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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 01, 1940 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1940-06-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THR M ICH11C.AAT n - AFir - v

vrru'ryn v 44%AA

TTLi " ". T 4 1 l7T1-AN1M IVElTT LT

S4ATURDAY, JUN 1, 19D40

D

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Chinese EssayC
Contest Plans
Announ Rced

'

Actor Herbert Rudley Discusses
Romantic Technique In Theatre,

Senior Class

r or not I wanted to join the ad- 'Our Stake In The Future
anted course before the outbreak of Of China' To Be Topic;
he war, I'm now positive that I wish
D receive a commission as I feel that Winner To Get $1,200
is the duty of every patriotic "Our Stake in the Puture of China",
rnerican to do his part. The idea topic of a Chinese essay contest in
hat ROTC men will be in more dan- American universities and colleges,
er than others in war time, is utter offers $5,000 in prizes and a trip to
onsense."
The minority opinion here, which China for college students writing
as held by only three of those inter- the best 1,500 word essay on this sub-
ewed, was expressed by Arthur Kol- ject, Dr. Raleigh Nelson of the In-
n, '42. He declared: "When I joined ternational Center announced.
Le ROTC I intended to take the ad- The original essay must deal with
anced course and obtain a commis-
on but now, because of the war, I the necessity of the independent sov-
ave changed my mind. Perhaps I ereign power of China in relationship
n an idealist but the fact remains to the United States. The manu-
at I don't want to fight in this con- scripts will be judged on the basis
ict as I don't believe in the cause of presen'tation and evaluation of
f either fide. I believe that in the factual material by a board of judges
OTC I'll have to go to war and composed of Dr. Roy Chapman An-
tat is one thing I don't want to do." drews, Alexander Woollcott, Rear
Admiral Yarnell, U.S. Navy (retired),
Senator Elbert Thomas of Utah, The-
odore Roosevelt, Pearl Buck, Dr.
TYPEW RITERS James Shortwell of Columbia Uni-
of all -makes versity, and Mrs. William Meloney,
editor of This Week Magazine.
PA CKED The winner will receive $1,200 as
a cash prize and a round trip to
STORED China via the China Clipper if condi-
S H I PP ED tions are favorable in the Far East
at the time of the award.
0. 9. MORRILL Entries must be submitted by June
Kresge's) 30 accompanied by an application
314 . State St. (opp. Krblank which may be obtained at
Phone 4615 the International Center, Dr. Nelson
announced.

By S. R. WALLACE
He enjoys kissing Madge Evans.
He's good looking and sophisticat-
ed, but something of the boy who
lives down the block. His eyes are
hazel, his hair brown, and he is well
built as an actor should be. but he
has political views. He lives John
Kohler's life on the Lydia Mendels-
sohn stage in "The World We Make"
-but he'll have you know he is quite
a different individual as Herbert Rud-
ley.
For instance, as to romantic tech-
nique: "The part I am taking in your
Dramatic Season play requires the
portrayal of a sensitive, gentle char-
acter. I play him as an actor is re-
quired to, with my mind, body and
emotions. But I can't say that I
would react to his situations in the
same way." This with sincerity.
Even in the romantic scenes?
"Well, of course, in those I admit
I am to be envied playing opposite
Miss Evans. However, the man who
kisses her in the play is John Koh-
ler."
You mean that isn't your own tech-
nique?
"I don't think so." Embarrassed
laugh. "An actor has no definite ro-
mantic technique . . . each charac-
ter requires different movements and
expression. And the director of a
play has a good deal to do with de-
termining that expression. Kohler
expresses unsophistication."
Oh. Are you sophisticated?
"Uh-I've read a few books." Slight
reddening and tie rearrangement.
.How long have you been in the
theatre?
"Ten years. I left Temple Univer-
sity when I won a scholarship with
the Eve LeGallienne's Fourteenth
Street Reportory Theatre."
What are some of the plays you've
appeared in?
" Romeo and Juliet', 'Abe Lincoln
in Illinois', 'Brother Rat', and as you
know in Broadway's 'The World We
Make'."
Is Broadway as immoral as Rich-
ard Temple, another actor here for
the Season, said it is?
"There is as much immorality in
New York as there is in Ann Arbor."
Stated with muchdconviction.
Well! That doesn't reflect very
well on people here.
"It's no reflection at all. I mean
simply that people have the
same motivations anywhere. Per-
haps Broadway is so misrepresented

