Profes-
sor McMurry addressed a seminar
of the Conservation Institute at
Michigan State College at East Lan-
sing.
Technical consultant for a com-
mittee of the National Resources
Planning Board, Professor McMurry
stated that University departments
have contributed important research
works to the whole study of classifi-
cation which will constitute the first
work of its kind done in this coun-
try.

A. A. Milne's "Winnie the Pooh,"
"Little Women," by Louisa M. Alcott
and "The Importance of Living," by
Lin Yutang, were Miss Shipman's
other choices.
"A Tree Grown Straight," by Percy
Marks, was named as first choice by
Dye Hogan, president of the "M" Club
and the senior class of the literary
college. He also chose Saint Augus-
tine's "Confessions;" "Up From Slav-
e\v," by Booker T. Washington;
"Foundations of Democracy," a re-
print of the Smith-Taft debates on
New Deal policy, and "Upstream,"
by Ludwig Lewissohn.
Tom Adams, president of the In-
terfraternity Council, agreed with
Miss Shipman in placing "The Bible"
first on his list. Adams said he felt
that Webster's Dictionary deserved
to be his second choice, followed by
Marcus Aurelius' "Meditations," Jos-
eph Conrad's ''Lord Jim," and "The
Federalist," by Madison Hamilton and
Jay.
Carl Wheeler, president of the
Men's Judiciary Council admitted
that he has only read one book, aside
from technical works, sincehis fresh-
man year in high school. "That one
is "The Count of Monte Cristo," by
Dumas, and I've read it three times,"
Wheeler said.
Don Treadwell, president of the
Union, said that aside from textbooks,
he could only name three books which
have influenced his life particularly.
Treadwell chose Jaimes^ Hilton's
"Lost Horizon," Bellamy's "Looking
Backward" and John Galsworthy's
"Forsythe Saga.".
Slosson To Speak
Oan Europe Sunday
Prof. Preston W. Slosson of the
history department will speak on
"The European Situation" at 2:30
p.m. Sunday in Room 316 of the
Union, Peter F. Brown, 41E, of the
Union student staff, announced yes-
terday.
The talk will be given before the
Sunday Forum sponsored by the
Student Senate and the Union. Pro-
fessor Slosson will also conduct a
discussion of the subject following
his lecture.

. Box 349

Phone.804-F3

4

IPTIVATING!THEY'RE PALPITATINGI
Rogues or Romeos? A gorgeous,
gyratious gal unmasked them . .
after two blondes met sudden deathl

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TODAY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.,
CLASSIFI1ED
ADVERTISING
RAT;ES
Effective as of February 14, 1939
12c per readingline (in basis of
five average words to line) for one
or two insertions.
10c per reading line for three or
more insertions.
Minimum of 3 lines per inser-
tion.
These low rates are on the basis
of cash payment before the ad is
inserted. If it is inconvenient for
you to call at our offices to make
payment, a messenger will be sent
to pick up your ad at a slight extra
charge of 15c.
For further information call
23-24-1, or stop at 420 Maynard
Street.
TYPING-18
TYPING-Experienced. Miss Allen,
408 S. Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935 or
2-1416: 34
TRANSPORTATION -.1
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company. Phone
7112. 13
WEEKEND round trip to Grand
Rapids or Muskegon, $1.00. Call
3169. 305
WANTED-TO BUY - 4
EHIGHEST CASH PRICE paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claude Brown, 512 S. Main Street.
146
LAUNDERING-9
LAUNDRY 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low prices. 16
FOR RENT
FOUR, five or six rooms including
heat, hot water, and janitor ser-
vice. Phone 8507. 306
MISCELLANEOUS -20
COLLEGE BEAUTY SHOP: Offe7
good work at low prices. Special'
oil permanents, $1.95. Shampoo
and wave, 50c all week. Open eve-
niriffa__nh one 2-213. 303R

f,
4

..._-..

State
Street

y...fearlessly...on the screen!

DA~~rod . AUCtio o
THE
G RAPES
OF

The Gordon DOVER (button-down
collar) is one of the best sellers
at

m Joad
sy
-...--

e
,Wqa ~ma.,

at
Liberty

..Wl i

3"""

VRPAT H

Gordon Dover Gets
Around A Lot!
"f'M Arrow's famous oxford shirt with the
button-down roll collar. My good looks
and fine behavior have made me the most
ubiquitous college shirt in the world.
I never get hot under my fine fitting collar,
and never in my long life will I shrink out
of fit because I'm Sanforized-Shrunk and
can't shrink more than a wee 1%. My buttons
are genuine ocean pearl and anchored fast.
In return for my liberal college education
I spend most of my time fishing for compli-
ments ... and boy, you should hear the girls
rave! For-$2 you can get one of my brothers
in white or blue. We're a handsome tribe of
Arrow Gordons ... we are !"
ARROW SHIRTS

I

HENRY FONDA
JANE OARWELL
JOHN CARRADINE

Pa Joad RUSSELL SIMPSON

Al
Muley

0. Z. WHITEHEAD
' JOHN QUALEN
Mnnir Miilli AN

.........

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< "' s

PUADI"FYCAPFrI U Pnnn...

-I

.=============

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