I
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Collects Dues1
Nixon Announces Deadi1-e
On Student Payiments
Senior dues of one dollar for stu-
dents in the literary college will be
collected by class officers and mem- 1
bers of the finance committee for the
last time on the campus today, Don
Nixon, '40, chairman, announced yes-
terday.
Most of the money received, which
will be turned over to the Class Of fi-
cers' Committee of the Alumni Asso-
ciation, will be used to maintain con-
tacts between officers and members
after graduation and provide for re-I
unions every five years. A small por-
tion of it, however, will be utilized to
pay for incidental class expenditures.
Student officers who will be col-
lecting dues are Dye Hogan, presi-
dent; Jane Xewitt, vice-president;
Herb Lev, secretary, and Margaret
Neafie, treasurer.

Alpha Nu Honors
iajor E. Bowes'
Alpha Nu. honorary forensic soci-
ety voted Major Edward Bowes an
honorary membership at their lastI
meeting of the year.
A telegram informing him of his'
nomination was sent to the Major
before his recent broadcast on which
Ann Arbor was the honor city. The
society lauded him for his work "in
preparing human talent for the stage
and not for the Battlefield."
A letter was received from the
Major by Alpha Nu Tuesday express-
ing his grateful thanks for the honor
bestowed upon him.
11i~ball II Whiner Named
The new winner of the title for
women's baseball on campus is Delta
Gamma, who won the final game of
the baseball tournament from Mosh-
er Hall yesterday, by a score of 4 to 3.

Landecker Elected Head
Of Sociology Fraternity
Election of officers of Alpha Kappa
Delta, national honorary sociological
fraternity, took place at an informal
meeting held recently at the home
of Prof. Clark Tibbits of the sociolo-
gy department.
Officers elected for the academic
year 1940-41 are: Werner S. Landeck-
er, Grad., president: George Frank,
Grad., vice-president; Beverly Gen-
ness, recording secretary; Betty M.
Hall, '41, corresponding secretary and
Charlotte M. Babinski, treasurer.
TRAVEL SERVICE
BUS - PLANE - BOAT
Selected Tours
MICHIGAN UNION
TRAVEL BURFAU
Hours: 10-5 daily Phi. 2-4431

HERBERT RUDLEY
because of the peculiar spirit of cam-
We have camraderie here.
We have comraderie here.
"I suppose so. But an actress will
come breezing into the theatre after
a few days of rehearsal with 'darling'
or 'honey' on her lips for most of the
men in the cast."
Really? Well, coeds use the same
expressions.
"That may be, but on Broadway
the follow-up is different." Broad
grin.
Oh. (And a broad gulp on our
part).

r

r

-

4

r
r.

S EDDIE ALBERT
*~ ROSEMARY LANE
WAYNE MORRIS-JANE
WYMAN - RONALD
REAGAN-RUTH TERRY

NEWS

..r

t _......

0

o-I--

K

Martha Scott
To Play Lead
In"Our Tftwn'
With her appearance as the femi-
nine lead in the cinema version of
Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer prize-
winning play, "Our Town", Martha
Scott, '32, is making her Hollywood
debut.
While a student here, Miss Scott
was associated with Play Production
and participated actively in many
dramatic activities. Following grad-
uation, she took a department store
job, was soon signed by the civic
repertory theatre in Detroit, and
played in tabloid versions of Shake-
speare at the Chicago's World Fair.
Born in a small town herself,
Jamesport, Mo., Miss Scott made her
Broadway appearance as the small-
town girl in "Our Town", a perform-
ance which dramatic critics acclaimed
for its delicate beauty.
She is now living in Hollywood,
working on her next role, that of
Emma in Jane Austen's novel.
Band Officers
Are Appointed
Park, Gottschall Selected
By ProfessorRevelli
Stuart A. Park, '42, and George
Gottschall, 42E, were named busi-
ness manager and formations chair-
man respectively of the University
Band yesterday by Prof. William Re-
velli, conductor.
The librarian, quartermaster, stu-
dent conductor, and staff assistants
will be announced Commencement
Week. Retiring officers are: Donn
Chown, Grad., business manager;
Lee Chrisman, '40SM; Herbert Wat-
kins, faculty manager; Donald
Marrs, '40M; and Sidney Berg, SM,
librarian.
Senior awards for service in the
band during four years were made
recently at the annual banquet to
Victor Cherven, '4OSM, Chown, Ed-
win. Cooper, '40, Richard: Correll,
'40SM, Marrs, Hubert Martin, '4OSM,
Eldor Pflughoeft, '40SM, Kenneth
Summerfelt, '40SM, and Chrisman.
They will receive an 'M' blanket.

Sure I'll Sign"
While I have my pen in hand
signing the Declaration of Inde-
pendence, I might as well note a
word or two about my favorite
eating place. Um-m-m, such
food! Ah-h-h, such service!
Oh-h-h, such savings! It's the
choice of the people.

Smake your get-away--a
G"R-E Y HOU NDS

WINES
Bottled and Draught
BEER

THE
FLRfUTZ CfFE
122 W. Wash.-On the Corner
We close every Monday.

R E D U C E D F
Get ready-get set-get going by Greyhound l
Whether you're headed back home for the sum-
mer or on a little expedition somewhere ele,
run, don't walk, to the nearest Super-Coach.
The most profitable way to spend your time
as you roll across the map is to figure out just
what to do with all the wealth you save on
Greyhound's low, reduced fares.tLearn for your-
self what upperclassmen learned long ago.-the
best way to get out of cnllege is by Greyhound!
BUS DEPOTS
Michigan Union Phone 2-4431
"Blue Goose" Phone 4209

Sample One-Way
Fres
Buffalo .... $ 5.65
Chicago .... 3.60
Cleveland, 0. 3.00
Cincinnatti . 4.50
Dallas, Tex.. 15.30
Milwaukee .. 5.00
St. Louis .... 6.50
New York .. 10.85
Washington . 9.60
Pittsburgh .. 4.85

CHURCH
DIRECTORY

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL CHURCH
Theodore Schmale, Pastor.
432 South Fourth Avenue. Dial 8498.
9:30 A.M. Church School.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship. The sermon topic
will be "Poverty and Power."
Student Guild meetings have been discontinued
for the year.

t1

ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Catherine at Division Street.
Rev. Henry Lewis, Rector.
Rev. Frederick W. Leech, Assistant Minister.
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
11:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Sermon by
Rev. Frederick W. Leech.
11:00 A.M. Special Primary Closing Service.
11:00 A.M. Children's Chapel.
11:00 A.M. Kindergarten in Harris Hall.
7:00 P.M. Student Meeting -- Open House in
Harris Hall.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets.
Leonard A. Parr, D.D., Minister.
Director of Music, Donn Chown.
Organist, Mrs. Mary McCall Stubbins.
9:30 A.M. Junior and Intermediate Depart-
ments of the Church School.
10:30 A.M. Primary and Kindergarten Depart-
ments of the Church School.
10:45 A.M. Public Worship. Dr. Parr will speak
on "Life and the Three R's."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 South Division Street

I
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1
A
r
.

MODERN GAS COOKERY IS
AVAILABLE TO FRATERNITY
AND SORORITY HOUSES, TOO
You'll like the TIME-SAVING, FOOD-SAVING, and FUEL-SAVING that these
modern gas ranges, built specially for volume cooking, will bring to the fraternity and
sorority kitchen. You'll like the flexibility - the capacity - of these sturdy, compact
ranges, for you'll find they can adequately take care of the cooking for the big crowd
on a Homecoming Day, or just as efficiently handle the cooking for the few around the
house during a vacation week. As have many others, you'll discover that the kitchen
keeps much cooler - the thoroughly insulated ovens see to that. And baking or roasting
is done without guesswork by the time and temperature method with the accurate oven
heat controls. Fine broiling and griddle facilities are ready for instant use. The large
top burners give just the right heat for any type of top cooking - irstantly!
INVESTIGATE NOW TIE ADVANTAGES THAT GAS WITH THESE
GARLAND RANGES OFFERS.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue. Dial 2-4466.
William P. Lemon, D.D., Minister.
Lillian Dilts, Assistant.
William N. Barnard, Director of Music.
10:45 A.M. Morning Wirship Service. "Our Wit's
End-and Beyond" will be the subject of the
sermon by Dr. W. P. Lemon.
6:00 P.M. Westminster Student Guild. Picnic
supper in Council Wing. This will be the last
meeting of the year, and all students are
urged to attend,
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Washington Streets.
Charles W. Brashares, Minister.
Choir Director, Hardin Van Deursen.
Organist, Mary Porter.
10:40 A.M. Morning Worship Service. Dr. Bra-
shares will preach.

MICHIGAN

Sunday, 10:30 A.M. Services.
11:45 A.M. Sunday School.
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Wednesday
Ing.

Evening Meet-

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner of 512 East Huron.

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